• We introduce an efficient dynamical tree method that enables us, for the first time, to explicitly demonstrate thermo-remanent magnetization memory effect in a hierarchical energy landscape. Our simulation nicely reproduces the nontrivial waiting-time and waiting-temperature dependences in this non-equilibrium phenomenon. We further investigate the condensation effect, in which a small set of micro-states dominates the thermodynamic behavior, in the multi-layer trap model. Importantly, a structural phase transition of the tree is shown to coincide with the onset of condensation phenomenon. Our results underscore the importance of hierarchical structure and demonstrate the intimate relation between glassy behavior and structure of barrier trees.
  • The notion of complex energy landscape underpins the intriguing dynamical behaviors in many complex systems ranging from polymers, to brain activity, to social networks and glass transitions. The spin glass state found in dilute magnetic alloys has been an exceptionally convenient laboratory frame for studying complex dynamics resulting from a hierarchical energy landscape with rugged funnels. Here, we show, by a bulk susceptibility and Monte Carlo simulation study, that densely populated frustrated magnets in a spin jam state exhibit much weaker memory effects than spin glasses, and the characteristic properties can be reproduced by a nonhierarchical landscape with a wide and nearly flat but rough bottom. Our results illustrate that the memory effects can be used to probe different slow dynamics of glassy materials, hence opening a window to explore their distinct energy landscapes.
  • Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for the existence of a glassy state, that we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 (SCGO(p)), a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr3+ (s=3/2) ions form a quasi-two-dimensional triangular system of bi-pyramids. Our experimental data shows that as the nonmagnetic Ga3+ impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: a distinct exotic glassy state, which we call a "spin jam", for high magnetic concentration region (p>0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration, (p<0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states in dense frustrated magnets can be understood.
  • The spin reorientation (SR) phenomenon of the square-lattice antiferromagnets RMnAsO (R = Ce, Nd) was investigated by analyzing the spin exchange interactions between the rare-earth and transition-metal ions (R3+ and Mn2+, respectively) on the basis of density functional calculations. It is found that the symmetry and strength of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction are determined primarily by the partially filled 4f states of the R3+ ions, and that the DM and biquadratic (BQ) exchanges between the R3+ and Mn2+ ions are unusually strong and control the observed spin reorientation phenomenon. Below their SR temperature, the Mn2+ and Ce3+ moments are orthogonal in CeMnAsO but are collinear in NdMnAsO, because the DM interaction dominates over the BQ interaction for CeMnAsO while the opposite is the case for NdMnAsO. Experiments designed to test the implications of our findings are proposed.
  • We use inelastic neutron scattering to explore the evolution of the low energy spin dynamics in the electron-doped cuprate Pr0.88LaCe0.12CuO4-d (PLCCO) as the system is tuned from its nonsuperconducting, as-grown antiferromagnetic (AF) state into an optimally-doped superconductor (Tc~24 K) without static AF order. The low temperature, low energy response of the spin excitations in under-doped samples is coupled to the presence of the AF phase, whereas the low-energy magnetic response for samples near optimal Tc exhibits spin fluctuations surprisingly insensitive to the sample temperature. This evolution of the low energy excitations is consistent with the influence of a quantum critical point in the phase diagram of PLCCO associated with the suppression of the static AF order. We carried out scaling analysis of the data and discuss the influence of quantum critical dynamics in the observed excitation spectrum.