• The significant progress in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in last three decades has elevated it from a traditional band mapping tool to a precise probe of many-body interactions and dynamics of quasiparticles in complex quantum systems. The recent developments of deep ultraviolet (DUV, including ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet) laser-based ARPES have further pushed this technique to a new level. In this paper, we review some latest developments in DUV laser-based photoemission systems, including the super-high energy and momentum resolution ARPES, the spin-resolved ARPES, the time-of-flight ARPES, and the time-resolved ARPES. We also highlight some scientific applications in the study of electronic structure in unconventional superconductors and topological materials using these state-of-the-art DUV laser-based ARPES. Finally we provide our perspectives on the future directions in the development of laser-based photoemission systems.
  • In a Dirac nodal line semimetal, the bulk conduction and valence bands touch at extended lines in the Brillouin zone. To date, most of the theoretically predicted and experimentally discovered nodal lines derive from the bulk bands of two- and three-dimensional materials. Here, based on combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements and first-principles calculations, we report the discovery of node-line-like surface states on the (001) surface of LaBi. These bands derive from the topological surface states of LaBi and bridge the band gap opened by spin-orbit coupling and band inversion. Our first-principles calculations reveal that these "nodal lines" have a tiny gap, which is beyond typical experimental resolution. These results may provide important information to understand the extraordinary physical properties of LaBi, such as the extremely large magnetoresistance and resistivity plateau.
  • The iron-based superconductors are characterized by multiple-orbital physics where all the five Fe 3$d$ orbitals get involved. The multiple-orbital nature gives rise to various novel phenomena like orbital-selective Mott transition, nematicity and orbital fluctuation that provide a new route for realizing superconductivity. The complexity of multiple-orbital also asks to disentangle the relationship between orbital, spin and nematicity, and to identify dominant orbital ingredients that dictate superconductivity. The bulk FeSe superconductor provides an ideal platform to address these issues because of its simple crystal structure and unique coexistence of superconductivity and nematicity. However, the orbital nature of the low energy electronic excitations and its relation to the superconducting gap remain controversial. Here we report direct observation of highly anisotropic Fermi surface and extremely anisotropic superconducting gap in the nematic state of FeSe superconductor by high resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements. We find that the low energy excitations of the entire hole pocket at the Brillouin zone center are dominated by the single $d_{xz}$ orbital. The superconducting gap exhibits an anti-correlation relation with the $d_{xz}$ spectral weight near the Fermi level, i.e., the gap size minimum (maximum) corresponds to the maximum (minimum) of the $d_{xz}$ spectral weight along the Fermi surface. These observations provide new insights in understanding the orbital origin of the extremely anisotropic superconducting gap in FeSe superconductor and the relation between nematicity and superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors.
  • WTe2 has attracted a great deal of attention because it exhibits extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance. The underlying origin of such a giant magnetoresistance is still under debate. Utilizing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with high energy and momentum resolutions, we reveal the complete electronic structure of WTe2. This makes it possible to determine accurately the electron and hole concentrations and their temperature dependence. We find that, with increasing the temperature, the overall electron concentration increases while the total hole concentration decreases. It indicates that the electron-hole compensation, if it exists, can only occur in a narrow temperature range, and in most of the temperature range there is an electron-hole imbalance. Our results are not consistent with the perfect electron-hole compensation picture that is commonly considered to be the cause of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2. We identified a flat band near the Brillouin zone center that is close to the Fermi level and exhibits a pronounced temperature dependence. Such a flat band can play an important role in dictating the transport properties of WTe2. Our results provide new insight on understanding the origin of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2.
  • Quantum topological materials, exemplified by topological insulators, three-dimensional Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently because of their unique electronic structure and physical properties. Very lately it is proposed that the three-dimensional Weyl semimetals can be further classified into two types. In the type I Weyl semimetals, a topologically protected linear crossing of two bands, i.e., a Weyl point, occurs at the Fermi level resulting in a point-like Fermi surface. In the type II Weyl semimetals, the Weyl point emerges from a contact of an electron and a hole pocket at the boundary resulting in a highly tilted Weyl cone. In type II Weyl semimetals, the Lorentz invariance is violated and a fundamentally new kind of Weyl Fermions is produced that leads to new physical properties. WTe2 is interesting because it exhibits anomalously large magnetoresistance. It has ignited a new excitement because it is proposed to be the first candidate of realizing type II Weyl Fermions. Here we report our angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) evidence on identifying the type II Weyl Fermion state in WTe2. By utilizing our latest generation laser-based ARPES system with superior energy and momentum resolutions, we have revealed a full picture on the electronic structure of WTe2. Clear surface state has been identified and its connection with the bulk electronic states in the momentum and energy space shows a good agreement with the calculated band structures with the type II Weyl states. Our results provide spectroscopic evidence on the observation of type II Weyl states in WTe2. It has laid a foundation for further exploration of novel phenomena and physical properties in the type II Weyl semimetals.
  • Topological quantum materials, including topological insulators and superconductors, Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently for their unique electronic structure, spin texture and physical properties. Very lately, a new type of Weyl semimetals has been proposed where the Weyl Fermions emerge at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter, which is distinct from the standard type I Weyl semimetals with a point-like Fermi surface. The Weyl cone in this type II semimetals is strongly tilted and the related Fermi surface undergos a Lifshitz transition, giving rise to a new kind of chiral anomaly and other new physics. MoTe2 is proposed to be a candidate of a type II Weyl semimetal; the sensitivity of its topological state to lattice constants and correlation also makes it an ideal platform to explore possible topological phase transitions. By performing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements with unprecedentedly high resolution, we have uncovered electronic evidence of type II semimetal state in MoTe2. We have established a full picture of the bulk electronic states and surface state for MoTe2 that are consistent with the band structure calculations. A single branch of surface state is identified that connects bulk hole pockets and bulk electron pockets. Detailed temperature-dependent ARPES measurements show high intensity spot-like features that is ~40 meV above the Fermi level and is close to the momentum space consistent with the theoretical expectation of the type II Weyl points. Our results constitute electronic evidence on the nature of the Weyl semimetal state that favors the presence of two sets of type II Weyl points in MoTe2.
  • The topological materials have attracted much attention recently. While three-dimensional topological insulators are becoming abundant, two-dimensional topological insulators remain rare, particularly in natural materials. ZrTe5 has host a long-standing puzzle on its anomalous transport properties; its underlying origin remains elusive. Lately, ZrTe5 has ignited renewed interest because it is predicted that single-layer ZrTe5 is a two-dimensional topological insulator and there is possibly a topological phase transition in bulk ZrTe5. However, the topological nature of ZrTe5 is under debate as some experiments point to its being a three-dimensional or quasi-two-dimensional Dirac semimetal. Here we report high-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements on ZrTe5. The electronic property of ZrTe5 is dominated by two branches of nearly-linear-dispersion bands at the Brillouin zone center. These two bands are separated by an energy gap that decreases with decreasing temperature but persists down to the lowest temperature we measured (~2 K). The overall electronic structure exhibits a dramatic temperature dependence; it evolves from a p-type semimetal with a hole-like Fermi pocket at high temperature, to a semiconductor around ~135 K where its resistivity exhibits a peak, to an n-type semimetal with an electron-like Fermi pocket at low temperature. These results indicate a clear electronic evidence of the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in ZrTe5. They provide a natural understanding on the underlying origin of the resistivity anomaly at ~135 K and its associated reversal of the charge carrier type. Our observations also provide key information on deciphering the topological nature of ZrTe5 and possible temperature-induced topological phase transition.
  • High resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on transition metal dichalcogenide PdTe2 that is a superconductor with a Tc at 1.7 K. Combined with theoretical calculations, we have discovered for the first time the existence of topologically nontrivial surface state with Dirac cone in PbTe2 superconductor. It is located at the Brillouin zone center and possesses helical spin texture. Distinct from the usual three-dimensional topological insulators where the Dirac cone of the surface state lies at the Fermi level, the Dirac point of the surface state in PdTe2 lies deep below the Fermi level at ~1.75 eV binding energy and is well separated from the bulk states. The identification of topological surface state in PdTe2 superconductor deep below the Fermi level provides a unique system to explore for new phenomena and properties and opens a door for finding new topological materials in transition metal chalcogenides.
  • The layered transition metal chalcogenides have been a fertile land in solid state physics for many decades. Various MX2-type transition metal dichalcogenides, such as WTe2, IrTe2, and MoS2, have triggered great attention recently, either for the discovery of novel phenomena or some extreme or exotic physical properties, or for their potential applications. PdTe2 is a superconductor in the class of transition metal dichalcogenides, and superconductivity is enhanced in its Cu-intercalated form, Cu0.05PdTe2. It is important to study the electronic structures of PdTe2 and its intercalated form in order to explore for new phenomena and physical properties and understand the related superconductivity enhancement mechanism. Here we report systematic high resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies on PdTe2 and Cu0.05$PdTe2 single crystals, combined with the band structure calculations. We present for the first time in detail the complex multi-band Fermi surface topology and densely-arranged band structure of these compounds. By carefully examining the electronic structures of the two systems, we find that Cu-intercalation in PdTe2 results in electron-doping, which causes the band structure to shift downwards by nearly 16 meV in Cu0.05PdTe2. Our results lay a foundation for further exploration and investigation on PdTe2 and related superconductors.
  • The mechanism of high temperature superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors remains an outstanding issue in condensed matter physics. The electronic structure, in particular the Fermi surface topology, is considered to play an essential role in dictating the superconductivity. Recent revelation of distinct electronic structure and possible high temperature superconductivity with a transition temperature Tc above 65 K in the single-layer FeSe films grown on the SrTiO3 substrate provides key information on the roles of Fermi surface topology and interface in inducing or enhancing superconductivity. Here we report high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurement on the electronic structure and superconducting gap of a novel FeSe-based superconductor, (Li0.84Fe0.16)OHFe0.98Se, with a Tc at 41 K. We find that this single-phase bulk superconductor shows remarkably similar electronic behaviors to that of the superconducting single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film in terms of Fermi surface topology, band structure and nearly isotropic superconducting gap without nodes. These observations provide significant insights in understanding high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film in particular, and the mechanism of superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors in general.
  • The FeSe superconductor and its related systems have attracted much attention in the iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K; it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se by Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A=K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. The latest report of possible high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of the iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review on the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.
  • Silicene, analogous to graphene, is a one-atom-thick two-dimensional crystal of silicon which is expected to share many of the remarkable properties of graphene. The buckled honeycomb structure of silicene, along with its enhanced spin-orbit coupling, endows silicene with considerable advantages over graphene in that the spin-split states in silicene are tunable with external fields. Although the low-energy Dirac cone states lie at the heart of all novel quantum phenomena in a pristine sheet of silicene, the question of whether or not these key states can survive when silicene is grown or supported on a substrate remains hotly debated. Here we report our direct observation of Dirac cones in monolayer silicene grown on a Ag(111) substrate. By performing angle-resolved photoemission measurements on silicene(3x3)/Ag(111), we reveal the presence of six pairs of Dirac cones on the edges of the first Brillouin zone of Ag(111), other than expected six Dirac cones at the K points of the primary silicene(1x1) Brillouin zone. Our result shows clearly that the unusual Dirac cone structure originates not from the pristine silicene alone but from the combined effect of silicene(3x3) and the Ag(111) substrate. This study identifies the first case of a new type of Dirac Fermion generated through the interaction of two different constituents. Our observation of Dirac cones in silicene/Ag(111) opens a new materials platform for investigating unusual quantum phenomena and novel applications based on two-dimensional silicon systems.
  • The layered 5d transition metal oxides like Sr2IrO4 have attracted significant interest recently due to a number of exotic and new phenomena induced by the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling, bandwidth W and on-site Coulomb correlation U. In contrast to a metallic behavior expected from the Mott-Hubbard model due to more spatially extended 5d orbitals and moderate U, an insulating ground state has been observed in Sr2IrO4. Such an insulating behavior can be understood by an effective J_eff=1/2 Mott insulator model by incorporating both electron correlation and strong spin-orbital coupling, although its validity remains under debate at present. In particular, Sr2IrO4 exhibits a number of similarities to the high temperature cuprate superconductors in the crystal structure, electronic structure, magnetic structure, and even possible high temperature superconductivity. Here we report a new observation of the anomalous high energy electronic structure in Sr2IrO4. By taking high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on Sr2IrO4 over a wide energy range, we have revealed that the high energy electronic structures show unusual nearly-vertical bands that extend over a large energy range. Such anomalous high energy behaviors resemble the high energy waterfall features observed in the cuprate superconductors, adding one more important similarity between these two systems. While strong electron correlation plays an important role in producing high energy waterfall features in the cuprate superconductors, the revelation of the high energy anomalies in Sr2IrO4 points to a novel route in generating exotic electronic excitations from the strong spin-orbit coupling and a moderate electron correlation.
  • Topological insulators represent a new quantum state of matter that are insulating in the bulk but metallic on the edge or surface. In the Dirac surface state, it is well-established that the electron spin is locked with the crystal momentum. Here we report a new phenomenon of the spin texture locking with the orbital texture in a topological insulator Bi2Se3. We observe light-polarization-dependent spin texture of both the upper and lower Dirac cones that constitutes strong evidence of the orbital-dependent spin texture in Bi2Se3. The different spin texture detected in variable polarization geometry is the manifestation of the spin-orbital texture in the initial state combined with the photoemission matrix element effects. Our observations provide a new orbital degree of freedom and a new way of light manipulation in controlling the spin structure of the topological insulators that are important for their future applications in spin-related technologies.
  • The parent compound of the copper-oxide high temperature superconductors is a Mott insulator. Superconductivity is realized by doping an appropriate amount of charge carriers. How a Mott insulator transforms into a superconductor is crucial in understanding the unusual physical properties of high temperature superconductors and the superconductivity mechanism. Here we report high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurement on heavily underdoped Bi2Sr2-xLaxCuO6+d system. The electronic structure of the lightly-doped samples exhibit a number of characteristics: existence of an energy gap along the nodal direction, d-wave-like anisotropic energy gap along the underlying Fermi surface, and coexistence of a coherence peak and a broad hump in the photoemission spectra. Our results reveal a clear insulator-superconductor transition at a critical doping level of ~0.10 where the nodal energy gap approaches zero, the three-dimensional antiferromagnetic order disappears, and superconductivity starts to emerge. These observations clearly signal a close connection between the nodal gap, antiferromagnetism and superconductivity.
  • The Dirac materials, such as graphene and three-dimensional topological insulators, have attracted much attention because they exhibit novel quantum phenomena with their low energy electrons governed by the relativistic Dirac equations. One particular interest is to generate Dirac cone anisotropy so that the electrons can propagate differently from one direction to the other, creating an additional tunability for new properties and applications. While various theoretical approaches have been proposed to make the isotropic Dirac cones of graphene into anisotropic ones, it has not yet been met with success. There are also some theoretical predictions and/or experimental indications of anisotropic Dirac cone in novel topological insulators and AMnBi2 (A=Sr and Ca) but more experimental investigations are needed. Here we report systematic high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements that have provided direct evidence on the existence of strongly anisotropic Dirac cones in SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2. Distinct behaviors of the Dirac cones between SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2 are also observed. These results have provided important information on the strong anisotropy of the Dirac cones in AMnBi2 system that can be governed by the spin-orbital coupling and the local environment surrounding the Bi square net.
  • High resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on Sb(111) single crystal. Two kinds of Fermi surface sheets are observed that are derived from the topological surface states: one small hexagonal electron-like Fermi pocket around $\Gamma$ point and the other six elongated lobes of hole-like Fermi pockets around the electron pocket. Clear Rashba-type band splitting due to the strong spin-orbit coupling is observed that is anisotropic in the momentum space. Our super-high-resolution ARPES measurements reveal no obvious kink in the surface band dispersions indicating a weak electron-phonon interaction in the surface states. In particular, the electron scattering rate for these topological surface states is nearly a constant over a large energy window near the Fermi level that is unusual in terms of the conventional picture.
  • The three-dimensional topological semimetals represent a new quantum state of matter. Distinct from the surface state in the topological insulators that exhibits linear dispersion in two-dimensional momentum plane, the three-dimensional semimetals host bulk band dispersions linearly along all directions, forming discrete Dirac cones in three-dimensional momentum space. In addition to the gapless points (Weyl/Dirac nodes) in the bulk, the three-dimensional Weyl/Dirac semimetals are also characterized by "topologically protected" surface state with Fermi arcs on their specific surface. The Weyl/Dirac semimetals have attracted much attention recently they provide a venue not only to explore unique quantum phenomena but also to show potential applications. While Cd3As2 is proposed to be a viable candidate of a Dirac semimetal, more experimental evidence and theoretical investigation are necessary to pin down its nature. In particular, the topological surface state, the hallmark of the three-dimensional semimetal, has not been observed in Cd3As2. Here we report the electronic structure of Cd3As2 investigated by angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the (112) crystal surface and detailed band structure calculations. The measured Fermi surface and band structure show a good agreement with the band structure calculations with two bulk Dirac-like bands approaching the Fermi level and forming Dirac points near the Brillouin zone center. Moreover, the topological surface state with a linear dispersion approaching the Fermi level is identified for the first time. These results provide strong experimental evidence on the nature of topologically non-trivial three-dimensional Dirac cones in Cd3As2.
  • The latest discovery of possible high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe film grown on a SrTiO3 substrate, together with the observation of its unique electronic structure and nodeless superconducting gap, has generated much attention. Initial work also found that, while the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film exhibits a clear signature of superconductivity, the double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film shows an insulating behavior. Such a dramatic difference between the single-layer and double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films is surprising and the underlying origin remains unclear. Here we report our comparative study between the single-layer and double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films by performing a systematic angle-resolved photoemission study on the samples annealed in vacuum. We find that, like the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film, the as-prepared double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film is insulating and possibly magnetic, thus establishing a universal existence of the magnetic phase in the FeSe/SrTiO3 films. In particular, the double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film shows a quite different doping behavior from the single-layer film in that it is hard to get doped and remains in the insulating state under an extensive annealing condition. The difference originates from the much reduced doping efficiency in the bottom FeSe layer of the double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film from the FeSe-SrTiO3 interface. These observations provide key insights in understanding the origin of superconductivity and the doping mechanism in the FeSe/SrTiO3 films. The property disparity between the single-layer and double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films may facilitate to fabricate electronic devices by making superconducting and insulating components on the same substrate under the same condition.
  • In high temperature cuprate superconductors, it is now generally agreed that the parent compound is a Mott insulator and superconductivity is realized by doping the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator. In the iron-based superconductors, however, the parent compound is mostly antiferromagnetic metal, raising a debate on whether an appropriate starting point should go with an itinerant picture or a localized picture. It has been proposed theoretically that the parent compound of the iron-based superconductors may be on the verge of a Mott insulator, but so far no clear experimental evidence of doping-induced Mott transition has been available. Here we report an electronic evidence of an insulator-superconductor transition observed in the single-layer FeSe films grown on the SrTiO3 substrate. By taking angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the electronic structure and energy gap, we have identified a clear evolution of an insulator to a superconductor with the increasing doping. This observation represents the first example of an insulator-superconductor transition via doping observed in the iron-based superconductors. It indicates that the parent compound of the iron-based superconductors is in proximity of a Mott insulator and strong electron correlation should be considered in describing the iron-based superconductors.
  • The (Ca,R)FeAs2 (R=La,Pr and etc.) superconductors with a signature of superconductivity transition above 40 K possess a new kind of block layers that consist of zig-zag As chains. In this paper, we report the electronic structure of the new (Ca,La)FeAs2 superconductor investigated by both band structure calculations and high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements. Band structure calculations indicate that there are four hole-like bands around the zone center $\Gamma$(0,0) and two electron-like bands near the zone corner M(pi,pi) in CaFeAs2. In our angle-resolved photoemission measurements on (Ca0.9La0.1})FeAs2, we have observed three hole-like bands around the Gamma point and one electron-like Fermi surface near the M(pi,pi) point. These results provide important information to compare and contrast with the electronic structure of other iron-based compounds in understanding the superconductivity mechanism in the iron-based superconductors.
  • High resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on Bi2Sr2CuO6+d superconductor covering a wide doping range from heavily underdoped to heavily overdoped samples. Two obvious energy scales are identified in the nodal dispersions: one is the well-known 50-80 meV high energy kink and the other is <10 meV low energy kink. The high energy kink increases monotonously in its energy scale with increasing doping and shows weak temperature dependence, while the low energy kink exhibits a non-monotonic doping dependence with its coupling strength enhanced sharply below Tc. These systematic investigations on the doping and temperature dependence of these two energy scales favor electron-phonon interactions as their origin. They point to the importance in involving the electron-phonon coupling in understanding the physical properties and the superconductivity mechanism of high temperature cuprate superconductors.
  • Three-dimensional topological insulators are characterized by insulating bulk state and metallic surface state involving Dirac fermions that behave as massless relativistic particles. These Dirac fermions are responsible for achieving a number of novel and exotic quantum phenomena in the topological insulators and for their potential applications in spintronics and quantum computations. It is thus essential to understand the electron dynamics of the Dirac fermions, i.e., how they interact with other electrons, phonons and disorders. Here we report super-high resolution angle-resolved photoemission studies on the Dirac fermion dynamics in the prototypical Bi2(Te,Se)3 topological insulators. We have directly revealed signatures of the electron-phonon coupling in these topological insulators and found that the electron-disorder interaction is the dominant factor in the scattering process. The Dirac fermion dynamics in Bi2(Te3-xSex) topological insulators can be tuned by varying the composition, x, or by controlling the charge carriers. Our findings provide crucial information in understanding the electron dynamics of the Dirac fermions in topological insulators and in engineering their surface state for fundamental studies and potential applications.
  • Super-high resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d (Bi2212) superconductors to investigate momentum dependence of electron coupling with collective excitations (modes). Two coexisting energy scales are clearly revealed over a large momentum space for the first time in the superconducting state of an overdoped Bi2212 superconductor. These two energy scales exhibit distinct momentum dependence: one keeps its energy near 78 meV over a large momentum space while the other changes its energy from $\sim$40 meV near the antinodal region to $\sim$70 meV near the nodal region. These observations provide a new picture on momentum evolution of electron-boson coupling in Bi2212 that electrons are coupled with two sharp modes simultaneously over a large momentum space in the superconducting states. Their unusual momentum dependence poses a challenge to our current understanding of electron-mode-coupling and its role for high temperature superconductivity in cuprate superconductors.
  • Superconductivity in the cuprate superconductors and the Fe-based superconductors is realized by doping the parent compound with charge carriers, or by application of high pressure, to suppress the antiferromagnetic state. Such a rich phase diagram is important in understanding superconductivity mechanism and other physics in the Cu- and Fe-based high temperature superconductors. In this paper, we report a phase diagram in the single-layer FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrate by an annealing procedure to tune the charge carrier concentration over a wide range. A dramatic change of the band structure and Fermi surface is observed, with two distinct phases identified that are competing during the annealing process. Superconductivity with a record high transition temperature (Tc) at ~65 K is realized by optimizing the annealing process. The wide tunability of the system across different phases, and its high-Tc, make the single-layer FeSe film ideal not only to investigate the superconductivity physics and mechanism, but also to study novel quantum phenomena and for potential applications.