• We report the discovery of a nearby dwarf galaxy in the constellation of Hydrus, between the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. Hydrus 1 is a mildy elliptical ultra-faint system with luminosity $M_V\sim$ -4.7 and size $\sim$ 50 pc, located 28 kpc from the Sun and 24 kpc from the LMC. From spectroscopy of $\sim$ 30 member stars, we measure a velocity dispersion of 2.7 km/s and find tentative evidence for a radial velocity gradient consistent with 3 km/s rotation. Hydrus 1's velocity dispersion indicates that the system is dark matter dominated, but its dynamical mass-to-light ratio M/L $\sim$ 66 is significantly smaller than typical for ultra-faint dwarfs at similar luminosity. The kinematics and spatial position of Hydrus~1 make it a very plausible member of the family of satellites brought into the Milky Way by the Magellanic Clouds. While Hydrus 1's proximity and well-measured kinematics make it a promising target for dark matter annihilation searches, we find no evidence for significant gamma-ray emission from Hydrus 1. The new dwarf is a metal-poor galaxy with a mean metallicity [Fe/H]=-2.5 and [Fe/H] spread of 0.4 dex, similar to other systems of similar luminosity. Alpha-abundances of Hyi 1 members indicate that star-formation was extended, lasting between 0.1 and 1 Gyr, with self-enrichment dominated by SN Ia. The dwarf also hosts a highly carbon-enhanced extremely metal-poor star with [Fe/H] $\sim$ -3.2 and [C/Fe] $\sim$ +3.0.
  • We use a new panoramic imaging survey, conducted with the Dark Energy Camera, to map the stellar fringes of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to extremely low surface brightness V $\gtrsim$ 32 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. Our results starkly illustrate the closely interacting nature of the LMC-SMC pair. We show that the outer LMC disk is strongly distorted, exhibiting an irregular shape, evidence for warping, and significant truncation on the side facing the SMC. Large diffuse stellar substructures are present both to the north and south of the LMC, and in the inter-Cloud region. At least one of these features appears co-spatial with the bridge of RR Lyrae stars that connects the Clouds. The SMC is highly disturbed -- we confirm the presence of tidal tails, as well as a large line-of-sight depth on the side closest to the LMC. Young, intermediate-age, and ancient stellar populations in the SMC exhibit strikingly different spatial distributions. In particular, those with ages $\sim$ 1.5-4 Gyr exhibit a spheroidal distribution with a centroid offset from that of the oldest stars by several degrees towards the LMC. We speculate that the gravitational influence of the LMC may already have been perturbing the gaseous component of the SMC several Gyr ago. With careful modeling, the variety of substructures and tidal distortions evident in the Magellanic periphery should tightly constrain the interaction history of the Clouds.
  • We designed a follow-up program to find the spectroscopic properties of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud (HAC) and test scenarios for its formation. We measured the radial velocities (RVs) of 45 RR Lyrae in the southern portion of the HAC using the facilities at the MDM observatory, producing the first large sample of velocities in the HAC. We found a double-peaked distribution in RVs, skewed slightly to negative velocities. We compared both the morphology of HAC projected onto the plane of the sky and the distribution of velocities in this structure outlined by RR Lyrae and other tracer populations at different distances to N-body simulations. We found that the behaviour is characteristic of an old, well-mixed accretion event with small apo-galactic radius. We cannot yet rule out other formation mechanisms for the HAC. However, if our interpretation is correct, HAC represents just a small portion of a much larger debris structure spread throughout the inner Galaxy whose distinct kinematic structure should be apparent in RV studies along many lines of sight.
  • We exploit the exquisite, deep Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) imaging data to probe the Galactic halo out to 200 kpc. Using the ~100 square degree, multi-band photometry of the first HSC Wide survey data release, we identify blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars beyond 50 kpc in the halo. The presence of the Sagittarius (Sgr) stream in the HSC fields produces a notable excess of stars at the apocentre of the leading arm (~50-60 kpc). For fields excluding Sgr, the BHB counts are consistent with a continuation of a -4 power-law from the inner halo. However, we find that the majority of the non-Sgr BHB stars beyond 50 kpc reside in one 27 square degree HSC field called "VVDS". Curiously, this field is located close to the Magellanic plane, and we hypothesize that the excess of stars between 50 and 200 kpc could be associated with distant Magellanic debris. Indeed, without the VVDS, there are very few BHBs in the remaining portions of the Galaxy probed by the HSC. Accordingly, this scarcity of tracers is consistent with a significant decline in stellar density beyond 50 kpc, with a power-law of -4 or steeper.
  • In this paper we describe the routine photometric calibration of data taken with the VIRCAM instrument on the ESO VISTA telescope. The broadband ZYJHKs data are directly calibrated from 2MASS point sources visible in every VISTA image. We present the empirical transformations between the 2MASS and VISTA, and WFCAM and VISTA, photometric systems for regions of low reddening. We investigate the long-term performance of VISTA+VIRCAM. An investigation of the dependence of the photometric calibration on interstellar reddening leads to these conclusions: (1) For all broadband filters, a linear colour-dependent correction compensates the gross effects of reddening where $E(B-V)<5.0$. (2) For $Z$ and $Y$, there is a significantly larger scatter above E(B-V)=5.0, and insufficient measurements to adequately constrain the relation beyond this value. (3) The $JHK\!s$ filters can be corrected to a few percent up to E(B-V)=10.0. We analyse spatial systematics over month-long timescales, both inter- and intra-detector and show that these are present only at very low levels in VISTA. We monitor and remove residual detector-to-detector offsets. We compare the calibration of the main pipeline products: pawprints and tiles. We show how variable seeing and transparency affect the final calibration accuracy of VISTA tiles, and discuss a technique, {\it grouting}, for mitigating these effects. Comparison between repeated reference fields is used to demonstrate that the VISTA photometry is precise to better than $\simeq2\%$ for the $Y$$J$$H$$Ks$ bands and $3\%$ for the $Z$ bands. Finally we present empirically determined offsets to transform VISTA magnitudes into a true Vega system.
  • We report the discovery, spectroscopic confirmation, and mass modelling of the gravitationally lensed quasar system PS J0630-1201. The lens was discovered by matching a photometric quasar catalogue compiled from Pan-STARRS and WISE photometry to the Gaia DR1 catalogue, exploiting the high spatial resolution of the latter (FWHM $\sim $0.1") to identify the three brightest components of the lens. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the WHT confirm the multiple objects are quasars at redshift $z_{q}=3.34$. Further follow-up with Keck AO high-resolution imaging reveals that the system is composed of two lensing galaxies and the quasar is lensed into a $\sim$2.8" separation four-image cusp configuration with a fifth image clearly visible, and a 1.0" arc due to the lensed quasar host galaxy. The system is well-modelled with two singular isothermal ellipsoids, reproducing the position of the fifth image. We discuss future prospects for measuring time delays between the images and constraining any offset between mass and light using the faintly detected Einstein arcs associated with the quasar host galaxy.
  • Gaia's exceptional resolution (FWHM $\sim$ 0.1$^{\prime\prime}$) allows identification and cataloguing of the multiple images of gravitationally lensed quasars. We investigate a sample of 49 known lensed quasars in the SDSS footprint, with image separations less than 2$^{\prime\prime}$, and find that 8 are detected with multiple components in the first Gaia data release. In the case of the 41 single Gaia detections, we generally are able to distinguish these lensed quasars from single quasars when comparing Gaia flux and position measurements to those of Pan-STARRS and SDSS. This is because the multiple images of these lensed quasars are typically blended in ground-based imaging and therefore the total flux and a flux-weighted centroid are measured, which can differ significantly from the fluxes and centroids of the individual components detected by Gaia. We compare the fluxes through an empirical fit of Pan-STARRS griz photometry to the wide optical Gaia bandpass values using a sample of isolated quasars. The positional offsets are calculated from a recalibrated astrometric SDSS catalogue. Applying flux and centroid difference criteria to spectroscopically confirmed quasars, we discover 4 new sub-arcsecond-separation lensed quasar candidates which have two distinct components of similar colour in archival CFHT or HSC data. Our method based on single Gaia detections can be used to identify the $\sim$ 1400 lensed quasars with image separation above 0.5$^{\prime\prime}$, expected to have only one image bright enough to be detected by Gaia.
  • We study the kinematic properties of the Eastern Banded Structure (EBS) and Hydra I overdensity using exquisite proper motions derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Gaia source catalog. Main sequence turn-off stars in the vicinity of the EBS are identified from SDSS photometry; we use the proper motions and, where applicable, spectroscopic measurements of these stars to probe the kinematics of this apparent stream. We find that the EBS and Hydra I share common kinematic and chemical properties with the nearby Monoceros Ring. In particular, the proper motions of the EBS, like Monoceros, are indicative of prograde rotation (V_phi ~ 180-220 km/s), which is similar to the Galactic thick disc. The kinematic structure of stars in the vicinity of the EBS suggest that it is not a distinct stellar stream, but rather marks the "edge" of the Monoceros Ring. The EBS and Hydra I are the latest substructures to be linked with Monoceros, leaving the Galactic anti-centre a mess of interlinked overdensities which likely share a unified, Galactic disc origin.
  • We study the structure of the inner Milky Way using the latest data release of the Vista Variables in Via Lactea (VVV) survey. The VVV is a deep near-infrared, multi-colour photometric survey with a coverage of 300 square degrees towards the Bulge/Bar. We use Red Clump (RC) stars to produce a high-resolution dust map of the VVV's field of view. From de-reddened colour-magnitude diagrams we select Red Giant Branch stars to investigate their 3D density distribution within the central 4 kpc. We demonstrate that our best-fit parametric model of the Bulge density provides a good description of the VVV data, with a median percentage residual of 5$\%$ over the fitted region. The strongest of the otherwise low-level residuals are overdensities associated with a low-latitude structure as well as the so-called X-shape previously identified using the split RC. These additional components contribute only $\sim5\%$ and $\sim7\%$ respectively to the Bulge mass budget. The best-fit Bulge is `boxy' with an axis ratio of [1:0.44:0.31] and is rotated with respect to the Sun-Galactic Centre line by at least $20^{\circ}$. We provide an estimate of the total, full sky, mass of the Bulge of $M_\mathrm{Bulge}^{\mathrm{Chabrier}} = 2.36 \times 10^{10} M_{\odot}$ for a Chabrier initial mass function. We show there exists a strong degeneracy between the viewing angle and the dispersion of the Red Clump absolute magnitude distribution. The value of the latter is strongly dependent on the assumptions made about the intrinsic luminosity function of the Bulge.
  • Only in the Milky Way is it possible to conduct an experiment which uses stellar streams to detect low-mass dark matter subhaloes. In smooth and static host potentials, tidal tails of disrupting satellites appear highly symmetric. However, perturbations from dark subhaloes, as well as from GMCs and the Milky Way bar, can induce density fluctuations that destroy this symmetry. Motivated by the recent release of unprecedentedly deep and wide imaging data around the Pal~5 stellar stream, we develop a new probabilistic, adaptive and non-parametric technique which allows us to bring the cluster's tidal tails into clear focus. Strikingly, we uncover a stream whose density exhibits visible changes on a variety of angular scales. We detect significant bumps and dips, both narrow and broad: two peaks on either side of the progenitor, each only a fraction of a degree across, and two gaps, $\sim2^{\circ}$ and $\sim9^{\circ}$ wide, the latter accompanied by a gargantuan lump of debris. This largest density feature results in a pronounced inter-tail asymmetry which cannot be made consistent with an unperturbed stream according to a suite of simulations we have produced. We conjecture that the sharp peaks around Pal 5 are epicyclic overdensities, while the two dips are consistent with impacts by subhaloes. Assuming an age of 3.4 Gyr for Pal 5, these two gaps would correspond to the characteristic size of gaps created by subhaloes in the mass range of $10^6-10^7 M_\odot$ and $10^7-10^8 M_\odot$ respectively. In addition to dark substructure, we find that the bar of the Milky Way can plausibly produce the asymmetric density seen in Pal 5 and that GMCs could cause the smaller gap.
  • We combine Gaia data release 1 astrometry with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images taken some ~10-15 years earlier, to measure proper motions of stars in the halo of our Galaxy. The SDSS-Gaia proper motions have typical statistical errors of 2 mas/yr down to r ~ 20 mag, and are robust to variations with magnitude and colour. Armed with this exquisite set of halo proper motions, we identify RR Lyrae, blue horizontal branch (BHB), and K giant stars in the halo, and measure their net rotation with respect to the Galactic disc. We find evidence for a gently rotating prograde signal (< $V_\phi$ > ~ 5-25 km/s) in the halo stars, which shows little variation with Galactocentric radius out to 50 kpc. The average rotation signal for the three populations is < $V_\phi$ > = 14 +/- 2 +/- 10 (syst.) km/s. There is also tentative evidence for a kinematic correlation with metallicity, whereby the metal richer BHB and K giant stars have slightly stronger prograde rotation than the metal poorer stars. Using the Auriga simulation suite we find that the old (T >10 Gyr) stars in the simulated halos exhibit mild prograde rotation, with little dependence on radius or metallicity, in general agreement with the observations. The weak halo rotation suggests that the Milky Way has a minor in situ halo component, and has undergone a relatively quiet accretion history.
  • We report the discovery of tidal tails around the Galactic globular cluster NGC 7492, based on the Data Release 1 of the Pan-STARRS 1 survey. The tails were detected with a version of the matched filter technique applied to the $(g-r,r)$ and $(g-i,i)$ color-magnitude diagrams. Tidal tails emerging from the cluster extend at least $\sim$3.5 degrees in the North-East to South-East direction, equivalent to $\sim1.5$ kpc in projected length.
  • We exploit the first data release from the Gaia mission to identify candidate Mira variables in the outskirts of the Magellanic Clouds. The repeated observations of sources during the initial phase of the Gaia mission is used to identify stars that show signs of variability. This variability information, combined with infrared photometry from 2MASS and WISE, allows us to select a clean sample of giants in the periphery of the LMC. We find evidence for Miras surrounding the LMC out to ~20 deg in all directions, apart from the North-West quadrant. Our sample does not generally follow the gas distribution of the Magellanic system; Miras are notably absent in the gaseous bridge between the LMC and SMC, but they are likely related to the stellar RR Lyrae bridge reported by Belokurov et al. (2016). The stellar stream discovered by Mackey et al. (2016) to the North of the LMC is almost perfectly delineated by our Mira variables, and likely extends further East toward the Galactic plane. The presence of an intermediate-age population in this stream advocates an LMC disc origin. We also find a significant excess of Miras to the East of the LMC; these more diffusely distributed stars are likely stripped SMC stars due to interactions with the LMC. Miras are also identified in regions of the sky away from the Clouds; we locate stars likely associated with known massive substructures, and also find potential associations with stripped SMC debris above the Galactic plane.
  • We take advantage of the deep and wide coverage of the VST ATLAS survey to study the line-of-sight structure of the Sagittarius stellar stream in the Southern hemisphere, only ~40{\deg} away from the progenitor. We use photometrically selected Sub-Giant Branch (SGB) stars to reveal a complex debris morphology of the trailing arm and detect at least two clear peaks in the SGB distance modulus distribution. The separation between the two line-of-sight components is at least 5 kpc at the edge of the VST ATLAS footprint, but appears to change along the stream, which allows us to conclude that these detections correspond to two physically independent stellar structures, rather than a mix of co-distant stellar populations within a single stream. Our discovery of a fork in the Sgr trailing arm is verified using Blue Horizontal Branch stars and our distance measurements are calibrated using RR Lyrae stars from the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey. Comparing with numerical simulations of the Sgr dwarf disruption, the more distant of the two components in the fork matches perfectly with the track of the trailing debris. However, no obvious counterpart exists in the simulation for the closer line-of-sight component.
  • The search for chemically unevolved galaxies remains prevalent in the nearby Universe, mostly because these systems provide excellent proxies for exploring in detail the physics of high-z systems. The most promising candidates are extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), i.e., galaxies with <1/10 solar metallicity. However, due to the bright emission line based search criteria traditionally used to find XMPs, we may not be sampling the full XMP population. In 2014 we reoriented this search using only morphological properties and uncovered a population of ~150 `blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies', and published a sub-sample of 12 BDD spectra. Here we present optical spectroscopic observations of a larger sample of 51 BDDs, along with their SDSS photometric properties. With our improved statistics, we use direct-method abundances to confirm that BDDs are chemically unevolved (7.43<12+log(O/H)<8.01), with ~20% of our sample classified as being XMP galaxies, and find they are actively forming stars at rates of 1-33x10^-2 M_sol/yr in HII regions randomly embedded in a blue, low-surface brightness continuum. Stellar masses are calculated from population synthesis models and estimated to be in the range log(M_star/M_sol) ~5-9. Unlike other low-metallicity star-forming galaxies, BDDs are in agreement with the mass-metallicity relation at low masses, suggesting they are not accreting large amounts of pristine gas relative to their stellar mass. BDD galaxies appear to be a population of actively star-forming dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies who fall within the class of low-surface brightness dIrr galaxies. Their ongoing star-formation and irregular morphology make them excellent analogues for galaxies in the early Universe.
  • We present the discovery and preliminary characterization of a gravitationally lensed quasar with a source redshift $z_{s}=2.74$ and image separation of $2.9"$ lensed by a foreground $z_{l}=0.40$ elliptical galaxy. Since the images of gravitationally lensed quasars are the superposition of multiple point sources and a foreground lensing galaxy, we have developed a morphology independent multi-wavelength approach to the photometric selection of lensed quasar candidates based on Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) supervised machine learning. Using this technique and $gi$ multicolour photometric observations from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), near IR $JK$ photometry from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) and WISE mid IR photometry, we have identified a candidate system with two catalogue components with $i_{AB}=18.61$ and $i_{AB}=20.44$ comprised of an elliptical galaxy and two blue point sources. Spectroscopic follow-up with NTT and the use of an archival AAT spectrum show that the point sources can be identified as a lensed quasar with an emission line redshift of $z=2.739\pm0.003$ and a foreground early type galaxy with $z=0.400\pm0.002$. We model the system as a single isothermal ellipsoid and find the Einstein radius $\theta_E \sim 1.47"$, enclosed mass $M_{enc} \sim 4 \times 10^{11}$M$_{\odot}$ and a time delay of $\sim$52 days. The relatively wide separation, month scale time delay duration and high redshift make this an ideal system for constraining the expansion rate beyond a redshift of 1.
  • We present the discovery of stellar tidal tails around the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds in the Gaia DR1 data. In between the Clouds, their tidal arms are stretched towards each other to form an almost continuous stellar bridge. Our analysis relies on the exquisite quality of the Gaia's photometric catalogue to build detailed star-count maps of the Clouds. We demonstrate that the Gaia DR1 data can be used to detect variable stars across the whole sky, and in particular, RR Lyrae stars in and around the LMC and the SMC. Additionally, we use a combination of Gaia and Gale to follow the distribution of Young Main Sequence stars in the Magellanic System. Viewed by Gaia, the Clouds show unmistakable signs of interaction. Around the LMC, clumps of RR Lyrae are observable as far as ~20 degrees, in agreement with the most recent map of Mira-like stars reported in Deason et al (2016). The SMC's outer stellar density contours show a characteristic S-shape, symptomatic of the on-set of tidal stripping. Beyond several degrees from the center of the dwarf, the Gaia RR Lyrae stars trace the Cloud's trailing arm, extending towards the LMC. This stellar tidal tail mapped with RR Lyrae is not aligned with the gaseous Magellanic Bridge, and is shifted by some ~5 degrees from the Young Main Sequence bridge. We use the offset between the bridges to put constraints on the density of the hot gaseous corona of the Milky Way.
  • We report the discovery of a substantial stellar overdensity in the periphery of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), found using public imaging from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey. The structure appears to emanate from the edge of the outer LMC disk at a radius $\approx 13.5$ degrees due north of its centre, and stretches more than $10$ kpc towards the east. It is roughly $1.5$ kpc wide and has an integrated $V$-band luminosity of at least $M_V = -7.4$. The stellar populations in the feature are indistinguishable from those in the outer LMC disk. We attempt to quantify the geometry of the outer disk using simple planar models, and find that only a disk with mild intrinsic ellipticity can simultaneously explain the observed stellar density on the sky and the azimuthal line-of-sight distance profile. We also see possible non-planar behaviour in the outer disk that may reflect a warp and/or flare, as well as deviations that resemble a ring-like structure between $\sim9-12$ degrees from the LMC centre. Based on all these observations, we conclude that our remote, stream-like feature is likely comprised of material that has been stripped from the outskirts of the LMC disk, although we cannot rule out that it represents a transient overdensity in the disk itself. We conduct a simple $N$-body simulation to show that either type of structure could plausibly arise due to the tidal force of the Milky Way; however we also recognize that a recent close interaction between the LMC and the SMC may be the source of the stripping or perturbation. Finally, we observe evidence for extremely diffuse LMC populations extending to radii of $\sim 18.5$ kpc in the disk plane ($\approx 20$ degrees on the sky), corroborating previous spectroscopic detections at comparable distances.
  • We present results from spectroscopic observations with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) of $147$ stellar targets along the line of sight to the newly-discovered `ultrafaint' stellar systems Tucana 2 (Tuc 2) and Grus 1 (Gru 1). Based on simultaneous estimates of line-of-sight velocity and stellar-atmospheric parameters, we identify 8 and 7 stars as probable members of Tuc 2 and and Gru 1, respectively. Our sample for Tuc 2 is sufficient to resolve an internal velocity dispersion of $8.6_{-2.7}^{+4.4}$ km s$^{-1}$ about a mean of $-129.1_{-3.5}^{+3.5}$ km s$^{-1}$ (solar rest frame), and to estimate a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]= $-2.23_{-0.12}^{+0.18}$. These results place Tuc 2 on chemodynamical scaling relations followed by dwarf galaxies, suggesting a dominant dark matter component with dynamical mass $2.7_{-1.3}^{+3.1}\times 10^6$ $\mathrm{M}_{\odot}$ enclosed within the central $\sim 160$ pc, and dynamical mass-to-light ratio $1900_{-900}^{+2200}$ $\mathrm{M}_{\odot}/L_{V,\odot}$. For Gru 1 we estimate a mean velocity of $-140.5_{-1.6}^{+2.4}$ km s$^{-1}$ and a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=$-1.42_{-0.42}^{+0.55}$, but our sample does not resolve Gru 1's velocity dispersion. The radial coordinates of Tuc 2 and Gru 1 in Galactic phase space suggest that their orbits are among the most energetic within distance $\leq 300$ kpc. Moreover, their proximity to each other in this space arises naturally if both objects are trailing the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • We analyze the resolved stellar populations of the faint stellar system, Crater, based on deep optical imaging taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The HST/ACS-based color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Crater extends $\sim$4 magnitudes below the oldest main sequence turnoff, providing excellent leverage on Crater's physical properties. Structurally, Crater has a half-light radius of $\sim$20 pc and shows no evidence for tidal distortions. Crater is well-described by a simple stellar population with an age of $\sim$7.5 Gyr, [M/H]$\sim-1.65$, a M$_{\star}\sim10^4$ M$_{\odot}$, M$_{\rm V}\sim -5.3$, located at a distance of d$\sim$ 145 kpc, with modest uncertainties in these properties due to differences in the underlying stellar evolution models. The sparse sampling of stars above the turnoff and sub-giant branch are likely to be 1.0-1.4 M$_{\odot}$ binary star systems (blue stragglers) and their evolved descendants, as opposed to intermediate age main sequence stars. Confusion of these populations highlights a substantial challenge in accurately characterizing sparsely populated stellar systems. Our analysis shows that Crater is not a dwarf galaxy, but instead is an unusually young cluster given its location in the Milky Way's very outer stellar halo. Crater is similar to SMC cluster Lindsay 38, and its position and velocity are in good agreement with observations and models of the Magellanic stream debris, suggesting it may have accreted from the Magellanic Clouds. However, its age and metallicity are also in agreement with the age-metallicity relationships of lower mass dwarf galaxies such as Leo I or Carina. Despite uncertainty over its progenitor system, Crater appears to have been incorporated into the Galaxy more recently than $z\sim1$ (8 Gyr ago), providing an important new constraint on the accretion history of the Milky Way. [abridged]
  • We present a search for gamma-ray emission from the direction of the newly discovered dwarf galaxy Reticulum II. Using Fermi-LAT data, we detect a signal that exceeds expected backgrounds between ~2-10 GeV and is consistent with annihilation of dark matter for particle masses less than a few x 10^2 GeV. Modeling the background as a Poisson process based on Fermi-LAT diffuse models, and taking into account trials factors, we detect emission with p-value less than 9.8 x 10^-5 (>3.7 sigma). An alternative, model-independent treatment of background reduces the significance, raising the p-value to 9.7 x 10^-3 (2.3 sigma). Even in this case, however, Reticulum II has the most significant gamma-ray signal of any known dwarf galaxy. If Reticulum II has a dark matter halo that is similar to those inferred for other nearby dwarfs, the signal is consistent with the s-wave relic abundance cross section for annihilation.
  • Photometry alone is not sufficient to unambiguously distinguish between ultra-faint star clusters and dwarf galaxies because of their overlap in morphological properties. Here we report on VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of candidate member stars in two recently discovered ultra-faint satellites Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1, obtained as part of the ongoing Gaia-ESO Survey. We identify 18 members in Reticulum 2 and 5 in Horologium 1. We find Reticulum 2 to have a velocity dispersion of ~3.22 km/s, implying a M/L ratio of ~ 500. We have inferred stellar parameters for all candidates and we find Reticulum 2 to have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.46+/-0.1, with an intrinsic dispersion of ~ 0.29, and is alpha-enhanced to the level of [alpha/Fe]~0.4. We conclude that Reticulum 2 is a dwarf galaxy. We also report on the serendipitous discovery of four stars in a previously unknown stellar substructure near Reticulum 2 with [Fe/H] ~ -2 and V_hel ~ 220 km/s, far from the systemic velocity of Reticulum 2. For Horologium 1 we infer a velocity dispersion of 4.9^{+2.8}_{-0.9} km/s and a consequent M/L ratio of ~ 600, leading us to conclude that Horologium 1 is also a dwarf galaxy. Horologium 1 is slightly more metal-poor than Reticulum 2 [Fe/H] = -2.76 +/- 0.1 and is similarly alpha-enhanced: [alpha/Fe] ~ 0.3. Despite a large error-bar, we also measure a significant spread of metallicities of 0.17 dex which strengthen the evidence that Horologium 1 is indeed a dwarf galaxy. The line-of-sight velocity of Reticulum 2 is offset by some 100 km/s from the prediction of the orbital velocity of the LMC, thus making its association with the Cloud uncertain. However, at the location of Horologium 1, both the backward integrated LMC's orbit and the LMC's halo are predicted to have radial velocities similar to that of the dwarf. Therefore, it is likely that Horologium 1 is or once was a member of the Magellanic Family.
  • We present results from spectroscopic observations with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) of 182 stellar targets along the line of sight to the newly-discovered `ultrafaint' object Reticulum 2 (Ret 2). For 38 of these targets, the spectra are sufficient to provide simultaneous estimates of line-of-sight velocity ($v_{\rm los}$, median random error $\delta_{v_{\rm los}}=1.3$ km s$^{-1}$), effective temperature ($T_{\rm eff}$, $\delta_{T_{\rm eff}}=464$ K), surface gravity ($\log g$, $\delta_{\rm logg}=0.54$ dex) and iron abundance ([Fe/H], $\delta_{\mathrm{[Fe/H]}}=0.45$ dex). We use these results to confirm 18 stars as members of Ret 2. From the member sample we estimate a velocity dispersion of $\sigma_{v_{\rm los}}=3.6_{-0.6}^{+0.9}$ km s$^{-1}$ about a mean of $\langle v_{\rm los}\rangle =64.8_{-1.0}^{+1.1}$ km s$^{-1}$ in the solar rest frame ($\sim -90.9$ km s$^{-1}$ in the Galactic rest frame), and a metallicity dispersion of $\sigma_{\rm [Fe/H]}=0.50_{-0.13}^{+0.17}$ dex about a mean of $\langle \mathrm{[Fe/H]} \rangle =-2.67_{-0.34}^{+0.34}$. These estimates marginalize over possible velocity and metallicity gradients, which are consistent with zero. Our results place Ret 2 on chemodynamical scaling relations followed by the Milky Way's dwarf-galactic satellites. Under assumptions of dynamic equilibrium and negligible contamination from binary stars---both of which must be checked with deeper imaging and repeat spectroscopic observations---the estimated velocity dispersion suggests a dynamical mass of $M(R_{\rm h})\approx 5R_{\rm h}\sigma_{v_{\rm los}}^2/(2G)=2.4_{-0.8}^{+1.3}\times 10^5$ $M_{\odot}$ enclosed within projected halflight radius $R_{\rm h}\sim 32$ pc, with mass-to-light ratio $\approx 2M(R_{\rm h})/L_{\rm V}=462_{-157}^{+264}$ in solar units.
  • We have used the publicly released Dark Energy Survey data to hunt for new satellites of the Milky Way in the Southern hemisphere. Our search yielded a large number of promising candidates. In this paper, we announce the discovery of 9 new unambiguous ultra-faint objects, whose authenticity can be established with the DES data alone. Based on the morphological properties, three of the new satellites are dwarf galaxies, one of which is located at the very outskirts of the Milky Way, at a distance of 380 kpc. The remaining 6 objects have sizes and luminosities comparable to the Segue~1 satellite and can not be classified straightforwardly without follow-up spectroscopic observations. The satellites we have discovered cluster around the LMC and the SMC. We show that such spatial distribution is unlikely under the assumption of isotropy, and, therefore, conclude that at least some of the new satellites must have been associated with the Magellanic Clouds in the past.
  • In the rest frame of the Local Group (LG), the total momentum of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) should balance to zero. We use this fact to constrain new solutions for the solar motion with respect to the LG centre-of-mass, the total mass of the LG, and the individual masses of M31 and the MW. Using the set of remote LG galaxies at $>350$ kpc from the MW and M31, we find that the solar motion has amplitude $V_{\odot}=299\pm 15 {\rm ~km~s^{-1}}$ in a direction pointing toward galactic longitude $l_{\odot}=98.4^{\circ}\pm 3.6^{\circ}$ and galactic latitude $b_{\odot}=-5.9^{\circ}\pm 3.0^{\circ}$. The velocities of M31 and the MW in this rest frame give a direct measurement of their mass ratio, for which we find $\log_{10} (M_{\rm M31}/M_{\rm MW})=0.36 \pm 0.29$. We combine these measurements with the virial theorem to estimate the total mass within the LG as $M_{\rm LG}=(2.5\pm 0.4)\times 10^{12}~{\rm M}_{\odot}$. Our value for $M_{\rm LG}$ is consistent with the sum of literature values for $M_{\rm MW}$ and $M_{\rm M31}$. This suggests that the mass of the LG is almost entirely located within the two largest galaxies rather than being dispersed on larger scales or in a background medium. The outskirts of the LG are seemingly rather empty. Combining our measurement for $M_{\rm LG}$ and the mass ratio, we estimate the individual masses of the MW and M31 to be $M_{\rm MW}=(0.8\pm 0.5)\times 10^{12}~{\rm M}_{\odot}$ and $M_{\rm M31}=(1.7\pm 0.3)\times 10^{12}~{\rm M}_{\odot}$, respectively. Our analysis favours M31 being more massive than the MW by a factor of $\sim$2.3, and the uncertainties allow only a small probability (9.8%) that the MW is more massive. This is consistent with other properties such as the maximum rotational velocities, total stellar content, and numbers of globular clusters and dwarf satellites, which all suggest that $M_{\rm M31}/M_{\rm MW}>1$.