• The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • Responding to calls from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for new proposals to measure the gravitational constant $G$, we offer an interesting experiment in deep space employing the classic gravity train mechanism. Our setup requires three bodies: a larger layered solid sphere with a cylindrical hole through its center, a much smaller retroreflector which will undergo harmonic motion within the hole and a host spacecraft with laser ranging capabilities to measure round trip light-times to the retroreflector but ultimately separated a significant distance away from the sphere-retroreflector apparatus. Measurements of the period of oscillation of the retroreflector in terms of host spacecraft clock time using existing technology could give determinations of $G$ nearly three orders of magnitude more accurate than current measurements here on Earth. However, significant engineering advances in the release mechanism of the apparatus from the host spacecraft will likely be necessary. Issues with regard to the stability of the system are briefly addressed.
  • We apply general relativity to construct the post-Newtonian background manifold that serves as a reference spacetime in relativistic geodesy for conducting relativistic calculation of the geoid's undulation and the deflection of the plumb line from the vertical. We chose an axisymmetric ellipsoidal body made up of perfect homogeneous fluid uniformly rotating around a fixed axis, as a source generating the reference geometry. We, then, reformulate and extend hydrodynamic calculations of rotating fluids done by previous researchers to the realm of relativistic geodesy to set up algebraic equations defining the shape of the post-Newtonian reference ellipsoid. To complete this task, we explicitly perform all integrals characterizing gravitational field inside the fluid body and represent them in terms of the elementary functions depending on its eccentricity. We fully explore the coordinate freedom of the equations describing the post-Newtonian ellipsoid and demonstrate that the fractional deviation of the post-Newtonian level surface from the Maclaurin ellipsoid can be made much smaller than the previously anticipated estimate based on the coordinate gauge advocated by Bardeen and Chandrasekhar. We also derive the gauge-invariant relations of the post-Newtonian mass and the angular velocity of the rotating fluid with the parameters characterizing the shape of the post-Newtonian ellipsoid. We formulate the post-Newtonian theorems of Pizzetti and Clairaut that are used in geodesy to connect the geometric parameters of the reference ellipsoid to the physically measurable force of gravity at the pole and equator. Finally, we expand the post-Newtonian geodetic equations to the Taylor series with respect to the eccentricity of the ellipsoid and discuss their practical applications.
  • The present paper extends the Newtonian concept of the geoid in classic geodesy towards the realm of general relativity by utilizing the covariant geometric methods of the perturbation theory of curved manifolds. It yields a covariant definition of the anomalous (disturbing) gravity potential and formulate differential equation for it in the form of a covariant Laplace equation. The paper also derives the Bruns equation for calculation of geoid's height with full account for relativistic effects beyond the Newtonian approximation. A brief discussion of the relativistic Bruns formula is provided.
  • We study physical consequences of the Hubble expansion of FLRW manifold on measurement of space, time and light propagation in the local inertial frame. We analyse the solar system radar ranging and Doppler tracking experiments, and time synchronization. FLRW manifold is covered by global coordinates (t,y^i), where t is the cosmic time coinciding with the proper time of the Hubble observers. We introduce local inertial coordinates x^a=(x^0,x^i) in the vicinity of a world line of a Hubble observer with the help of a special conformal transformation. The local inertial metric is Minkowski flat and is materialized by the congruence of time-like geodesics of static observers being at rest with respect to the local spatial coordinates x^i. We consider geodesic motion of test particles and notice that the local coordinate time x^0=x^0(t) taken as a parameter along the world line of particle, is a function of the Hubble's observer time t. This function changes smoothly from x^0=t for a particle at rest (observer's clock), to x^0=t+1/2 Ht^2 for photons, where H is the Hubble constant. Thus, motion of a test particle is non-uniform when its world line is parametrized by time t. NASA JPL Orbit Determination Program presumes that motion of light (after the Shapiro delay is excluded) is uniform with respect to the time t but it does not comply with the non-uniform motion of light on cosmological manifold. For this reason, the motion of light in the solar system analysed with the Orbit Determination Program appears as having a systematic blue shift of frequency, of radio waves circulating in the Earth-spacecraft radio link. The magnitude of the anomalous blue shift of frequency is proportional to the Hubble constant H that may open an access to the measurement of this fundamental cosmological parameter in the solar system radiowave experiments.
  • We study evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic (EM) wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. One builds a local coordinate system in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate. Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to decide whether atomic clocks ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on EM modes of a cavity. To resolve the ambiguity we analyzed the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its EM modes in an expanding universe by employing the Maxwell equations. We found out that both the size of the cavity and the EM frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal coordinates as the universe expands. We set up the oscillation equation for the EM modes, solve it by the WKB approximation, and reduce the coordinate-dependent quantities to their counterparts measured by a local observer who counts time with atomic clock. The solution shows that there is a perfect cancellation of the adiabatic drift of cavity's frequency by the transformation to local coordinates, and the time counted by the clocks based on EM modes of cavity has the same rate as that of atomic clocks. We conclude that there should be no cosmological drift of frequency of a standing EM wave oscillating in the cavity resonator as compared to the frequency of atomic clocks. Continuous comparison of the frequency of the optical cavity resonator against that of atomic clock yields a powerful null test of the local isotropy of the Hubble expansion and the Einstein equivalence principle in cosmology.
  • The extremely high precision of current astronomical observations demands a much better theoretical treatment of relativistic effects in the propagation of electromagnetic signals through variable gravitational fields of isolated astronomical systems emitting gravitational waves. This paper presents a consistent approach giving a complete and exhaustive solution of this problem in the first post-Minkowskian approximation of general relativity.
  • We analyse the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) for a Hubble observer in Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetime. We show that the affine structure of light cone in the FLRW spacetime should be treated locally in terms of the optical metric which is not reduced to the Minkowski metric due to the non-uniform parametrization of the local equations of light propagation with the proper time of the observer's clock. The physical consequence of this difference is that the Doppler shift of radio waves measured locally, is affected by the Hubble expansion.
  • The present paper outlines theoretical principles of the post-Newtonian mechanics in the expanding universe. It is based upon the gauge-invariant theory of the Lagrangian perturbations of cosmological manifold caused by an isolated astronomical N-body system. We postulate that the background manifold is described by Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric governed by two primary components - the dark matter and the dark energy. The dark matter is treated as an ideal fluid. The dark energy is described by a single scalar field with a potential which is hold unspecified as long as the theory permits. The Lagrangian of the dark matter and that of the scalar field are formulated in terms of the field variables. We use variational calculus to derive the gauge-invariant field equations of the post-Newtonian celestial mechanics of an isolated astronomical system in an expanding universe. These equations generalize the field equations of the post-Newtonian theory in asymptotically-flat spacetime by taking into account the cosmological effects explicitly. We introduce a new cosmological gauge which generalizes the harmonic gauge of the post-Newtonian theory in asymptotically-flat spacetime. This gauge significantly simplifies the gravitational field equations and allows finding out the approximations where the field equations can be fully decoupled and solved analytically. The residual gauge freedom is explored. The results of the present paper can be useful in the solar system for calculating more precise ephemerides of the solar system bodies on extremely long time intervals, in galactic astronomy to study the dynamics of clusters of galaxies, and in gravitational wave astronomy for discussing the impact of cosmology on generation and propagation of gravitational waves emitted by coalescing binaries and/or merging galactic nuclei.
  • The mathematical concept of the Newtonian limit of Einstein's field equations in the expanding Friedmann universe is formulated. The geodesic equations of motion of planets and light are derived and compared.
  • Post-Newtonian theory was instrumental in conducting the critical experimental tests of general relativity and in building the astronomical ephemerides of celestial bodies in the solar system with an unparalleled precision. The cornerstone of the theory is the postulate that the solar system is gravitationally isolated from the rest of the universe and the background spacetime is asymptotically flat. The present article extends this theoretical concept and formulates the principles of celestial dynamics of particles and light moving in gravitational field of a localized astronomical system embedded to the expanding Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe. We formulate the precise mathematical concept of the Newtonian limit of Einstein's field equations in the conformally-flat FLRW spacetime and analyze the geodesic motion of massive particles and light in this limit. We prove that by doing conformal spacetime transformations, one can reduce the equations of motion of particles and light to the classical form of the Newtonian theory. However, the time arguments in the equations of motion of particles and light differ from each other in terms being proportional to the Hubble constant, H. This leads to the important conclusion that the equations of light propagation used currently by Space Navigation Centers for fitting range and Doppler-tracking observations of celestial bodies are missing some terms of the cosmological origin that are proportional to the Hubble constant, H. We also prove that the Hubble expansion does not affect the atomic time scale used in creation of astronomical ephemerides. We derive the cosmological correction to the light travel time equation and argue that their measurement opens an exciting opportunity to determine the local value of the Hubble constant, H, in the solar system independently of cosmological observations.
  • IAU 2000 resolutions on the reference frames set up a solid theoretical foundation for implementing general relativity in astronomical data processing algorithms and for unambiguous interpretation of measured relativistic effects. We discuss possible directions for further theoretical development of the IAU resolutions aimed to take into account the decadal progress in observational techniques and computer-based technologies. We address the following subjects: 1) space-time transformations and the structure of the metric tensor; -2) PPN parameters and gauge invariance of equations of motion; -3) astronomical reference frames for cosmological applications.
  • We construct a set of reference frames for description of the orbital and rotational motion of the Moon. We use a scalar-tensor theory of gravity depending on two parameters of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism and utilize the concepts of the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 2000. We assume that the solar system is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat. The primary reference frame has the origin at the solar-system barycenter (SSB) and spatial axes are going to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to distant quasars. The secondary reference frame has the origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is local with its spatial axes spreading out to the orbits of Venus and Mars and not rotating dynamically in the sense that both the Coriolis and centripetal forces acting on a free-falling test particle, moving with respect to the EMB frame, are excluded. Two other local frames, the geocentric (GRF) and the selenocentric (SRF) frames, have the origin at the center of mass of the Earth and Moon respectively. They are both introduced in order to connect the coordinate description of the lunar motion, observer on the Earth, and a retro-reflector on the Moon to the observable quantities which are the proper time and the laser-ranging distance. We solve the gravity field equations and find the metric tensor and the scalar field in all frames. We also derive the post-Newtonian coordinate transformations between the frames and analyze the residual gauge freedom of the solutions of the field equations. We discuss the gravitomagnetic effects in the barycentric equations of the motion of the Moon and argue that they are beyond the current accuracy of lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations.
  • Millisecond and binary pulsars are the most stable astronomical standards of frequency. They can be applied to solving a number of problems in astronomy and time-keeping metrology including the search for a stochastic gravitational wave background in the early universe, testing general relativity, and establishing a new time-scale. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires that proper unbiased estimates of spin and orbital parameters of the pulsar be obtained. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise components present in pulsar timing residuals. The instrumental white noise has predictable statistical properties and makes no harm for interpretation of timing observations, while the astrophysical/geophysical low-frequency noise corrupts them, thus, reducing the quality of tests of general relativity and decreasing the stability of the pulsar time scale.
  • We derive explicit Lorentz-invariant solution of the Einstein and null geodesic equations for data processing of the time delay and ranging experiments in gravitational field of moving gravitating bodies of the solar system - the Sun and major planets. We discuss general-relativistic interpretation of these experiments and the limitations imposed by motion of the massive bodies on measurement of the parameters gamma_{PPN}, beta_{PPN} and delta_{PPN} of the parameterized post-Newtonian formalism.
  • We compare two theoretical approaches to the data analysis of the Cassini relativity experiment based on the Doppler tracking and the time delay technique that were published correspondingly by Kopeikin et al in Phys. Lett. A 367, 276 (2007) and by Bertotti et al in Class. Quant. Grav. 25, 045013 (2008). Bertotti et al believed that they found a discrepancy with our paper and claimed that our analysis was erroneous. The present paper elucidates, however, that the discrepancy is illusory and does not exist. The two techniques give the same result making it evident that the numerical value of the PPN parameter 'gamma' measured in the Cassini experiment is indeed affected by the orbital motion of the Sun around the barycenter of the solar system.
  • We construct a set of post-Newtonian reference frames for a comprehensive study of the orbital dynamics and rotational motion of the Moon and Earth by means of lunar laser ranging (LLR) with the precision of one millimeter. We also derive the post-Newtonian coordinate transformations between the frames and analyze the residual gauge freedom, which is used for removing spurious post-Newtonian effects from the equations of motion of the solar system bodies.
  • Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements are crucial for advanced exploration of the evolutionary history of the lunar orbit, the laws of fundamental gravitational physics, selenophysics and geophysics as well as for future human missions to the Moon. Current LLR technique measures distance to the Moon with a precision approaching one millimeter that strongly demands further significant improvement of the theoretical model of the orbital and rotational dynamics of the Earth-Moon system. This model should inevitably be based on the theory of general relativity, fully incorporate the relevant geophysical/selenophysical processes and rely upon the most recent IAU standards in order to give us the opportunity to perform the most precise fundamental test of general relativity in the solar system in robust and physically-adequate way. The talk discusses new methods and approaches in developing such a mathematical model.
  • ASTROD I is a planned interplanetary space mission with multiple goals. The primary aims are: to test General Relativity with an improvement in sensitivity of over 3 orders of magnitude, improving our understanding of gravity and aiding the development of a new quantum gravity theory; to measure key solar system parameters with increased accuracy, advancing solar physics and our knowledge of the solar system and to measure the time rate of change of the gravitational constant with an order of magnitude improvement and the anomalous Pioneer acceleration, thereby probing dark matter and dark energy gravitationally. It is an international project, with major contributions from Europe and China and is envisaged as the first in a series of ASTROD missions. ASTROD I will consist of one spacecraft carrying a telescope, four lasers, two event timers and a clock. Two-way, two-wavelength laser pulse ranging will be used between the spacecraft in a solar orbit and deep space laser stations on Earth, to achieve the ASTROD I goals. A second mission, ASTROD II is envisaged as a three-spacecraft mission which would test General Relativity to one part per billion, enable detection of solar g-modes, measure the solar Lense-Thirring effect to 10 parts per million, and probe gravitational waves at frequencies below the LISA bandwidth. In the third phase (ASTROD III or Super-ASTROD), larger orbits could be implemented to map the outer solar system and to probe primordial gravitational-waves at frequencies below the ASTROD II bandwidth.
  • Gravitomagnetic field is covariantly split in the {\it intrinsic} and {\it extrinsic} parts, which are generated by rotational and translational currents of matter respectively. The {\it intrinsic} component has been recently discovered in the LAGEOS spacecraft experiment. We discuss the method of detection of the {\it extrinsic} tidal component with the lunar laser ranging (LLR) technique. Analysis of the gauge residual freedom in the relativistic theory of three-body problem demonstrates that LLR is currently not capable to detect the {\it extrinsic} gravitomagnetic effects which are at the ranging level of few millimeters. Its detection requires further advances in the LLR technique that are coming in the next 5-10 years.
  • General relativistic deflection of light by mass, dipole, and quadrupole moments of gravitational field of a moving massive planet in the Solar system is derived in the approximation of the linearized Einstein equations. All terms of order 1 microarcsecond are taken into account, parametrized, and classified in accordance with their physical origin. We discuss the observational capabilities of the near-future optical and radio interferometers for detecting the Doppler modulation of the radial deflection, and the dipolar and quadrupolar light-ray bendings by Jupiter and the Saturn.
  • General relativistic deflection of light by mass, dipole, and quadrupole moments of gravitational field of a moving massive planet in the Solar system is derived. All terms of order 1 microarcsecond are taken into account, parametrized, and classified in accordance with their physical origin. We calculate the instantaneous patterns of the light-ray deflections caused by the monopole, the dipole and the quadrupole moments, and derive equations describing apparent motion of the deflected position of the star in the sky plane as the impact parameter of the light ray with respect to the planet changes due to its orbital motion. The present paper gives the physical interpretation of the observed light-ray deflections and discusses the observational capabilities of the near-future optical (SIM) and radio (SKA) interferometers for detecting the Doppler modulation of the radial deflection, and the dipolar and quadrupolar light-ray bendings by the Jupiter and the Saturn.
  • First post-Newtonian (PN) approximation of the scalar-tensor theory of gravity is used to discuss the effacing principle in N-body system, that is dependence of equations of motion of spherically-symmetric bodies comprising the system on their internal structure. We demonstrate that the effacing principle is violated by terms which are proportional to the second order rotational moment of inertia of each body coupled with \beta-1, where \beta is the measure of non-linearity of gravitational field. In case of general relativity, where \beta=1, the effacing principle is violated by terms being proportional to the rotational moment of inertia of the forth order. For systems made of neutron stars (NS) and/or black holes (BH) these terms contribute to the orbital equations of motion at the level of the third and fifth PN approximation respectively.
  • Astrophysical space missions deliver invaluable information about our universe, stellar dynamics of our galaxy, and motion of celestial bodies in the solar system. Astrometric space missions SIM and Gaia will determine distances to stars and cosmological objects as well as their physical characteristics and positions on the celestial sphere with microarcsecond precision. These and other space missions dedicated to exploration of the solar system are invaluable for experimental testing of general relativity. Permanently growing accuracy of space and ground-based astronomical observations require corresponding development of relativistic theory of reference frames, motion of celestial bodies, and propagation of light/radio signals from a source of light/radio to observer. Such theory must be based on Einstein's general relativity and account for various relativistic effects both in the solar system and outside of its boundary. We describe a hierarchy of the relativistic frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 2000, and outline directions for its theoretical and practical extentions by matching the IAU 2000 reference frames in the solar system to the cosmological Friedman-Robertson-Walker reference frame and to the frames used in the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism.
  • We discuss a covariant generalization of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism in a class of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. It includes an exact construction of a set of global and local (Fermi-like) references frames for an isolated N-body astronomical system as well as PPN multipolar decomposition of gravitational field in these frames. We derive PPN equations of translational and rotational motion of extended bodies taking into account all gravitational multipoles and analyze the body finite-size effects in relativistic dynamics that can be important at the latest stages of orbital evolution of coalescing binary systems. We also reconcile the IAU 2000 resolutions on the general relativistic reference frames in the solar system with the PPN equations of motion of the solar system bodies used in JPL ephemerides.