• Conventional superconductivity follows Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer(BCS) theory of electrons-pairing in momentum-space, while superfluidity is the Bose-Einstein condensation(BEC) of atoms paired in real-space. These properties of solid metals and ultra-cold gases, respectively, are connected by the BCS-BEC crossover. Here we investigate the band dispersions in FeTe$_{0.6}$Se$_{0.4}$($T_c$ = 14.5 K $\sim$ 1.2 meV) in an accessible range below and above the Fermi level($E_F$) using ultra-high resolution laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We uncover an electron band lying just 0.7 meV ($\sim$ 8 K) above $E_F$ at the $\Gamma$-point, which shows a sharp superconducting coherence peak with gap formation below $T_c$. The estimated superconducting gap $\Delta$ and Fermi energy $\epsilon_F$ indicate composite superconductivity in an iron-based superconductor, consisting of strong-coupling BEC in the electron band and weak-coupling BCS-like superconductivity in the hole band. The study identifies the possible route to BCS-BEC superconductivity.
  • LiVO$_2$ is a model system of the valence bond solid (VBS) in $3d^2$ triangular lattice. The origin of the VBS formation has remained controversial. We investigate the microscopic mechanism by elucidating the $d$ orbital character via on-site $^{51}$V NMR measurements in a single crystal up to 550 K across a structural transition temperature $T_c$. The Knight shift, $K$, and nuclear quadrupole frequency, $\delta \nu$, show that the 3d orbital with local trigonal symmetry are reconstructed into a $d_{yz}d_{zx}$ orbital order below $T_c$. Together with the NMR spectra with three-fold rotational symmetry, we confirm a vanadium trimerization with $d$-$d$ $\sigma$ bonds. The Knight shift extracts the large Van-Vleck orbital susceptibility, $\chi^{\rm VV} = 3.6 \times 10^{-4}$, in a paramagnetic state above $T_c$, which is comparable to the spin susceptibility. The results suggest that orbitally induced Peierls transition in the proximity of the frustrated itinerant state is the dominant driving force of the trimerization transition.
  • The pronounced enhancement of the effective mass is the primary phenomenon associated with strongly correlated electrons. In the presence of local moments, the large effective mass is thought to arise from Kondo coupling, the interaction between itinerant and localised electrons. However, in d electron systems, the origin is not clear because of the competing Hund's rule coupling. Here we experimentally address the microscopic origin for the heaviest d fermion in a vanadium spinel LiV2O4 having geometrical frustration. Utilising orbital-selective 51V NMR, we elucidate the orbital-dependent local moment that exhibits no long-range magnetic order despite persistent antiferromagnetic correlations. A frustrated spin liquid, Hund-coupled to itinerant electrons, has a crucial role in forming heavy fermions with large residual entropy. Our method is important for the microscopic observation of the orbital-selective localisation in a wide range of materials including iron pnictides, cobaltates, manganites, and ruthnates.
  • Single-crystalline thin film of an iridium dioxide polymorph Ir2O4 has been fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition of LixIr2O4 precursor and the subsequent Li-deintercalation using soft chemistry. Ir2O4 crystallizes in a spinel (AB2O4) without A cations in the tetrahedral site, which is isostructural to lambda-MnO2. Ir ions form a pyrochlore sublattice, which is known to give rise to a strong geometrical frustration. This Ir spinel was found to be a narrow gap insulator, in remarkable contrast to the metallic ground state of rutile-type IrO2. We argue that an interplay of strong spin-orbit coupling and a Coulomb repulsion gives rise to an insulating ground state as in a layered perovskite Sr2IrO4.
  • Motivated by the discovery of superconductivity in F-doped LaFeAsO, we investigated the magnetic fluctuations in a related compound Fe(Se1-xTex)0.92 (x = 0.75, 1) using neutron scattering techniques. Non-superconducting FeTe0.92 shows antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering with the ordering vector |Q| = 0.97 A-1 (Q = (0.5,0,0.5)) at TN ~ 70 K and a structural transition between tetragonal and monoclinic phases. In the AF monoclinic phase, the low-energy spectral weight is suppressed, indicating a possible gap formation. On the other hand, in the paramagnetic tetragonal phase, we observed a pronounced magnetic fluctuation around at |Q| ~ 0.92 A-1, which is slightly smaller than the commensurate value. In Fe(Se0.25Te0.75)0.92, which does not show magnetic ordering and shows superconductivity at Tc ~ 8 K, we observed that a magnetic fluctuation is located at |Q| ~ 0.9 A-1 at low energies and shifts to a higher value of |Q| ~ 1.2 A-1 at higher energies. The latter value is close to a reciprocal lattice vector Q = (0.5,0.5,0.5) or (0.5,0.5,0), where the AF fluctuations are observed in other FeAs-based materials. The existence of this common characteristic in different Fe-based superconductors suggests that the AF fluctuations may play a important role in superconductivity.
  • We have synthesized a new spinel oxide LiRh2O4 with a mixed-valent configuration of Rh3+ and Rh4+. At room temperature it is a paramagnetic metal, but on cooling, a metal-insulator transition occurs and a valence bond solid state is formed below 170 K. We argue that the formation of valence bond solid is promoted by a band Jahn-Teller transition at 230 K and the resultant confinement of t2g holes within the xy band. The band Jahn-Teller instability is also responsible for the observed enhanced thermoelectric power in the orbital disordered phase above 230 K.
  • A new pyrochlore ruthenium oxide, Hg2Ru2O7 was synthesized under a high pressure of 6 GPa. In contrast to the extensively studied Ru4+ oxides, this compound possesses a novel Ru5+ valence state, corresponding to a half-filled t_2g_3 electron configuration. Hg2Ru2O7 exhibits a first order metal-insulator transition at 107 K, accompanied by a structural transition from cubic to lower symmetry. The behavior of the magnetic susceptibility suggests the possible formation of a spin singlet in the insulating low temperature state.