• We present broadband polarimetric observations of a sample of high Faraday rotation measure (RM) AGN using the VLA telescope from 1 to 2 GHz, and 4 to 12 GHz. The sample (14 sources) consists of compact sources (linear resolution smaller than ~ 5 kpc) that are unpolarized at 1.4 GHz in the NVSS. Total intensity data have been modelled using combination of synchrotron components, revealing complex structure in their radio spectra. Depolarization modelling, through the so called qu-fitting, have been performed on the polarized data using an equation that attempts to simplify the process of fitting many different depolarization models that we can divide into two major categories: External Depolarization and Internal Depolarization models. Understanding which of the two mechanisms are the most representative, would help the qualitative understanding of the AGN jet environment, whether it is embedded in a dense external magnetoionic medium or if it is the jet-wind that causes the high RM and strong depolarization. This could help to probe the jet magnetic field geometry (e.g. helical or otherwise). This new high-sensitivity data, shows a complicated behaviour in the total intensity and polarization radio spectrum of individual sources. We observed the presence of several synchrotron components and Faraday components in their total intensity and polarized spectra. For the majority of our targets, (12 sources) the depolarization seems to be caused by a turbulent magnetic field. Thus, our main selection criteria (lack of polarization at 1.4 GHz in the NVSS), results in a sample of sources with very large RMs and depolarization due to turbulent magnetic fields local to the source. We show how the new qu-fitting technique can be used to probe the magnetised radio source environment and to spectrally resolve the polarized components of unresolved radio sources.
  • We present the largest ever sample of radio polarization properties for $z>4$ sources, with 14 sources having significant polarization detections. Using wideband data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we obtained the rest-frame total intensity and polarization properties of 37 radio sources, nine of which have spectroscopic redshifts in the range $1 \le z \le 1.4$, with the other 28 having spectroscopic redshifts in the range $3.5 \le z \le 6.21$. Fits are performed for the Stokes $I$ and fractional polarization spectra, and Faraday rotation measures are derived using Rotation measure synthesis and $QU$ fitting. Using archival data of 476 polarized sources, we compare high redshift ($z>3$) source properties to a $15\,$GHz rest-frame luminosity matched sample of low redshift ($z<3$) sources to investigate if the polarization properties of radio sources at high redshifts are intrinsically different than those at low redshift. We find a mean of the rotation measure absolute values, corrected for Galactic rotation, of $50 \pm 22\,$rad m$^{-2}$ for $z>3$ sources and $57 \pm 4\,$rad m$^{-2}$ for $z<3$. Although there is some indication of lower intrinsic rotation measures at high-$z$ possibly due to higher depolarization from the high density environments, using several statistical tests we detect no significant difference between low and high redshift sources. Larger samples are necessary to determine any true physical difference.
  • We present preliminary results of JVLA wideband full polarization observations of a sample of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) with very high Rotation Measure (RM) values, a sign of extreme environment. Polarization properties show a complex behaviour such that the polarization angle (PA) and fractional polarization (fp) change dramatically within the wide band. The measured RM is not constant within the wide band. Its complex behaviour reflects the complexity of the medium with the presence of several Faraday components. The depolarization has been studied by modelling the variations of the Stokes parameters Q and U together with the polarization parameters (PA and fp) with wavelength using combinations of the simplest existing depolarization models. With this JVLA study we could spectrally resolve multiple polarized components of unresolved AGN. These preliminary results reveal the complexity of these objects, but improvements to the depolarization modelling are needed to better understand the polarization structure of these sources.
  • We present Australia Telescope Compact Array radio data of the dwarf irregular galaxy ESO 324-G024 which is seen in projection against the giant, northern lobe of the radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A, NGC 5128). The distorted morphology and kinematics of ESO 324-G024, as observed in the 21 cm spectral line emission of neutral hydrogen, indicate disruptions by external forces. We investigate whether tidal interactions and/or ram pressure stripping are responsible for the formation of the HI tail stretching to the northeast of ESO 324-G024 with the latter being most probable. Furthermore, we closely analyze the sub-structure of Cen A's polarized radio lobes to ascertain whether ESO 324-G024 is located in front, within or behind the northern lobe. Our multi-wavelength, multi-component approach allows us to determine that ESO 324-G024 is most likely behind the northern radio lobe of Cen A. This result helps to constrain the orientation of the lobe, which is likely inclined to our line of sight by approximately 60 degrees if NGC 5128 and ESO 324-G024 are at the same distance.
  • Faraday rotation of polarised background sources is a unique probe of astrophysical magnetic fields in a diverse range of foreground objects. However, to understand the properties of the polarised sources themselves and of depolarising phenomena along the line of sight, we need to complement Faraday rotation data with polarisation observations over very broad bandwidths. Just as it is impossible to properly image a complex source with limited u-v coverage, we can only meaningfully understand the magneto-ionic properties of polarised sources if we have excellent coverage in $\lambda^2$-space. We here propose a set of broadband polarisation surveys with the Square Kilometre Array, which will provide a singular set of scientific insights on the ways in which galaxies and their environments have evolved over cosmic time.
  • Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are among the most powerful astrophysical objects discovered to date. Indeed, jetted AGN studies have been considered a prominent science case for SKA, and were included in several different chapters of the previous SKA Science Book (Carilli & Rawlings 2004). Most of the fundamental questions about the physics of relativistic jets still remain unanswered, and await high-sensitivity radio instruments such as SKA to solve them. These questions will be addressed specially through analysis of the massive data sets arising from the deep, all-sky surveys (both total and polarimetric flux) from SKA1. Wide-field very-long-baseline-interferometric survey observations involving SKA1 will serve as a unique tool for distinguishing between extragalactic relativistic jets and star forming galaxies via brightness temperature measurements. Subsequent SKA1 studies of relativistic jets at different resolutions will allow for unprecedented cosmological studies of AGN jets up to the epoch of re-ionization, enabling detailed characterization of the jet composition, magnetic field, particle populations, and plasma properties on all scales. SKA will enable us to study the dependence of jet power and star formation on other properties of the AGN system. SKA1 will enable such studies for large samples of jets, while VLBI observations involving SKA1 will provide the sensitivity for pc-scale imaging, and SKA2 (with its extraordinary sensitivity and dynamic range) will allow us for the first time to resolve and model the weakest radio structures in the most powerful radio-loud AGN.
  • A VLA Sky Survey of the extragalactic sky at S band (2-4 GHz) with polarization information can uniquely probe the magneto-ionic medium in a wide range of astrophysical environments over cosmic time. For a shallow all-sky survey, we expect to detect over 4 million sources in total intensity $>$ 0.45 mJy beam$^{-1}$ and over 2.2$\times$10$^5$ sources in polarized intensity. With these new observations, we expect to discover new classes of polarized radio sources in very turbulent astrophysical environments and those with extreme values of Faraday depth. Moreover, by determining reliable Faraday depths and by modeling depolarization effects, we can derive properties of the magneto-ionic medium associated with AGNs, absorption line systems and galaxies, addressing the following unresolved questions: (1) What is the covering fraction, the degree of turbulence and the origin of absorption line systems? (2) What is the thermal content in AGNs and radio galaxies? (3) How do AGNs and galaxies evolve over cosmic time? (4) What causes the increase in percentage polarization with decreasing flux densities at the low flux density end of the polarized source count? (5) What is the growth rate of large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies?
  • A 45 deg2 radio continuum imaging campaign of the nearest radio galaxy, Centaurus A, is reported. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Parkes 64m radio telescope at 1.4 GHz, the spatial resolution of the resultant image is ~600 pc, resolving the ~500 kpc giant radio lobes with approximately five times better physical resolution compared to any previous image, and making this the most detailed radio continuum image of any radio galaxy to date. In this paper, we present these new data and discuss briefly some of the most interesting morphological features that we have discovered in the images... abstract truncated.