• We derive and compare the fractions of cool-core clusters in the {\em Planck} Early Sunyaev-Zel'dovich sample of 164 clusters with $z \leq 0.35$ and in a flux-limited X-ray sample of 100 clusters with $z \leq 0.30$, using {\em Chandra} observations. We use four metrics to identify cool-core clusters: 1) the concentration parameter: the ratio of the integrated emissivity profile within 0.15 $r_{500}$ to that within $r_{500}$, and 2) the ratio of the integrated emissivity profile within 40 kpc to that within 400 kpc, 3) the cuspiness of the gas density profile: the negative of the logarithmic derivative of the gas density with respect to the radius, measured at 0.04 $r_{500}$, and 4) the central gas density, measured at 0.01 $r_{500}$. We find that the sample of X-ray selected clusters, as characterized by each of these metrics, contains a significantly larger fraction of cool-core clusters compared to the sample of SZ selected clusters (44$\pm$7\% vs. 28$\pm$4\% using the concentration parameter in the 0.15--1.0 $r_{500}$ range, 61$\pm$8\% vs. 36$\pm$5\% using the concentration parameter in the 40--400 kpc range, 64$\pm$8\% vs. 38$\pm$5\% using the cuspiness, and 53$\pm$7\% vs. 39$\pm$5\% using the central gas density). Qualitatively, cool-core clusters are more X-ray luminous at fixed mass. Hence, our X-ray flux-limited sample, compared to the approximately mass-limited SZ sample, is over-represented with cool-core clusters. We describe a simple quantitative model that uses the excess luminosity of cool-core clusters compared to non-cool-core clusters at fixed mass to successfully predict the observed fraction of cool-core clusters in X-ray selected samples.
  • We present a search for the synchrotron emission from the synchrotron cosmic web by cross correlating 180MHz radio images from the Murchison Widefield Array with tracers of large scale structure (LSS). We use two versions of the radio image covering $21.76\times 21.76$ degrees with point sources brighter than 0.05 Jy subtracted, with and without filtering of Galactic emission. As tracers of the LSS we use the Two-Micron-All-Sky-Survey (2MASS) and the Widefield InfraRed Explorer (WISE) redshift catalogues to produce galaxy number density maps. The cross correlation functions all show peak amplitudes at zero degrees, decreasing with varying slopes towards zero correlation over a range of one degree. The cross correlation signals include components from point source, Galactic, and extragalactic diffuse emission. We use models of the diffuse emission from smoothing the density maps with Gaussians of sizes 1-4 Mpc to find limits on the cosmic web components. From these models we find surface brightness 99.7 per cent upper limits in the range of 0.09-2.20 mJy beam$^{-1}$ (average beam size of 2.6 arcmin), corresponding to 0.01-0.30 mJy arcmin$^{-2}$. Assuming equipartition between energy densities of cosmic rays and the magnetic field, the flux density limits translate to magnetic field strength limits of 0.03-1.98 $\mu$G, depending heavily on the spectral index. We conclude that for a 3$\sigma$ detection of 0.1 $\mu$G magnetic field strengths via cross correlations, image depths of sub-mJy to sub-$\mu$Jy are necessary. We include discussion on the treatment and effect of extragalactic point sources and Galactic emission, and next steps for building on this work.
  • With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2.3+/-0.1 x 10^25 W Hz^-1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94% of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster -- a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re-)acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming from a local remnant of a radio galaxy, which we are lucky to catch before its complete disruption. If this scenario, in which a relic forms when a shock crosses a well-defined region of the ICM polluted with aged relativistic plasma -- as opposed to the usual assumption that seeds are uniformly mixed in the ICM -- is also the case for other relics, this may explain a number of peculiar properties of peripheral relics.
  • We report Faraday rotation measurements of 11 extragalactic radio sources with lines of sight through the Rosette Nebula, a prominent HII region associated with the star cluster NGC 2244. It is also a prototypical example of a "stellar bubble" produced by the winds of the stars in NGC 2244. The goal of these measurements is to better determine the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the nebula. We calculate the rotation measure (RM) through two methods, a least-squares fit to $\chi$( $\lambda^2$) and Rotation Measure Synthesis. In conjunction with our results from Savage et al. (2013), we find an excess RM due to the shell of the nebula of +40 to +1200 rad m$^{-2}$ above a background RM of +147 rad m$^{-2}$. We discuss two forms of a simple shell model intended to reproduce the magnitude of the observed RM as a function of distance from the center of the Rosette Nebula. The models represent different physical situations for the magnetic field within the shell of the nebula. The first assumes that there is an increase in the magnetic field strength and plasma density at the outer radius of the HII region, such as would be produced by a strong magnetohydrodynamic shock wave. The second model assumes that any increase in the RM is due solely to an increase in the density, and the Galactic magnetic field is unaffected in the shell. We employ a Bayesian analysis to distinguish between the two forms of the model.
  • The presence of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters has been well established in recent years, and their importance for the understanding of the physical processes at work in the Intra Cluster Medium has been recognized. Halo and relic sources have been detected in several tens clusters. A strong correlation is present between the halo and relic radio power and the X-ray luminosity. Since cluster X-Ray luminosity and mass are related, the correlation between the radio power and X-ray luminosity could derive from a physical dependence of the radio power on the cluster mass, therefore the cluster mass could be a crucial parameter in the formation of these sources. The goal of this project is to investigate the existence of non-thermal structures beyond the Mpc scale, and associated with lower density regions with respect to clusters of galaxies: galaxy filaments connecting rich clusters. We present a piece of evidence of diffuse radio emission in intergalactic filaments. Moreover, we present and discuss the detection of radio emission in galaxy groups and in faint X-Ray clusters, to analyze non-thermal properties in low density regions with physical conditions similar to galaxy filaments. We discuss how SKA1 observations will allow the investigation of this topic and the study of the presence of diffuse radio sources in low density regions. This will be a fundamental step to understand the origin and properties of cosmological magnetic fields.
  • The detection of the diffuse gas component of the cosmic web remains a formidable challenge. In this work we study synchrotron emission from the cosmic web with simulated SKA1 observations, which can represent an fundamental probe of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. We investigate radio emission originated by relativistic electrons accelerated by shocks surrounding cosmic filaments, assuming diffusive shock acceleration and as a function of the (unknown) large-scale magnetic fields. The detection of the brightest parts of large ($>10 \rm Mpc$) filaments of the cosmic web should be within reach of the SKA1-LOW, if the magnetic field is at the level of a $\sim 10$ percent equipartition with the thermal gas, corresponding to $\sim 0.1 \mu G$ for the most massive filaments in simulations. In the course of a 2-years survey with SKA1-LOW, this will enable a first detection of the "tip of the iceberg" of the radio cosmic web, and allow for the use of the SKA as a powerful tool to study the origin of cosmic magnetism in large-scale structures. On the other hand, the SKA1-MID and SKA1-SUR seem less suited for this science case at low redshift ($z \leq 0.4$), owing to the missing short baselines and the consequent lack of signal from the large-scale brightness fluctuations associated with the filaments. In this case only very long exposures ($\sim 1000$ hr) may enable the detection of $\sim 1-2$ filament for field of view in the SKA1-SUR PAF Band1.
  • We present deep 1.1-3.1 GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of the radio halo of the bullet cluster, 1E 0657-55.8. In comparison to existing images of this radio halo the detection in our images is at higher significance. The radio halo is as extended as the X-ray emission in the direction of cluster merger but is significantly less extended than the X-ray emission in the perpendicular direction. At low significance we detect a faint second peak in the radio halo close to the X-ray centroid of the smaller sub-cluster (the bullet) suggesting that, similarly to the X-ray emission, the radio halo may consist of two components. Finally, we find that the distinctive shape of the western edge of the radio halo traces out the X-ray detected bow shock. The radio halo morphology and the lack of strong point-to-point correlations between radio, X-ray and weak-lensing properties suggests that the radio halo is still being formed. The colocation of the X-ray shock with a distinctive radio brightness edge illustrates that the shock is influencing the structure of the radio halo. These observations support the theory that shocks and turbulence influence the formation and evolution of radio halo synchrotron emission.
  • We present results on 12 X-ray bright clusters observed at 1.4 GHz with the Green Bank Telescope. After subtraction of point sources, we reach a median (best) 1-sigma noise level of 0.01 (0.006) microJy/sq. arcsec, and find a significant excess of diffuse, low surface brightness emission in 11 of 12 clusters. We present initial 1.4 GHz Very Large Array results on Abell 2319. We find: (a) four new detections tentatively classified as two halos (A2065, A2069) and two relics (A2067, A2073); (b) the first detection of the radio halo in A2061 at 1.4 GHz, making it a possible ultra-steep spectrum halo (alpha ~ 1.8); (c) a ~2 Mpc radio halo in the sloshing, minor-merger cluster A2142; (d) a >2x increase of the giant radio halo extent and luminosity in A2319; (e) a ~7x increase to the integrated radio flux and >4x increase to the observed extent of the peripheral, polarized radio relic in A1367 to ~600 kpc; (f) significant excess emission of ambiguous nature in three clusters. Our radio halo detections agree with the well-known X-ray/radio luminosity correlation, but are larger and fainter than expected. The volume averaged synchrotron emissivities are 1-2 orders of magnitude below the previous characteristic values. Some of the halo-like detections may represent previously unseen, very low surface brightness emission or blends of shock structures and sub-Mpc scale turbulent regions. Four of the five tentative halos contain one or more X-ray cold fronts, suggesting a possible connection between gas sloshing and particle acceleration on large scales. We see evidence for a possible inter-cluster filament between A2061 and A2067. For our faintest detections, we note the possibility of residual contamination from faint radio galaxies. We also quantify the sensitivity of the NVSS to extended emission as a function of angular size.[abridged]
  • Significant new opportunities for astrophysics and cosmology have been identified at low radio frequencies. The Murchison Widefield Array is the first telescope in the Southern Hemisphere designed specifically to explore the low-frequency astronomical sky between 80 and 300 MHz with arcminute angular resolution and high survey efficiency. The telescope will enable new advances along four key science themes, including searching for redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionisation in the early Universe; Galactic and extragalactic all-sky southern hemisphere surveys; time-domain astrophysics; and solar, heliospheric, and ionospheric science and space weather. The Murchison Widefield Array is located in Western Australia at the site of the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA) low-band telescope and is the only low-frequency SKA precursor facility. In this paper, we review the performance properties of the Murchison Widefield Array and describe its primary scientific objectives.
  • The Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders ASKAP and MeerKAT will produce prodigious amounts of data that necessitate automated source finding. The performance of automated source finders can be improved by pre-processing a dataset. In preparation for the WALLABY and DINGO surveys, we have used a test HI datacube constructed from actual Westerbork Telescope noise and WHISP HI galaxies to test the real world improvement of linear smoothing, the {\sc Duchamp} source finder's wavelet de-noising, iterative median smoothing and mathematical morphology subtraction, on intensity threshold source finding of spectral line datasets. To compare these pre-processing methods we have generated completeness-reliability performance curves for each method and a range of input parameters. We find that iterative median smoothing produces the best source finding results for ASKAP HI spectral line observations, but wavelet de-noising is a safer pre-processing technique. In this paper we also present our implementations of iterative median smoothing and mathematical morphology subtraction.
  • We derive the best characterization to date of the properties of radio quiescent massive galaxy clusters through a statistical analysis of their average synchrotron emissivity. We stacked 105 radio images of clusters from the 843 MHz SUMSS survey, all with X-ray luminosities greater than 1.0E+44 erg/s and redshifts z < 0.2, after removing point-source contamination and rescaling to a common physical size. Each stacked cluster individually shows no significant large-scale diffuse radio emission at current sensitivity levels. Stacking of sub-samples leads to the following results: (i) clusters with L_{X} > 3.0E+44 erg/s show a 6-sigma detection of Mpc-scale diffuse emission with a 1.4 GHz luminosity of 2.4\pm0.4 x 1.0E+23 W/Hz. This is 1.5-2 times lower than the upper limits for radio quiescent clusters from the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (Venturi et al. 2008), and is the first independent confirmation of radio halo bi-modality; (ii) clusters with low X-ray concentrations have a mean radio luminosity (2.6\pm0.6 x 1.0E+23 W/Hz) that is at least twice that of high X-ray concentration clusters, and (iii) both of these detections are likely close to the low-level "off-state" of GRHs in most or all luminous X-ray clusters, and not due to contributions from a much smaller subset of "on-state" GRHs following the radio/X-ray luminosity correlation. Upcoming deep radio surveys will conclusively distinguish between these two options. We briefly discuss possible origins for the "off-state" emission and its implications for magnetic fields in most or all luminous X-ray clusters.
  • Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis is an important tool to study and analyze galactic and extra-galactic magnetic fields. Since there is a Fourier relation between the Faraday dispersion function and the polarized radio emission, full reconstruction of the dispersion function requires knowledge of the polarized radio emission at both positive and negative square wavelengths $\lambda^2$. However, one can only make observations for $\lambda^2 > 0$. Furthermore observations are possible only for a limited range of wavelengths. Thus reconstructing the Faraday dispersion function from these limited measurements is ill-conditioned. In this paper, we propose three new reconstruction algorithms for RM synthesis based upon compressive sensing/sampling (CS). These algorithms are designed to be appropriate for Faraday thin sources only, thick sources only, and mixed sources respectively. Both visual and numerical results show that the new RM synthesis methods provide superior reconstructions of both magnitude and phase information than RM-CLEAN
  • Shocks and turbulence generated during large-scale structure formation are predicted to produce large-scale, low surface-brightness synchrotron emission. On the largest scales, this emission is globally correlated with the thermal baryon distribution, and constitutes the "Synchrotron Cosmic- Web". I present the observational prospects and challenges for detecting this faint emission with upcoming SKA pathfinders.
  • We present an analysis of the polarization of compact radio sources from six pointings of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz with 35% coverage in lambda^2. After correcting for the off-axis instrumental polarization with a simple analytical model, only a small number of 585 strong sources have significant polarizations at these wavelengths. The median depolarization ratio from 1.4 GHz for the strongest sources is <0.2, reinforcing the likelihood that radio galaxies are found in magnetized environments, even outside of rich clusters. Seven sources with significant 350 MHz polarization were selected for a more in-depth Faraday structure analysis. We fit the observed values Q/I and U/I as a function of lambda^2 using both a depolarizing screen and two component models. We also performed RM Synthesis/Clean and standard fitting of polarization angle vs. lambda^2. We find that a single rotation measure (RM), as found using polarization angle fitting or simple screen models, commonly provides a poor fit when the solutions are translated back into Q, U space. Thus, although a single "characteristic" rotation measure may be found using these techniques, the Faraday structure of the source may not be adequately represented. We also demonstrate that RM Synthesis may yield an erroneous Faraday structure in the presence of multiple, interfering RM components, even when cleaning of the Faraday spectrum is performed. We briefly explore the conditions under which rotation measures and Faraday structure results can be reliable. Many measurements in the literature do not meet these criteria; we discuss how these influence the resulting scientific conclusions and offer a prescription for obtaining reliable RMs.
  • With magnetic fields below one microgauss, the minimum pressures of synchrotron plasmas start to approach those in the thermal gas in cluster outskirts and the more diffuse WHIM in large-scale structure filaments. We summarize some of our techniques to find the corresponding low surface brightness radio sources and what we have uncovered. We identify cluster-like sources in poor environments, likely requiring very efficient relativistic particle acceleration, as well as very diffuse radio galaxies with no indications of current activity. More detailed observations of Coma and a new radio-identified cluster highlight some emerging issues in cluster-related shocks: Coma has a shock on the border of its halo, suggesting a connection between the two; the Coma relic appears to be an "infall" shock, associated with a 500 km/s infalling column of galaxies; the new cluster has filamentary pieces in addition to its more classical halo and peripheral relics, suggesting that we are beginning to see relic emission face on. Finally, a different kind of shock comes from our recent finding of ambiguities in the determination of rotation measures which will influence cluster magnetic field studies.
  • We present a new radio-selected cluster of galaxies, 0217+70, using observations from the Very Large Array and archival optical and X-ray data. The new cluster is one of only seven known that has candidate double peripheral radio relics, and the second of those with a giant radio halo (GRH), as well. It also contains unusual diffuse radio filaments interior to the peripheral relics, and a clumpy, elongated X-ray structure. All of these indicate a very actively evolving system, with ongoing accretion and merger activity, illuminating a network of shocks, such as those first seen in numerical simulations. The peripheral relics are most easily understood as outgoing spherical merger shocks with large variations in brightness along them, likely reflecting the inhomogeneities in the shocks' magnetic fields . The interior filaments could be projections of substructures from the sheet-like peripheral shocks, or they might be separate structures due to multiple accretion events. ROSAT images show large-scale diffuse X-ray emission coincident with the GRH, and additional patchy diffuse emission that suggests a recent merger event. This uniquely rich set of radio shocks and halo offer the possibility, with deeper X-ray, optical and data higher resolution radio observations, of testing the models of how shocks and turbulence couple to the relativistic plasma. 0217+70 is also over-luminous in the radio compared to the empirical radio-X-ray correlation for clusters -- the third example of such a system. This new population of diffuse radio emission opens up the possibility of probing low-mass cluster mergers with upcoming deep radio continuum surveys.
  • We report on new 1.41 GHz Green Bank Telescope and 352 MHz Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations of the Coma cluster and its environs. At 1.41 GHz we tentatively detect an extension to the Coma cluster radio relic source 1253+275 which makes its total extent ~2 Mpc. This extended relic is linearly polarized as seen in our GBT data, the NVSS, and archival images, strengthening a shock interpretation. The extended relic borders a previously undetected "wall" of galaxies in the infall region of the Coma cluster. We suggest that the radio relic is an infall shock, as opposed to the outgoing merger shocks believed responsible for other radio relics. We also find a sharp edge, or "front", on the western side of the 352 MHz radio halo. This front is coincident with a similar discontinuity in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature in its southern half, suggesting a primary shock-acceleration origin for the local synchrotron emitting electrons. The northern half of the synchrotron front is less well correlated with the X-ray properties, perhaps due to projection effects. We confirm the global pixel-to-pixel power-law correlation between the 352 MHz radio brightness and X-ray brightness with a slope that is inconsistent with predictions of either primary shock acceleration or secondary production of relativistic electrons in Giant Radio Halos, but is allowable in the framework of the turbulent re-acceleration of relic plasma. The failure of these first order models and the need for a more comprehensive view of the intracluster medium energization is also highlighted by the very different shapes of the diffuse radio and X-ray emission. We note the puzzling correspondence between the shape of the brighter regions of the radio halo and the surface mass density derived from weak lensing.
  • We explore for the first time the method of cross-correlation of radio synchrotron emission and tracers of large-scale structure in order to detect the diffuse IGM/WHIM. We performed a cross-correlation of a 34 x 34 degree area of 2MASS galaxies for two redshift slices (0.03 < z < 0.04 and 0.06 < z < 0.07) with the corresponding region of the 1.4 GHz Bonn survey. For this analysis, we assumed that the synchrotron surface brightness is linearly proportional to surface density of galaxies. We also sampled the cross-correlation function using 24 distant fields of the same size from the Bonn survey, to better assess the noise properties. Though we obtained a null result, we found that by adding a signal weighted by the 2MASS image with a filament (peak) surface brightness of 1 (7) mK and 7 (49) mK would produce a 3 sigma positive correlation for the 0.03 < z < 0.04 and 0.06 < z < 0.07 redshift slices respectively. These detection thresholds correspond to minimum energy magnetic fields as low as 0.2 microG, close to some theoretical expectations for filament field values. This injected signal is also below the rms noise of the Bonn survey, and demonstrates the power of this technique and its utility for upcoming sensitive continuum surveys such as GALFACTS at Arecibo and those planned with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA).
  • We present our attempts to detect magnetic fields in filamentary large-scale structure (LSS) by observing polarized synchrotron emission emitted by structure formation shocks. Little is known about the strength and order of magnetic fields beyond the largest clusters of galaxies, and synchrotron emission holds enormous promise as a means of probing magnetic fields in these low density regions. We report on observations taken at the Green Bank Telescope which reveal a possible Mpc extension to the Coma cluster relic. We also highlight the major obstacle that diffuse galactic foreground emission poses for any search for large-scale, low surface-brightness extragalactic emission. Finally we explore cross-correlation of diffuse radio emission with optical tracers of LSS as a means to statistically detecting magnetic fields in the presence of this confounding foreground emission.
  • We present a study of the spectral, polarimetric, morphological and environmental properties of the diffuse radio source 0809+39 using observations taken with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, the Very Large Array, and archival optical and X-ray data. The source has two distinct diffuse, steep-spectrum components, one in the north that is highly polarized, and a linear southern component undetected in polarization. We discuss several plausible origins for each component, and conclude that the northern bright polarized component is most likely a radio relic associated with a poor z$\sim$0.2 cluster of galaxies, with a radio/X-ray luminosity ratio two orders of magnitude above typical values. The southern component is aligned with a more extended filament of galaxies $\sim$5 Mpc long at z$\sim$0.04. Deep optical and X-ray follow-ups are still needed in order to confirm and understand the physical origins of the synchrotron emission. Whatever the details of these origins, 0809+39 highlights the utility of synchrotron radiation for illuminating the diffuse components of low density environments unrelated to rich clusters.
  • We have developed a method for recovering polarization structures from the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey (NVSS) on larger angular scales than the nominal 15 arc minute survey limit. The technique depends on the existence of smaller scale fluctuations in polarization angle, to which the interferometer is sensitive, while the undetected total intensity of the structures can be arbitrarily large. We recover the large scale structure of the polarized Milky Way, as seen in single dish surveys, as well as a wide variety of smaller scale galactic and extragalactic features. We present a brief discussion of the uncertainties and limitations of the reprocessed NVSS polarization survey, a comparison of single-dish and NVSS results, and a sampling of the new polarization structures. We show a companion feature 1.8 Mpc outside of Abell cluster 3744, apparent Mpc-scale extensions to the tailed radio galaxy 3C31, a possible new giant galactic loop,and a new bright polarized patch in supernova remnant CTA1. We note that there is little quantitative information from these detections, and followup investigations would be necessary to measure reliable polarized fluxes and position angles. Some of the new features discovered in this NVSS reanalysis could provide a foreground for CMB polarization studies, but the internal foreground modeling for the next generation of experiments should have no difficulty accounting for them.
  • We detect a dip of 20-45% in the surface brightness and number counts of NVSS sources smoothed to a few degrees at the location of the WMAP cold spot. The dip has structure on scales of approximately 1-10 degrees. Together with independent all-sky wavelet analyses, our results suggest that the dip in extragalactic brightness and number counts and the WMAP cold spot are physically related, i.e., that the coincidence is neither a statistical anomaly nor a WMAP foreground correction problem. If the cold spot does originate from structures at modest redshifts, as we suggest, then there is no remaining need for non-Gaussian processes at the last scattering surface of the CMB to explain the cold spot. The late integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, already seen statistically for NVSS source counts, can now be seen to operate on a single region. To create the magnitude and angular size of the WMAP cold spot requires a ~140 Mpc radius completely empty void at z<=1 along this line of sight. This is far outside the current expectations of the concordance cosmology, and adds to the anomalies seen in the CMB.