• In the current data-driven science era, it is needed that data analysis techniques has to quickly evolve to face with data whose dimensions has increased up to the Petabyte scale. In particular, being modern astrophysics based on multi-wavelength data organized into large catalogues, it is crucial that the astronomical catalog cross-matching methods, strongly dependant from the catalogues size, must ensure efficiency, reliability and scalability. Furthermore, multi-band data are archived and reduced in different ways, so that the resulting catalogues may differ each other in formats, resolution, data structure, etc, thus requiring the highest generality of cross-matching features. We present $C^{3}$ (Command-line Catalogue Cross-match), a multi-platform application designed to efficiently cross-match massive catalogues from modern surveys. Conceived as a stand-alone command-line process or a module within generic data reduction/analysis pipeline, it provides the maximum flexibility, in terms of portability, configuration, coordinates and cross-matching types, ensuring high performance capabilities by using a multi-core parallel processing paradigm and a sky partitioning algorithm.
  • The degradation of spatial resolution in star-forming regions observed at large distances ($d\gtrsim1$ kpc) with Herschel,can lead to estimates of the physical parameters of the detected compact sources (clumps) which do not necessarily mirror the properties of the original population of cores. This paper aims at quantifying the bias introduced in the estimation of these parameters by the distance effect. To do so, we consider Herschel maps of nearby star-forming regions taken from the Herschel-Gould-Belt survey, and simulate the effect of increased distance to understand what amount of information is lost when a distant star-forming region is observed with Herschel resolution. In the maps displaced to different distances we extract compact sources, and we derive their physical parameters as if they were original Hi-GAL maps of the extracted source samples. In this way, we are able to discuss how the main physical properties change with distance. In particular, we discuss the ability of clumps to form massive stars: we estimate the fraction of distant sources that are classified as high-mass stars-forming objects due to their position in the mass vs radius diagram, that are only "false positives". We give also a threshold for high-mass star-formation $M>1282 \ \left(\frac{r}{[\mathrm{pc}]}\right)^{1.42} M_{\odot}$. In conclusion, this paper provides the astronomer dealing with Herschel maps of distant star-forming regions with a set of prescriptions to partially recover the character of the core population in unresolved clumps.
  • Modern Astrophysics is based on multi-wavelength data organized into large and heterogeneous catalogues. Hence, the need for efficient, reliable and scalable catalogue cross-matching methods plays a crucial role in the era of the petabyte scale. Furthermore, multi-band data have often very different angular resolution, requiring the highest generality of cross-matching features, mainly in terms of region shape and resolution. In this work we present $C^{3}$ (Command-line Catalogue Cross-match), a multi-platform application designed to efficiently cross-match massive catalogues. It is based on a multi-core parallel processing paradigm and conceived to be executed as a stand-alone command-line process or integrated within any generic data reduction/analysis pipeline, providing the maximum flexibility to the end-user, in terms of portability, parameter configuration, catalogue formats, angular resolution, region shapes, coordinate units and cross-matching types. Using real data, extracted from public surveys, we discuss the cross-matching capabilities and computing time efficiency also through a direct comparison with some publicly available tools, chosen among the most used within the community, and representative of different interface paradigms. We verified that the $C^{3}$ tool has excellent capabilities to perform an efficient and reliable cross-matching between large datasets. Although the elliptical cross-match and the parametric handling of angular orientation and offset are known concepts in the astrophysical context, their availability in the presented command-line tool makes $C^{3}$ competitive in the context of public astronomical tools.
  • The emerging need for efficient, reliable and scalable astronomical catalog cross-matching is becoming more pressing in the current data-driven science era, where the size of data has rapidly increased up to the Petabyte scale. C3 (Command-line Catalogue Cross-matching) is a multi-platform tool designed to efficiently cross-match massive catalogues from modern astronomical surveys, ensuring high-performance capabilities through the use of a multi-core parallel processing paradigm. The tool has been conceived to be executed as a stand-alone command-line process or integrated within any generic data reduction/analysis pipeline, providing the maximum flexibility to the end user, in terms of parameter configuration, coordinates and cross-matching types. In this work we present the architecture and the features of the tool. Moreover, since the modular design of the tool enables an easy customization to specific use cases and requirements, we present also an example of a customized C3 version designed and used in the FP7 project ViaLactea, dedicated to cross-correlate Hi-GAL clumps with multi-band compact sources.
  • The aims are to investigate the clustering of the far-infrared sources from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) in the Galactic longitude range of -71 to 67 deg. These clumps, and their spatial distribution, are an imprint of the original conditions within a molecular cloud. This will produce a catalogue of over-densities. The minimum spanning tree (MST) method was used to identify the over-densities in two dimensions. The catalogue was further refined by folding in heliocentric distances, resulting in more reliable over-densities, which are cluster candidates. We found 1,633 over-densities with more than ten members. Of these, 496 are defined as cluster candidates because of the reliability of the distances, with a further 1,137 potential cluster candidates. The spatial distributions of the cluster candidates are different in the first and fourth quadrants, with all clusters following the spiral structure of the Milky Way. The cluster candidates are fractal. The clump mass functions of the clustered and isolated are statistically indistinguishable from each other and are consistent with Kroupa's initial mass function.
  • We present an innovative method called FilExSeC (Filaments Extraction, Selection and Classification), a data mining tool developed to investigate the possibility to refine and optimize the shape reconstruction of filamentary structures detected with a consolidated method based on the flux derivative analysis, through the column-density maps computed from Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) observations of the Galactic plane. The present methodology is based on a feature extraction module followed by a machine learning model (Random Forest) dedicated to select features and to classify the pixels of the input images. From tests on both simulations and real observations the method appears reliable and robust with respect to the variability of shape and distribution of filaments. In the cases of highly defined filament structures, the presented method is able to bridge the gaps among the detected fragments, thus improving their shape reconstruction. From a preliminary "a posteriori" analysis of derived filament physical parameters, the method appears potentially able to add a sufficient contribution to complete and refine the filament reconstruction.
  • The VIALACTEA project has a work package dedicated to Tools and Infrastructure and, inside it, a task for the Database and Virtual Observatory Infrastructure. This task aims at providing an infrastructure to store all the resources needed by the, more purposely, scientific work packages of the project itself. This infrastructure includes a combination of: storage facilities, relational databases and web services on top of them, and has taken, as a whole, the name of VIALACTEA Knowledge Base (VLKB). This contribution illustrates the current status of this VLKB. It details the set of data resources put together; describes the database that allows data discovery through VO inspired metadata maintenance; illustrates the discovery, cutout and access services built on top of the former two for the users to exploit the data content.
  • The evolutionary classification of massive clumps that are candidate progenitors of high-mass young stars and clusters relies on a variety of independent diagnostics based on observables from the near-infrared to the radio. A promising evolutionary indicator for massive and dense cluster-progenitor clumps is the L/M ratio between the bolometric luminosity and the mass of the clumps. With the aim of providing a quantitative calibration for this indicator we used SEPIA/APEX to obtain CH3C2H(12-11) observations, that is an excellent thermometer molecule probing densities > 10^5 cm^-3 , toward 51 dense clumps with M>1000 solar masses, and uniformly spanning -2 < Log(L/M) < 2.3. We identify three distinct ranges of L/M that can be associated to three distinct phases of star formation in massive clumps. For L/M <1 no clump is detected in CH3C2H , suggesting an inner envelope temperature below 30K. For 1< L/M < 10 we detect 58% of the clumps, with a temperature between 30 and 35 K independently from the exact value of L/M; such clumps are building up luminosity due to the formation of stars, but no star is yet able to significantly heat the inner clump regions. For L/M> 10 we detect all the clumps, with a gas temperature rising with Log(L/M), marking the appearance of a qualitatively different heating source within the clumps; such values are found towards clumps with UCHII counterparts, suggesting that the quantitative difference in T - L/M behaviour above L/M >10 is due to the first appearance of ZAMS stars in the clumps.
  • The physical mechanisms that induce the transformation of a certain mass of gas in new stars are far from being well understood. Infrared bubbles associated with HII regions have been considered to be good samples of investigating triggered star formation. In this paper we report on the investigation of the dust properties of the infrared bubble N4 around the HII region G11.898+0.747, analyzing its interaction with its surroundings and star formation histories therein, with the aim of determining the possibility of star formation triggered by the expansion of the bubble. Using Herschel PACS and SPIRE images with a wide wavelength coverage, we reveal the dust properties over the entire bubble. Meanwhile, we are able to identify six dust clumps surrounding the bubble, with a mean size of 0.50 pc, temperature of about 22 K, mean column density of 1.7 $\times10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$, mean volume density of about 4.4 $\times10^{4}$ cm$^{-3}$, and a mean mass of 320 $M_{\odot}$. In addition, from PAH emission seen at 8 $\mu$m, free-free emission detected at 20 cm and a probability density function in special regions, we could identify clear signatures of the influence of the HII region on the surroundings. There are hints of star formation, though further investigation is required to demonstrate that N4 is the triggering source.
  • The VIALACTEA project aims at building a predictive model of star formation in our galaxy. We present the innovative integrated framework and the main technologies and methodologies to reach this ambitious goal.
  • We report high resolution observations of the $^{12}$CO$(1\rightarrow0)$ and $^{13}$CO$(1\rightarrow0)$ molecular lines in the Carina Nebula and the Gum 31 region obtained with the 22-m Mopra telescope as part of the The Mopra Southern Galactic Plane CO Survey. We cover 8 deg$^2$ from $l = 285^{\circ}$ to 290$^{\circ}$, and from $b = -1.5^{\circ}$ to +0.5$^{\circ}$. The molecular gas column density distributions from both tracers have a similar range of values. By fitting a grey-body function to the observed infrared spectral energy distribution from Herschel maps, we derive gas column densities and dust temperatures. The gas column density has values in the range from $6.3\times\ 10^{20}$ to $1.4\times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, while the dust temperature has values in the range from 17 to 43 K. The gas column density derived from the dust emission is approximately described by a log-normal function for a limited range of column densities. A high-column density tail is clearly evident for the gas column density distribution, which appears to be a common feature in regions with active star formation. There are regional variations in the fraction of the mass recovered by the CO emission lines with respect to the total mass traced by the dust emission. These variations may be related to changes in the radiation field strength, variation of the atomic to molecular gas fraction across the observed region, differences in the CO molecule abundance with respect to H$_{2}$, and evolutionary stage differences of the molecular clouds that compose the Carina Nebula-Gum 31 complex.
  • We use the Herschel Hi-GAL survey data to study the spatial distribution in Galactic longitude and latitude of the interstellar medium and of dense, star-forming clumps in the inner Galaxy. The peak position and width of the latitude distribution of the dust column density as well as of number density of compact sources from the band-merged Hi-GAL photometric catalogues are analysed as a function of longitude. The width of the diffuse dust column density traced by the Hi-GAL 500 micron emission varies across the inner Galaxy, with a mean value of 1{\deg}.2-1{\deg}.3, similar to that of the 250um Hi-GAL sources. 70um Hi-GAL sources define a much thinner disk, with a mean FWHM of 0{\deg}.75, and an average latitude of b=0{\deg}.06, coincident with the results from ATLASGAL. The GLAT distribution as a function of GLON shows modulations, both for the diffuse emission and for the compact sources, with ~0{\deg}.2 displacements mostly toward negative latitudes at l~ +40{\deg}, +12{\deg}, -25{\deg} and -40{\deg}. No such modulations can be found in the MIPSGAL 24 or WISE 22 um data when the entire source samples are considered. The distortions revealed by Herschel are interpreted as large-scale bending modes of the Plane. The lack of similar distortions in tracers of more evolved YSOs or stars rules out gravitational instabilities or satellite-induced perturbations, as they should act on both the diffuse and stellar disk components. We propose that the observed bends are caused by incoming flows of extra-planar gas interacting with the gaseous disk. Stars decouple from the gaseous ISM and relax into the stellar disk potential. The time required for the disappearance of the distortions from the diffuse ISM to the relatively evolved YSO stages are compatible with star-formation timescales.
  • The ubiquity of filamentary structure at various scales through out the Galaxy has triggered a renewed interest in their formation, evolution, and role in star formation. The largest filaments can reach up to Galactic scale as part of the spiral arm structure. However, such large scale filaments are hard to identify systematically due to limitations in identifying methodology (i.e., as extinction features). We present a new approach to directly search for the largest, coldest, and densest filaments in the Galaxy, making use of sensitive Herschel Hi-GAL data complemented by spectral line cubes. We present a sample of the 9 most prominent Herschel filaments, including 6 identified from a pilot search field plus 3 from outside the field. These filaments measure 37-99 pc long and 0.6-3.0 pc wide with masses (0.5-8.3)$\times10^4 \, M_\odot$, and beam-averaged ($28"$, or 0.4-0.7 pc) peak H$_2$ column densities of (1.7-9.3)$\times 10^{22} \, \rm{cm^{-2}}$. The bulk of the filaments are relatively cold (17-21 K), while some local clumps have a dust temperature up to 25-47 K. All the filaments are located within <~60 pc from the Galactic mid-plane. Comparing the filaments to a recent spiral arm model incorporating the latest parallax measurements, we find that 7/9 of them reside within arms, but most are close to arm edges. These filaments are comparable in length to the Galactic scale height and therefore are not simply part of a grander turbulent cascade.
  • The SKA will be a state of the art radiotelescope optimized for both large area surveys as well as for deep pointed observations. In this paper we analyze the impact that the SKA will have on Galactic studies, starting from the immense legacy value of the all-sky survey proposed by the continuum SWG but also presenting some areas of Galactic Science that particularly benefit from SKA observations both surveys and pointed. The planned all-sky survey will be characterized by unique spatial resolution, sensitivity and survey speed, providing us with a wide-field atlas of the Galactic continuum emission. Synergies with existing, current and planned radio Galactic Plane surveys will be discussed. SKA will give the opportunity to create a sensitive catalog of discrete Galactic radio sources, most of them representing the interaction of stars at various stages of their evolution with the environment: complete census of all stage of HII regions evolution; complete census of late stages of stellar evolution such as PNe and SNRs; detection of stellar winds, thermal jets, Symbiotic systems, Chemically Peculiar and dMe stars, active binary systems in both flaring and quiescent states. Coherent emission events like Cyclotron Maser in the magnetospheres of different classes of stars can be detected. Pointed, deep observations will allow new insights into the physics of the coronae and plasma processes in active stellar systems and single stars, enabling the detection of flaring activity in larger stellar population for a better comprehension of the mechanism of energy release in the atmospheres of stars with different masses and age.
  • High-energy phenomena in the cosmos, and in particular processes leading to the emission of gamma- rays in the energy range 10 MeV - 100 GeV, play a very special role in the understanding of our Universe. This energy range is indeed associated with non-thermal phenomena and challenging particle acceleration processes. The technology involved in detecting gamma-rays is challenging and drives our ability to develop improved instruments for a large variety of applications. GAMMA-LIGHT is a Small Mission which aims at an unprecedented advance of our knowledge in many sectors of astrophysical and Earth studies research. The Mission will open a new observational window in the low-energy gamma-ray range 10-50 MeV, and is configured to make substantial advances compared with the previous and current gamma-ray experiments (AGILE and Fermi). The improvement is based on an exquisite angular resolution achieved by GAMMA-LIGHT using state-of-the-art Silicon technology with innovative data acquisition. GAMMA-LIGHT will address all astrophysics issues left open by the current generation of instruments. In particular, the breakthrough angular resolution in the energy range 100 MeV - 1 GeV is crucial to resolve patchy and complex features of diffuse sources in the Galaxy as well as increasing the point source sensitivity. This proposal addresses scientific topics of great interest to the community, with particular emphasis on multifrequency correlation studies involving radio, optical, IR, X-ray, soft gamma-ray and TeV emission. At the end of this decade several new observatories will be operational including LOFAR, SKA, ALMA, HAWK, CTA. GAMMA-LIGHT will "fill the vacuum" in the 10 MeV-10 GeV band, and will provide invaluable data for the understanding of cosmic and terrestrial high-energy sources.
  • The cycling of material from the interstellar medium (ISM) into stars and the return of stellar ejecta into the ISM is the engine that drives the "galactic ecology" in normal spirals, a cornerstone in the formation and evolution of galaxies through cosmic time. Major observational and theoretical challenges need to be addressed in determining the processes responsible for converting the low-density ISM into dense molecular clouds, forming dense filaments and clumps, fragmenting them into stars, OB associations and bound clusters, and characterizing the feedback that limits the rate and efficiency of star formation. This formidable task can be now effectively attacked thanks to the combination of new global-scale surveys of the Milky Way Galactic Plane from infrared to radio wavelengths, offering the possibility of bridging the gap between local and extragalactic star formation studies. The Herschel, Spitzer and WISE mid to far infrared continuum surveys, complemented by analogue surveys from ground-based facilities in the millimetre and radio wavelengths, enables us to measure the Galactic distribution and physical properties of dust on all scales and in all components of the ISM from diffuse clouds to filamentary complexes and tens of thousands of dense clumps. A complementary suite of spectroscopic surveys in various atomic and molecular tracers is providing the chemical fingerprinting of dense clumps and filaments, as well as essential kinematic information to derive distances and thus transform panoramic data into a 3D representation. The latest results emerging from these Galaxy-scale surveys are reviewed. New insights into cloud formation and evolution, filaments and their relationship to channeling gas onto gravitationally-bound clumps, the properties of these clumps, density thresholds for gravitational collapse, and star and cluster formation rates are discussed.
  • Herschel FIR continuum data obtained as part of the Hi-GAL survey have been used, together with the GLIMPSE 8 $\mu$m and MIPSGAL 24 $\mu$m data, to attempt the first 3D-decomposition of dust emission associated with atomic, molecular and ionized gas at 15 arcmin angular resolution. Our initial test case is a 2$\times$2 square degrees region centred on (l,b)=(30$^{\circ}$,0$^{\circ}$), a direction that encompasses the origin point of the Scutum-Crux Arm at the tip of the Galactic Bar. Coupling the IR maps with velocity maps specific for different gas phases (HI 21cm, $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO, and RRLs), we estimate the properties of dust blended with each of the gas components and at different Galactocentric distances along the LOS. A statistical Pearson's coefficients analysis is used to study the correlation between the column densities and the intensity of the IR emission. This analysis provides evidence that the 2$\times$2 square degree field under consideration is characterized by the presence of a gas component not accounted for by the standard tracers, possibly associated with warm H$_{2}$ and cold HI. We demonstrate that the IR radiation in the range 8 $\mu$m $<$ $\lambda$ $<$ 500 $\mu$m is systematically dominated by emission originating within the Scutum-Crux Arm. By applying an inversion method, we recover the dust emissivities associated with atomic, molecular and ionized gas. Using the DustEM model we obtain an indication for PAHs depletion in the diffuse ionized gas. However, the main goal of this work is to discuss the impact of the missing column density associated with the dark gas component on the accurate evaluation of the dust properties, and to shed light on the limitations of the inversion method approach when this is applied to a small section of the Galactic Plane and when the working resolution allows sufficient de-blending of the gas components along the LOS.
  • Young massive clusters (YMCs) with stellar masses of 10^4 - 10^5 Msun and core stellar densities of 10^4 - 10^5 stars per cubic pc are thought to be the `missing link' between open clusters and extreme extragalactic super star clusters and globular clusters. As such, studying the initial conditions of YMCs offers an opportunity to test cluster formation models across the full cluster mass range. G0.253+0.016 is an excellent candidate YMC progenitor. We make use of existing multi-wavelength data including recently available far-IR continuum (Herschel/Hi-GAL) and mm spectral line (HOPS and MALT90) data and present new, deep, multiple-filter, near-IR (VLT/NACO) observations to study G0.253+0.016. These data show G0.253+0.016 is a high mass (1.3x10^5 Msun), low temperature (T_dust~20K), high volume and column density (n ~ 8x10^4 cm^-3; N_{H_2} ~ 4x10^23 cm^-2) molecular clump which is close to virial equilibrium (M_dust ~ M_virial) so is likely to be gravitationally-bound. It is almost devoid of star formation and, thus, has exactly the properties expected for the initial conditions of a clump that may form an Arches-like massive cluster. We compare the properties of G0.253+0.016 to typical Galactic cluster-forming molecular clumps and find it is extreme, and possibly unique in the Galaxy. This uniqueness makes detailed studies of G0.253+0.016 extremely important for testing massive cluster formation models.
  • The molecular clouds Lupus 1, 3 and 4 were mapped with the Mopra telescope at 3 and 12 mm. Emission lines from high density molecular tracers were detected, i.e. NH$_3$ (1,1), NH$_3$ (2,2), N$_2$H$^+$ (1-0), HC$_3$N (3-2), HC$_3$N (10-9), CS (2-1), CH$_3$OH (2$_0-1_0$)A$^+$ and CH$_3$OH (2$_{-1}-1_{-1}$)E. Velocity gradients of more than 1 km s$^{-1}$ are present in Lupus 1 and 3 and multiple gas components are present in these clouds along some lines of sight. Lupus 1 is the cloud richest in high density cores, 8 cores were detected in it, 5 cores were detected in Lupus 3 and only 2 in Lupus 4. The intensity of the three species HC$_3$N, NH$_3$ and N$_2$H$^+$ changes significantly in the various cores: cores that are brighter in HC$_3$N are fainter or undetected in NH$_3$ and N$_2$H$^+$ and vice versa. We found that the column density ratios HC$_3$N/N$_2$H$^+$ and HC$_3$N/NH$_3$ change by one order of magnitude between the cores, indicating that also the chemical abundance of these species is different. The time dependent chemical code that we used to model our cores shows that the HC$_3$N/N$_2$H$^+$ and HC$_3$N/NH$_3$ ratios decrease with time therefore the observed column density of these species can be used as an indicator of the chemical evolution of dense cores. On this base we classified 5 out of 8 cores in Lupus 1 and 1 out of 5 cores in Lupus 3 as very young protostars or prestellar cores. Comparing the millimetre cores population with the population of the more evolved young stellar objects identified in the Spitzer surveys, we conclude that in Lupus 3 the bulk of the star formation activity has already passed and only a moderate number of stars are still forming. On the contrary, in Lupus 1 star formation is on-going and several dense cores are still in the pre--/proto--stellar phase. Lupus 4 is at an intermediate stage, with a smaller number of individual objects.
  • We present the first Herschel PACS and SPIRE results of the Vela C molecular complex in the far-infrared and submillimetre regimes at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 um, spanning the peak of emission of cold prestellar or protostellar cores. Column density and multi-resolution analysis (MRA) differentiates the Vela C complex into five distinct sub-regions. Each sub-region displays differences in their column density and temperature probability distribution functions (PDFs), in particular, the PDFs of the `Centre-Ridge' and `South-Nest' sub-regions appear in stark contrast to each other. The Centre-Ridge displays a bimodal temperature PDF representative of hot gas surrounding the HII region RCW 36 and the cold neighbouring filaments, whilst the South-Nest is dominated by cold filamentary structure. The column density PDF of the Centre-Ridge is flatter than the South-Nest, with a high column density tail, consistent with formation through large-scale flows, and regulation by self-gravity. At small to intermediate scales MRA indicates the Centre-Ridge to be twice as concentrated as the South-Nest, whilst on larger scales, a greater portion of the gas in the South-Nest is dominated by turbulence than in the Centre-Ridge. In Vela C, high-mass stars appear to be preferentially forming in ridges, i.e., dominant high column density filaments.
  • (Abridged) We present a new method for detecting and measuring compact sources in conditions of intense, and highly variable, fore/background. While all most commonly used packages carry out the source detection over the signal image, our proposed method builds from the measured image a "curvature" image by double-differentiation in four different directions. In this way point-like as well as resolved, yet relatively compact, objects are easily revealed while the slower varying fore/background is greatly diminished. Candidate sources are then identified by looking for pixels where the curvature exceeds, in absolute terms, a given threshold; the methodology easily allows us to pinpoint breakpoints in the source brightness profile and then derive reliable guesses for the sources extent. Identified peaks are fit with 2D elliptical Gaussians plus an underlying planar inclined plateau, with mild constraints on size and orientation. Mutually contaminating sources are fit with multiple Gaussians simultaneously using flexible constraints. We ran our method on simulated large-scale fields with 1000 sources of different peak flux overlaid on a realistic realization of diffuse background. We find detection rates in excess of 90% for sources with peak fluxes above the 3-sigma signal noise limit; for about 80% of the sources the recovered peak fluxes are within 30% of their input values.
  • [Abridged] Twenty-six high-luminosity IRAS sources believed to be collection of stars in the early phases of high-mass star formation have been observed in the NIR (J, H, K) to characterize the clustering properties of their young stellar population and gain insight into the initial conditions of star formation in these clusters (Initial Mass Function [IMF], Star Formation History [SFH]), and to deduce mean values for cluster ages. K luminosity functions (KLFs) are compared with simulated ones from a model that generates populations of synthetic clusters starting from assumptions on the IMF, the SFH, and the Pre-MS evolution, and using the average properties of the observed clusters as boundary conditions Twenty-two sources show evidence of clustering from a few up to several tens of objects, and a median cluster radius of 0.7 pc. A considerable number of cluster members present an infrared excess characteristic of young Pre-Main-Sequence objects. We find that the median stellar age ranges between 2.5 10^5 and 5 10^6 years, with evidence of an age spread of the same entity within each cluster. We also find evidence that older clusters tend to be smaller in size, in line with the fact that our clusters are on average larger than those around relatively older Herbig Ae/Be stars. The relationship of the mass of the most massive star in the cluster with both the clusters richness and their total stellar mass suggest that our modeled clusters may not be consistent with them resulting from random sampling of the IMF. Our results are consistent with a star formation which takes place continuously over a period of time which is longer than a typical crossing time.
  • In an ongoing effort to identify and study high-mass protostellar candidates we have observed in various tracers a sample of 235 sources selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalog, mostly with dec < -30 deg, with the SEST antenna at millimeter wavelengths. The sample contains 142 Low sources and 93 High, which are believed to be in different evolutionary stages. Both sub-samples have been studied in detail by comparing their physical properties and morphologies. Massive dust clumps have been detected in all but 8 regions, with usually more than one clump per region. The dust emission shows a variety of complex morphologies, sometimes with multiple clumps forming filaments or clusters. The mean clump has a linear size of ~0.5 pc, a mass of ~320 Msolar for a dust temperature Td=30 K, an H_2 density of 9.5E5 cm-3, and a surface density of 0.4 g cm-2. The median values are 0.4 pc, 102 Msolar, 4E4 cm-3, and 0.14 g cm-2, respectively. The mean value of the luminosity-to-mass ratio, L/M ~99 Lsolar/Msolar, suggests that the sources are in a young, pre-ultracompact HII phase. We have compared the millimeter continuum maps with images of the mid-IR MSX emission, and have discovered 95 massive millimeter clumps non-MSX emitters, either diffuse or point-like, that are potential prestellar or precluster cores. The physical properties of these clumps are similar to those of the others, apart from the mass that is ~3 times lower than for clumps with MSX counterpart. Such a difference could be due to the potential prestellar clumps having a lower dust temperature. The mass spectrum of the clumps with masses above M ~100 Msolar is best fitted with a power-law dN/dM proportional to M-alpha with alpha=2.1, consistent with the Salpeter (1955) stellar IMF, with alpha=2.35.
  • The two spectrometers on board the Infrared Space Observatory were used to observe the Herbig-Haro objects HH 80, 81 and 80N, as well as their candidate exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. The fine structure lines of [OI]63um, [OI]145um and [CII]158um are detected everywhere, while [NII]122um and [OIII]88um are only detected toward the HH objects; line ratios confirm for the first time the collisionally excited HH nature of HH 80N. No molecular line is detected in any of the observed positions. We use a full shock code to diagnose shock velocities vs~100 km/s toward the HH objects, as expected from the optical spectroscopy. Since proper motions suggest velocities in excess of 600 km/s, the HH objects probably represent the interface between two flow components with velocity differing by ~vs. Aside from the flow exciting source, the [CII]158um line is everywhere brighter than the [OI]63um line, indicating the presence of a Photo-Dissociation Region (PDR) all along the flow. Continuum emission from the HH objects and from other positions along the flow is only detected longword of ~50 micron, and its proportionality to the [CII]158um line flux suggests it is PDR in origin. We propose that the FUV continuum irradiated by the HH objects and the jet is responsible for the generation of a PDR at the walls of the flow cavity. We develop a very simple model which strengthens the plausibility of this hypothesis.
  • The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope has been used to obtain submillimeter and millimeter continuum photometry of a sample of 30 IRAS sources previously studied in molecular lines and centimeter radio continuum. All the sources have IRAS colours typical of very young stellar objects (YSOs) and are associated with dense gas. In spite of their high luminosities (L>10000 solar units), only ten of these sources are also associated with a radio counterpart. In 17 cases we could identify a clear peak of millimeter emission associated with the IRAS source, while in 9 sources the millimeter emission was extended or faint and a clear peak could not be identified; upper limits were found in 4 cases only. Using simple greybody fitting model to the observed SED, we derive global properties of the circumstellar dust. The dust temperature varies from 24 K to 45 K, while the exponent of the dust emissivity vs frequency power-law spans a range 1.56<beta<2.38, characteristic of silicate dust; total circumstellar masses range up to more than 500 solar masses. We find that for sources with comparable luminosities, the total column densities derived from the dust masses do not distinguish between sources with and without radio counterpart. We interpret this result as an indication that dust does not play a dominant role in inhibiting the formation of the HII region. We examine several scenarios for their origin in terms of newborn ZAMS stars and although most of these fail to explain the observations, we cannot exclude that these sources are young stars already on the ZAMS with modest residual accretion that quenches the expansion of the HII region. Finally, we consider the possibility that the IRAS sources are high-mass pre-ZAMS (or pre-H-burning) objects deriving most of the emitted luminosity from accretion.