• Doping bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) with elements such as copper and strontium (Sr) can induce superconductivity, making the doped materials interesting candidates to explore potential topological superconducting behaviors. It was thought that the superconductivity of doped Bi2Se3 was induced by dopant atoms intercalated in van der Waals gaps. However, several experiments have shown that the intercalation of dopant atoms may not necessarily make doped Bi2Se3 superconducting. Thus, the structural origin of superconductivity in doped Bi2Se3 remains an open question. Herein, we combined material synthesis and characterization, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and first-principles calculations to study the doping structure of Sr-doped Bi2Se3. We found that the emergence of superconductivity is strongly related with n-type dopant atoms. Atomic-level energy-dispersive X-ray mapping revealed various n-type Sr dopants that occupy intercalated and interstitial positions. First-principles calculations showed that the formation energy of a specific interstitial Sr doping position depends strongly on Sr doping level. This site changes from a metastable position at low Sr doping level to a stable position at high Sr doping level. The calculation results explain why quenching is necessary to obtain superconducting samples when the Sr doping level is low and also why slow furnace cooling can yield superconducting samples when the Sr doping level is high. Our findings suggest that Sr atoms doped at interstitial locations, instead of those intercalated in van der Waals gaps, are most likely to be responsible for the emergence of superconductivity in Sr-doped Bi2Se3.
  • Using a solid electrolyte to tune the carrier density in thin-film materials is an emerging technique that has potential applications in both basic and applied research. Until now, only materials containing small ions, such as protons and lithium ions, have been used to demonstrate the gating effect. Here, we report the study of a lab-synthesised sodium-ion-based solid electrolyte, which shows a much stronger capability to tune the carrier density in graphene than previously reported lithium-ion-based solid electrolyte. Our findings may stimulate the search for solid electrolytes better suited for gating applications, taking benefit of many existing materials developed for battery research.
  • We have developed a technique to tune the carrier density in graphene using a lithium-ion-based solid electrolyte. We demonstrate that the solid electrolyte can be used as both a substrate to support graphene and a back gate.It can induce a change in the carrier density as large as 1*10^14/cm^2, which is much larger than that induced with oxide-film dielectrics, and it is comparable with that induced by liquid electrolytes. Gate modulation of the carrier density is still visible at 150 K, which is lower than the glass transition temperature of most liquid gating electrolytes.
  • Topological insulators (TIs) are a new quantum state of matter. Their surfaces and interfaces act as a topological boundary to generate massless Dirac fermions with spin-helical textures. Investigation of fermion dynamics near the Dirac point is crucial for the future development of spintronic devices incorporating topological insulators. However, research so far has been unsatisfactory because of a substantial overlap with the bulk valence band and a lack of a completely unoccupied Dirac point (DP). Here, we explore the surface Dirac fermion dynamics in the TI Sb$_2$Te$_3$ by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TrARPES). Sb$_2$Te$_3$ has a DP located completely above the Fermi energy ($E_F$) with an in-gap DP. The excited electrons in the upper Dirac cone stay longer than those below the Dirac point to form an inverted population. This was attributed to a reduced density of states (DOS) near the DP .
  • Electron spin takes critical role in almost all novel phenomena discovered in modern condensed matter physics (High-temperature superconductivity, Kondo effect, Giant Magnetoresistance, topological insulator, quantum anomalous Hall effect, etc.). However, the measurements for electron spin is of poor quality which blocks the development of material sciences because of the low efficiency of spin polarimeter. Here we show an imaging type exchange-scattering spin polarimeter with 5 orders more efficiency compared with a classical Mott polarimeter. As a demonstration, the fine spin structure of electronic states in bismuth (111) is investigated, showing the strong Rashba type spin splitting behavior in both bulk and surface states. This improvement pave the way to study novel spin related phenomena with unprecedented accuracy.
  • A VUV beamline at SSRF for ARPES measurements are designed. To increase the resolution and bulk sensitivity, the photon energy as low as 7 eV is desired. Because the reflectivity for p-polarized photons strongly decreases when the photon energy is below 30 eV, the design of high flux beamline for low energy VUV photons is a challenge. This work shows a variable including angle VLPGM with varied grating depth (VGD) which can achieve both high resolution and high flux with broad energy coverage.
  • All commercial electron spin polarimeters work in single channel mode, which is the bottleneck of researches by spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. By adopting the time inversion antisymmetry of magnetic field, we developed a multichannel spin polarimeter based on normal incident VLEED. The key point to achieve the multi-channel measurements is the spatial resolution of the electron optics. The test of the electron optics shows that the designed spatial resolution can be achieved and an image type spin polarimeter with 100 times 100, totally ten thousand channels is possible to be realized.
  • Bi2Se3 is an important semiconductor thermoelectric material and a prototype topological insulator. Here we report observation of Shubnikov-de Hass (SdH) oscillations accompanied by quantized Hall resistances (Rxy) in highly-doped n-type Bi2Se3 with bulk carrier concentrations of few 10^19 cm^-3. Measurements under tilted magnetic fields show that the magnetotransport is 2D-like, where only the c-axis component of the magnetic field controls the Landau level formation. The quantized step size in 1/Rxy is found to scale with the sample thickness, and average ~e2/h per quintuple layer (QL). We show that the observed magnetotransport features do not come from the sample surface, but arise from the bulk of the sample acting as many parallel 2D electron systems to give a multilayered quantum Hall effect. Besides revealing a new electronic property of Bi2Se3, our finding also has important implications for electronic transport studies of topological insulator materials.
  • The interaction of cobalt atoms with silicon (111) surface has been investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Besides the Co silicide islands, we have successfully distinguished two inequivalent Co-induced $\sqrt{13}\times\sqrt{13}$ reconstructions on Si (111) surface. Our high-resolution STM images provide some structural properties of the two different $\sqrt{13}\times\sqrt{13}$ derived phases. Both of the two phases seem to form islands with single domain. The new findings will help us to understand the early stage of Co silicide formations.