• Graphene nanostructures that support surface plasmons have been utilized to create a variety of dynamically tunable light modulators, motivated by theoretical predictions of the potential for unity absorption in resonantly-excited monolayer graphene sheets. Until now, the generally low efficiencies of tunable resonant graphene absorbers have been limited by the mismatch between free-space photons and graphene plasmons. Here, we develop nanophotonic structures that overcome this mismatch and demonstrate electronically tunable perfect absorption achieved with patterned graphenes covering less than 10% of the surface. Experimental measurements reveal 96.9% absorption in the graphene plasmonic nanostructure at 1,389 cm$^{-1}$, with an on/off modulation efficiency of 95.9% in reflection. An analytic effective surface admittance model elucidates the origin of perfect absorption, which is design for critical coupling between free-space modes and the graphene plasmonic nanostructures.
  • Photodetectors are typically based on photocurrent generation from electron-hole pairs in semiconductor structures and on bolometry for wavelengths that are below bandgap absorption. In both cases, resonant plasmonic and nanophotonic structures have been successfully used to enhance performance. In this work, we demonstrate subwavelength thermoelectric nanostructures designed for resonant spectrally selective absorption, which creates large enough localized temperature gradients to generate easily measureable thermoelectric voltages. We show that such structures are tunable and are capable of highly wavelength specific detection, with an input power responsivity of up to 119 V/W (referenced to incident illumination), and response times of nearly 3 kHz, by combining resonant absorption and thermoelectric junctions within a single structure, yielding a bandgap-independent photodetection mechanism. We report results for both resonant nanophotonic bismuth telluride-antimony telluride structures and chromel-alumel structures as examples of a broad class of nanophotonic thermoelectric structures useful for fast, low-cost and robust optoelectronic applications such as non-bandgap-limited hyperspectral and broad-band photodetectors.
  • Enhancing the interaction strength between graphene and light is an important objective for those seeking to make graphene a relevant material for future optoelectronic applications. Plasmonic modes in graphene offer an additional pathway of directing optical energy into the graphene sheet, while at the same time displaying dramatically small optical confinement factors that make them an interesting means of coupling light to atomic or molecular emitters. Here we show that graphene plasmonic nanoresonators can be placed a quarter wavelength from a reflecting surface and electronically tuned to mimic a surface with an impedance closely matched to freespace (Z0 = 377{\Omega}). This geometry - known in early radar applications as a Salisbury screen - allows for an order of magnitude (from 2.3 to 24.5%) increase of the optical absorption in the graphene and provides an efficient means of coupling to the highly confined graphene plasmonic modes.