• We present well-sampled $UBVRIJHK$ photometry of SN 2002fk starting 12 days before maximum light through 122 days after peak brightness, along with a series of 15 optical spectra from -4 to +95 days since maximum. Our observations show the presence of C II lines in the early-time spectra of SN 2002fk, expanding at ~11,000 km s$^{-1}~$ and persisting until ~8 days past maximum light with a velocity of $\sim$9,000 km s$^{-1}~$. SN 2002fk is characterized by a small velocity gradient of $\dot v_{Si~II}=26$ km s$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$, possibly caused by an off-center explosion with the ignition region oriented towards the observer. The connection between viewing angle of an off-center explosion and the presence of C II in the early time spectrum suggests that the observation of C II could be also due to a viewing angle effect. Adopting the Cepheid distance to NGC 1309 we provide the first $H_{0}$ value based on near-IR measurements of a Type Ia supernova between 63.0$\pm$ 0.8 ($\pm$ 2.8 systematic) and 66.7$\pm$1.0 ($\pm$ 3.5 systematic) km/s/Mpc, depending on the absolute magnitude/decline rate relationship adopted. It appears that the near-IR yields somewhat lower (6-9 %) $H_0$ values than the optical. It is essential to further examine this issue by (1) expanding the sample of high-quality near-IR light curves of SNe in the Hubble flow, and (2) increasing the number of nearby SNe with near-IR SN light curves and precise Cepheid distances, which affords the promise to deliver a more precise determination of $H_0$.
  • We present previously unpublished photometry of supernovae 2003gs and 2003hv. Using spectroscopically-derived corrections to the U-band photometry, we reconcile U-band light curves made from imagery with the Cerro Tololo 0.9-m, 1.3-m and Las Campanas 1-m telescopes. Previously, such light curves showed a 0.4 mag spread at one month after maximum light. This gives us hope that a set of corrected ultraviolet light curves of nearby objects can contribute to the full utilization of rest frame U-band data of supernovae at redshift ~0.3 to 0.8. As pointed out recently by Kessler et al. in the context of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey supernova search, if we take the published U-band photometry of nearby Type Ia supernovae at face value, there is a 0.12 mag U-band anomaly in the distance moduli of higher redshift objects. This anomaly led the Sloan survey to eliminate from their analyses all photometry obtained in the rest frame U-band. The Supernova Legacy Survey eliminated observer frame U-band photometry, which is to say nearby objects observed in the U-band, but they used photometry of high redshift objects no matter in which band the photons were emitted.
  • (Abridged) The presence of unburned material in the ejecta of normal Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) is investigated using early-time spectroscopy obtained by the CSP. The tell-tale signature of pristine material from a C+O white dwarf progenitor star is the presence of carbon. The most prominent carbon lines in optical spectra of SNeIa are due to C II. We find that at least 30% of the objects in the sample show an absorption at ~6300 AA which is attributed to C II 6580. An association to H_alpha is considered to be unlikely. These findings imply a larger incidence of carbon in SNeIa ejecta than previously noted. We show how observational biases and physical conditions may hide these C II lines, and account for the scarcity of previous carbon detections. This relatively large frequency of carbon detections has crucial implications on our understanding of the explosive process. The observations indicate that carbon is present merely ~1000 km s^-1 above the bulk of Si II. Spectral modeling shows the detections are consistent with a mass of carbon of 10^-3--10^-2 M_sun. This would imply substantial mixing, which may be related to asymmetries of the flame propagation or clumps of unburned material along the line of sight. However, the uniformity of the relation between C II and Si II velocities is not consistent with the latter scenario. The observational properties of SNeIa with and without carbon signatures are compared. A trend toward bluer color and lower luminosity is found for objects with carbon.
  • The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) was a five-year observational survey conducted at Las Campanas Observatory that obtained, among other things, high-quality light curves of ~100 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Presented here is the second data release of nearby SN Ia photometry consisting of 50 objects, with a subset of 45 having near-infrared follow-up observations. Thirty-three objects have optical pre-maximum coverage with a subset of 15 beginning at least 5 days before maximum light. In the near-infrared, 27 objects have coverage beginning before the epoch of B-band maximum, with a subset of 13 beginning at least 5 days before maximum. In addition, we present results of a photometric calibration program to measure the CSP optical (uBgVri)bandpasses with an accuracy of ~1%. Finally, we report the discovery of a second SN Ia, SN 2006ot, similar in its characteristics to the peculiar SN 2006bt.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometry, as well as ground-based optical spectra and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra, of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2001ay. At maximum light the Si II and Mg II lines indicated expansion velocities of 14,000 km/sec, while Si III and S II showed velocities of 9,000 km/sec There is also evidence for some unburned carbon at 12,000 km/sec. SN 2001ay exhibited a decline-rate parameter Delta m_15(B) = 0.68 \pm 0.05 mag; this and the B-band photometry at t > +25 d past maximum make it the most slowly declining Type Ia SN yet discovered. Three of four super-Chandrasekhar-mass candidates have decline rates almost as slow as this. After correction for Galactic and host-galaxy extinction, SN 2001ay had M_B = -19.19 and M_V = -19.17 mag at maximum light; thus, it was not overluminous in optical bands. In near-infrared bands it was overluminous only at the 2-sigma level at most. For a rise time of 18 d (explosion to bolometric maximum) the implied Ni-56 yield was (0.58 \pm 0.15)/alpha M_Sun, with alpha = L_max/E_Ni probably in the range 1.0 to 1.2. The Ni-56 yield is comparable to that of many Type Ia supernovae. The "normal" Ni-56 yield and the typical peak optical brightness suggest that the very broad optical light curve is explained by the trapping of the gamma rays in the inner regions.
  • Ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN) 2009bb are presented, following the flux evolution from -10 to +285 days past B-band maximum. Thanks to the very early discovery, it is possible to place tight constraints on the SN explosion epoch. The expansion velocities measured from near maximum spectra are found to be only slightly smaller than those measured from spectra of the prototype broad-lined SN 1998bw associated with GRB 980425. Fitting an analytical model to the pseudo-bolometric light curve of SN 2009bb suggests that 4.1+-1.9 Msun of material was ejected with 0.22 +-0.06 Msun of it being 56Ni. The resulting kinetic energy is 1.8+-0.7x10^52 erg. This, together with an absolute peak magnitude of MB=-18.36+-0.44, places SN 2009bb on the energetic and luminous end of the broad-lined Type Ic (SN Ic) sequence. Detection of helium in the early time optical spectra accompanied with strong radio emission, and high metallicity of its environment makes SN 2009bb a peculiar object. Similar to the case for GRBs, we find that the bulk explosion parameters of SN 2009bb cannot account for the copious energy coupled to relativistic ejecta, and conclude that another energy reservoir (a central engine) is required to power the radio emission. Nevertheless, the analysis of the SN 2009bb nebular spectrum suggests that the failed GRB detection is not imputable to a large angle between the line-of-sight and the GRB beamed radiation. Therefore, if a GRB was produced during the SN 2009bb explosion, it was below the threshold of the current generation of gamma-ray instruments.
  • In providing an independent measure of the expansion history of the Universe, the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) has observed 71 high-z Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the near-infrared bands Y and J. These can be used to construct rest-frame i-band light curves which, when compared to a low-z sample, yield distance moduli that are less sensitive to extinction and/or decline-rate corrections than in the optical. However, working with NIR observed and i-band rest frame photometry presents unique challenges and has necessitated the development of a new set of observational tools in order to reduce and analyze both the low-z and high-z CSP sample. We present in this paper the methods used to generate uBVgriYJH light-curve templates based on a sample of 24 high-quality low-z CSP SNe. We also present two methods for determining the distances to the hosts of SN Ia events. A larger sample of 30 low-z SNe Ia in the Hubble Flow are used to calibrate these methods. We then apply the method and derive distances to seven galaxies that are so nearby that their motions are not dominated by the Hubble flow.
  • We present the analysis of the first set of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project. Well-sampled, high-precision optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (NIR; YJHKs) light curves obtained in a well-understood photometric system are used to provide light-curve parameters, and ugriBVYJH template light curves. The intrinsic colors at maximum light are calibrated to compute optical--NIR color excesses for the full sample, thus allowing the properties of the reddening law in the host galaxies to be studied. A low value of Rv~1.7, is derived when using the entire sample of SNe. However, when the two highly reddened SNe in the sample are excluded, a value Galactic standard of Rv~3.2 is obtained. The colors of these two events are well matched by a reddening model due to circumstellar dust. The peak luminosities are calibrated using a two-parameter linear fit to the decline rates and the colors, or alternatively, the color excesses. In both cases, dispersions in absolute magnitude of 0.12--0.16 mag are obtained, depending on the filter-color combination. In contrast to the results obtained from color excesses, these fits give Rv~1--2, even when the two highly reddened SNe are excluded. This discrepancy suggests that, beyond the "normal" interstellar reddening produced in the host galaxies, there is an intrinsic dispersion in the colors of SNe Ia which is correlated with luminosity but independent of the decline rate. Finally, a Hubble diagram is produced by combining the results of the fits for each filter. The resulting scatter of 0.12 mag appears to be limited by peculiar velocities as evidenced by the strong correlation between the distance-modulus residuals among the different filters. The implication is that the actual precision of SN Ia distances is 3--4%.
  • The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is a five-year survey being carried out at the Las Campanas Observatory to obtain high-quality light curves of ~100 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae in a well-defined photometric system. Here we present the first release of photometric data that contains the optical light curves of 35 Type Ia supernovae, and near-infrared light curves for a subset of 25 events. The data comprise 5559 optical (ugriBV) and 1043 near-infrared (YJHKs) data points in the natural system of the Swope telescope. Twenty-eight supernovae have pre-maximum data, and for 15 of these, the observations begin at least 5 days before B maximum. This is one of the most accurate datasets of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae published to date. When completed, the CSP dataset will constitute a fundamental reference for precise determinations of cosmological parameters, and serve as a rich resource for comparison with models of Type Ia supernovae.
  • We obtained optical photometry of SN 2003gs on 49 nights, from 2 to 494 days after T(B_max). We also obtained near-IR photometry on 21 nights. SN 2003gs was the first fast declining Type Ia SN that has been well observed since SN 1999by. While it was subluminous in optical bands compared to more slowly declining Type Ia SNe, it was not subluminous at maximum light in the near-IR bands. There appears to be a bimodal distribution in the near-IR absolute magnitudes of Type Ia SNe at maximum light. Those that peak in the near-IR after T(B_max) are subluminous in the all bands. Those that peak in the near-IR prior to T(B_max), such as SN 2003gs, have effectively the same near-IR absolute magnitudes at maximum light regardless of the decline rate Delta m_15(B). Near-IR spectral evidence suggests that opacities in the outer layers of SN 2003gs are reduced much earlier than for normal Type Ia SNe. That may allow gamma rays that power the luminosity to escape more rapidly and accelerate the decline rate. This conclusion is consistent with the photometric behavior of SN 2003gs in the IR, which indicates a faster than normal decline from approximately normal peak brightness.
  • Optical and near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy are reported for SN 2003bg, starting a few days after explosion and extending for a period of more than 300 days. Our early-time spectra reveal the presence of broad, high-velocity Balmer lines. The nebular-phase spectra, on the other hand, show a remarkable resemblance to those of Type Ib/c supernovae, without clear evidence for hydrogen. Near maximum brightness SN 2003bg displayed a bolometric luminosity comparable to that of other Type I hypernovae unrelated to gamma-ray bursts, implying a rather normal amount of 56Ni production (0.1-0.2 Msun) compared with other such objects. The bolometric light curve of SN 2003bg, on the other hand, is remarkably broad, thus suggesting a relatively large progenitor mass at the moment of explosion. These observations, together with the large value of the kinetic energy of expansion established in the accompanying paper (Mazzali et al. 2009), suggest that SN 2003bg can be regarded as a Type IIb hypernova.
  • A detailed study spanning approximately a year has been conducted on the Type Ib supernova 2007Y. Imaging was obtained from X-ray to radio wavelengths, and a comprehensive set of multi-band (w2m2w1u'g'r'i'UBVYJHKs) light curves and optical spectroscopy is presented. A virtually complete bolometric light curve is derived, from which we infer a (56)Ni-mass of 0.06 M_sun. The early spectrum strongly resembles SN 2005bf and exhibits high-velocity features of CaII and H_alpha; during late epochs the spectrum shows evidence of a ejecta-wind interaction. Nebular emission lines have similar widths and exhibit profiles that indicate a lack of major asymmetry in the ejecta. Late phase spectra are modeled with a non-LTE code, from which we find (56)Ni, O and total-ejecta masses (excluding He) to be 0.06, 0.2 and 0.42 M_sun, respectively, below 4,500 km/s. The (56)Ni mass confirms results obtained from the bolometric light curve. The oxygen abundance suggests the progenitor was most likely a ~3.3 M_sun He core star that evolved from a zero-age-main-sequence mass of 10-13 M_sun. The explosion energy is determined to be ~10^50 erg, and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor is constrained from X-ray and radio observations to be <~10^-6 M_sun/yr. SN 2007Y is among the least energetic normal Type Ib supernovae ever studied.
  • We present infrared photometry of SN 1999em, plus optical photometry, infrared photometry, and optical spectroscopy of SN 2003hn. Both objects were Type II-P supernovae. The V-[RIJHK] color curves of these supernovae evolved in a very similar fashion until the end of plateau phase. This allows us to determine how much more extinction the light of SN 2003hn suffered compared to SN 1999em. Since we have an estimate of the total extinction suffered by SN 1999em from model fits of ground-based and space-based spectra as well as photometry of SN 1999em, we can estimate the total extinction and absolute magnitudes of SN 2003hn with reasonable accuracy. Since the host galaxy of SN 2003hn also produced the Type Ia SN 2001el, we can directly compare the absolute magnitudes of these two SNe of different types.
  • We present u'g'r'i'BV photometry and optical spectroscopy of the Type Ib/Ic SN 2005bf covering the first ~100 days following discovery. The u'g'BV light curves displayed a double-peaked morphology, which is among Type Ib/Ic supernovae. The bolometric light curve indicates that SN 2005bf was a remarkably luminous event. Spectroscopically, SN 2005bf underwent a unique transformation from a Type Ic-like event at early times to a typical Type Ib supernova at later phases. The initial maximum in u'g'BV was accompanied by the presence in the spectrum of high velocity absorption lines of Fe II, Ca II, and H I. The photospheric velocity derived from spectra at early epochs was unusually low compared with ordinary Type Ib supernovae. We describe one-dimensional computer simulations which attempt to account for these remarkable properties. The most favored model is that of a very energetic (2 x 10^{51} erg), asymmetric explosion of a massive (8.3 M_sun) Wolf-Rayet WN star that had lost most of its hydrogen envelope. We speculate that an unobserved relativistic jet was launched producing a two-component explosion consisting of 1) a polar explosion containing a small fraction of the total mass and moving at high velocity, and 2) the explosion of the rest of the star. At first, only the polar explosion is observed, producing the initial maximum and the high velocity absorption-line spectrum resembling a Type Ic event. At late times, this fast-moving component becomes optically-thin, revealing the slower-moving explosion of the rest of the star and transforming the observed spectrum to that of a typical Type Ib supernova. If this scenario is correct, then SN 2005bf is the best example to date of a transition object between normal Type Ib/Ic supernovae and gamma ray bursts.
  • Supernovae are essential to understanding the chemical evolution of the Universe. Type Ia supernovae also provide the most powerful observational tool currently available for studying the expansion history of the Universe and the nature of dark energy. Our basic knowledge of supernovae comes from the study of their photometric and spectroscopic properties. However, the presently available data sets of optical and near-infrared light curves of supernovae are rather small and/or heterogeneous, and employ photometric systems that are poorly characterized. Similarly, there are relatively few supernovae whose spectral evolution has been well sampled, both in wavelength and phase, with precise spectrophotometric observations. The low-redshift portion of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) seeks to remedy this situation by providing photometry and spectrophotometry of a large sample of supernovae taken on telescope/filter/detector systems that are well understood and well characterized. During a five-year program which began in September 2004, we expect to obtain high-precision u'g'r'i'BVYJHKs light curves and optical spectrophotometry for about 250 supernovae of all types. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the CSP survey observing and data reduction methodology. In addition, we present preliminary photometry and spectra obtained for a few representative supernovae during the first observing campaign.
  • We present near infrared photometry of the Type Ia supernova 1999ee; also, optical and infrared photometry of the Type Ia SNe 2000bh, 2000ca, and 2001ba. For SNe 1999ee and 2000bh we present the first-ever SN photometry at 1.035 microns (the Y-band). We present K-corrections which transform the infrared photometry in the observer's frame to the supernova rest frame. Using our infrared K-corrections and stretch factors derived from optical photometry, we construct JHK templates which can be used to determine the apparent magnitudes at maximum if one has some data in the window -12 to +10 d with respect to T(B_max). Following up previous work on the uniformity of V minus IR loci of Type Ia supernovae of mid-range decline rates, we present unreddened loci for slow decliners. We also discuss evidence for a continuous change of color at a given epoch as a function of decline rate.
  • We present well sampled optical (UBVRI) and infrared (JHK) light curves of the nearby (~18.0 Mpc) Type Ia supernova SN 2001el, from 11 days before to 142 days after the time of B-band maximum. The data represent one of the best sets of optical and infrared photometry ever obtained for a Type Ia supernova. Based on synthetic photometry using optical spectra of SN 2001el and optical and infrared spectra of SN 1999ee, we were able to devise filter corrections for the BVJHK photometry of SN 2001el which to some extent resolve systematic differences between SN 2001el datasets obtained with different telescope/filter/instrument combinations. We also calculated V minus infrared color curves on the basis of a delayed detonation model and showed that the theoretical color curves match the unreddened loci for Type Ia SNe with mid-range decline rates to within 0.2 mag. Given the completeness of the light curves and the elimination of filter-oriented systematic errors to some degree, the data presented here will be useful for the construction of photometric templates, especially in the infrared. On the whole the photometric behavior of SN 2001el was quite normal. The second H-band maximum being brighter than the first H-band maximum is in accord with the prediction of Krisciunas et al. (2000) for Type Ia SNe with mid-range decline rates. The photometry exhibits non-zero host extinction, with total A_V = 0.57 +/- 0.05 mag along the line of sight. NGC 1448, the host of SN 2001el, would be an excellent target for a distance determination using Cepheids.