• Conventionally, the parallelism between the physical properties of Ce and Yb based magnets and heavy fermions has been considered to arise as a consequence of the electron-hole symmetry known for the band theory in condensed matter physics. Namely, the trivalent state of Ce has $4f^{1}$ configuration, while $4f^{13}$ configuration for Yb$^{3+}$ can be viewed as a state carrying one 4$f$ hole. However, in the light of this parallelism, the magnetism of Yb based intermetallic compounds has been a mystery over decades; the transition temperature of the Yb based compounds is normally very small, as low as $\sim$ 1 K or even lower, while Ce counterparts may often have the transition temperature well exceeding 10 K. Here, we report our experimental discovery of the transition temperature reaching 20 K for the first time in an Yb based compound. Our single crystal study using transport, thermomagnetic and photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveals that the Mn substitution at the Al site in an intermediate valence state of $\alpha$-YbAlB$_{4}$ not only induces antiferromagnetic transition at a record high temperature of 20 K but also transform the heavy fermion liquid state in $\alpha$-YbAlB$_{4}$ into a highly resistive metallic state proximate to a Kondo insulator. The high temperature antiferromagnetism in a system close to a Kondo insulator is unusual and suggest a novel type of itinerant magnetism in the Yb based heavy fermion systems.
  • Topological superconductors, whose edge hosts Majorana bound states or Majorana fermions that obey non-Abelian statistics, can be used for low-decoherence quantum computations. Most of the proposed topological superconductors are realized with spin-helical states through proximity effect to BCS superconductors. However, such approaches are difficult for further studies and applications because of the low transition temperatures and complicated hetero-structures. Here by using high-resolution spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we discover that the iron-based superconductor FeTe1-xSex (x = 0.45, Tc = 14.5 K) hosts Dirac-cone type spin-helical surface states at Fermi level, which open an s-wave SC gap below Tc. Our study proves that the surface states of FeTe0.55Se0.45 are 2D topologically superconducting, and thus provides a simple and possibly high-Tc platform for realizing Majorana fermions.
  • We investigate the transient electronic structure of BaFe2As2, a parent compound of iron-based superconductors, by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In order to probe the entire Brillouin zone, we utilize extreme ultraviolet photons and observe photoemission intensity oscillation with the frequency of the A1g phonon which is antiphase between the zone-centered hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) and zone-cornered electron FSs. We attribute the antiphase behavior to the warping in one of the zone-centered hole FSs accompanying the displacement of the pnictogen height, and find that this displacement is the same direction as that induced by substitution of P for As, where superconductivity is induced by a structural modification without carrier doping in this system.
  • Topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs) exhibit bulk Dirac cones protected by time reversal and crystal symmetry, as well as surface states originating from non-trivial topology. While there is a manifold possible onset of superconducting order in such systems, few observations of intrinsic superconductivity have so far been reported for TDSs. We observe evidence for a TDS phase in FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_x$ ($x$ = 0.45), one of the high transition temperature ($T_c$) iron-based superconductors. In angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) and transport experiments, we find spin-polarized states overlapping with the bulk states on the (001) surface, and linear magnetoresistance (MR) starting from 6 T. Combined, this strongly suggests the existence of a TDS phase, which is confirmed by theoretical calculations. In total, the topological electronic states in Fe(Te,Se) provide a promising high $T_c$ platform to realize multiple topological superconducting phases.
  • Topological insulators/semimetals and unconventional iron-based superconductors have attracted major attentions in condensed matter physics in the past 10 years. However, there is little overlap between these two fields, although the combination of topological states and superconducting states will produce more exotic topologically superconducting states and Majorana bound states (MBS), a promising candidate for realizing topological quantum computations. With the progress in laser-based spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with very high energy- and momentum-resolution, we directly resolved the topological insulator (TI) phase and topological Dirac semimetal (TDS) phase near Fermi level ($E_F$) in the iron-based superconductor Li(Fe,Co)As. The TI and TDS phases can be separately tuned to $E_F$ by Co doping, allowing a detailed study of different superconducting topological states in the same material. Together with the topological states in Fe(Te,Se), our study shows the ubiquitous coexistence of superconductivity and multiple topological phases in iron-based superconductors, and opens a new age for the study of high-Tc iron-based superconductors and topological superconductivity.
  • Experiments of time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (Tr-XMCD) and resonant x-ray scattering at a beamline BL07LSU in SPring-8 with a time-resolution of under 50 ps are presented. A micro-channel plate is utilized for the Tr-XMCD measurements at nearly normal incidence both in the partial electron and total fluorescence yield (PEY and TFY) modes at the L2,3 absorption edges of the 3d transition-metals in the soft x-ray region. The ultrafast photo-induced demagnetization within 50 ps is observed on the dynamics of a magnetic material of FePt thin film, having a distinct threshold of the photon density. The spectrum in the PEY mode is less-distorted both at the L2,3 edges compared with that in the TFY mode and has the potential to apply the sum rule analysis for XMCD spectra in pump-probed experiments.
  • We investigate the superconducting-gap anisotropy in one of the recently discovered BiS$_2$-based superconductors, NdO$_{0.71}$F$_{0.29}$BiS$_2$ ($T_c$ $\sim$ 5 K), using laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Whereas the previously discovered high-$T_c$ superconductors such as copper oxides and iron-based superconductors, which are believed to have unconventional superconducting mechanisms, have $3d$ electrons in their conduction bands, the conduction band of BiS$_2$-based superconductors mainly consists of Bi 6$p$ electrons, and hence the conventional superconducting mechanism might be expected. Contrary to this expectation, we observe a strongly anisotropic superconducting gap. This result strongly suggests that the pairing mechanism for NdO$_{0.71}$F$_{0.29}$BiS$_2$ is unconventional one and we attribute the observed anisotropy to competitive or cooperative multiple paring interactions.
  • Topological phases of matter exhibit phase transitions between distinct topological classes. These phase transitions are exotic in that they do not fall within the traditional Ginzburg-Landau paradigm but are instead associated with changes in bulk topological invariants and associated topological surface states. In the case of a Weyl semimetal this phase transition is particularly unusual because it involves the creation of bulk chiral charges and the nucleation of topological Fermi arcs. Here we image a topological phase transition to a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ with changing composition $x$. Using pump-probe ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES), we directly observe the nucleation of a topological Fermi arc at $x_c \sim 7\%$, showing the critical point of a topological Weyl phase transition. For Mo dopings $x < x_c$, we observe no Fermi arc, while for $x > x_c$, the Fermi arc gradually extends as the bulk Weyl points separate. Our results demonstrate for the first time the creation of magnetic monopoles in momentum space. Our work opens the way to manipulating chiral charge and topological Fermi arcs in Weyl semimetals for transport experiments and device applications.
  • The recent discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs offers the first Weyl fermion observed in nature and dramatically broadens the classification of topological phases. However, in TaAs it has proven challenging to study the rich transport phenomena arising from emergent Weyl fermions. The series Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are inversion-breaking, layered, tunable semimetals already under study as a promising platform for new electronics and recently proposed to host Type II, or strongly Lorentz-violating, Weyl fermions. Here we report the discovery of a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ at $x = 25\%$. We use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe a topological Fermi arc above the Fermi level, demonstrating a Weyl semimetal. The excellent agreement with calculation suggests that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is the first Type II Weyl semimetal. We also find that certain Weyl points are at the Fermi level, making Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ a promising platform for transport and optics experiments on Weyl semimetals.
  • We determine the band structure and spin texture of WTe2 by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES). With the support of first-principles calculations, we reveal the existence of spin polarization of both the Fermi arc surface states and bulk Fermi pockets. Our results support WTe2 to be a type-II Weyl semimetal candidate and provide important information to understand its extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance.
  • The recent explosion of research interest in Weyl semimetals has led to many proposed Weyl semimetal candidates and a few experimental observations of a Weyl semimetal in real materials. Through this experience, we have come to appreciate that typical Weyl semimetals host many Weyl points. For instance, the first Weyl semimetal observed in experiment, TaAs, hosts 24 Weyl points. Similarly, the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series, recently under study as the first Type II Weyl semimetal, has eight Weyl points. However, it is well-understood that for a Weyl semimetal without inversion symmetry but with time-reversal symmetry, the minimum number of Weyl points is four. Realizing such a minimal Weyl semimetal is fundamentally relevant because it would offer the simplest "hydrogen atom" example of an inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. At the same time, transport experiments and device applications may be simpler in a system with as few Weyl points as possible. Recently, TaIrTe$_4$ has been predicted to be a minimal, inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. However, crucially, the Weyl points and Fermi arcs live entirely above the Fermi level, making them inaccessible to conventional angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Here we use pump-probe ARPES to directly access the band structure above the Fermi level in TaIrTe$_4$. We directly observe Weyl points and topological Fermi arcs, showing that TaIrTe$_4$ is a Weyl semimetal. We find that, in total, TaIrTe$_4$ has four Weyl points, providing the first example of a minimal inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. Our results hold promise for accessing exotic transport phenomena arising in Weyl semimetals in a real material.
  • It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ may realize such a Type II Weyl fermion. One crucial challenge is that the Weyl points in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are predicted to lie above the Fermi level. Here, by studying a simple model for a Type II Weyl cone, we clarify the importance of accessing the unoccupied band structure to demonstrate that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is a Weyl semimetal. Then, we use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe the unoccupied band structure of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. For the first time, we directly access states $> 0.2$ eV above the Fermi level. By comparing our results with $\textit{ab initio}$ calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. Our work opens the way to studying the unoccupied band structure as well as the time-domain relaxation dynamics of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ and related transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser ($h\nu$= 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7$^\circ$ angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.
  • We present a review on the developments in the photoemission spectrometer with a vacuum ultraviolet laser at Institute for Solid State Physics at the University of Tokyo. The advantages of high energy resolution, high cooling ability, and bulk sensitivity enable applications with a wide range of materials. We introduce some examples of fine electronic structures detected by laser photoemission spectroscopy and discuss the prospects of research on low-transition-temperature superconductors exhibiting unconventional superconductivity.
  • Weyl semimetals have sparked intense research interest, but experimental work has been limited to the TaAs family of compounds. Recently, a number of theoretical works have predicted that compounds in the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series are Weyl semimetals. Such proposals are particularly exciting because Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ has a quasi two-dimensional crystal structure well-suited to many transport experiments, while WTe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ have already been the subject of numerous proposals for device applications. However, with available ARPES techniques it is challenging to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. According to the predictions, the Weyl points are above the Fermi level, the system approaches two critical points as a function of doping, there are many irrelevant bulk bands, the Fermi arcs are nearly degenerate with bulk bands and the bulk band gap is small. Here, we study Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for $x = 0.07$ and 0.45 using pump-probe ARPES. The system exhibits a dramatic response to the pump laser and we successfully access states $> 0.2$eV above the Fermi level. For the first time, we observe direct, experimental signatures of Fermi arcs in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$, which agree well with theoretical calculations of the surface states. However, we caution that the interpretation of these features depends sensitively on free parameters in the surface state calculation. We comment on the prospect of conclusively demonstrating a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$.
  • A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that host Weyl fermions as quasiparticle excitations. The Weyl fermions at zero energy correspond to points of bulk band degeneracy, Weyl nodes, which are separated in momentum space and are connected only through the crystal's boundary by an exotic Fermi arc surface state. We experimentally measure the spin polarization of the Fermi arcs in the first experimentally discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. Our spin data, for the first time, reveal that the Fermi arcs' spin polarization magnitude is as large as 80% and possesses a spin texture that is completely in-plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the chirality of the Weyl nodes in TaAs cannot be inferred by the spin texture of the Fermi arcs. The observed non-degenerate property of the Fermi arcs is important for the establishment of its exact topological nature, which reveal that spins on the arc form a novel type of 2D matter. Additionally, the nearly full spin polarization we observed (~80%) may be useful in spintronic applications.
  • Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc ~ 3 K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc ~ 2.5 K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excited topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. Our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials.
  • The interaction between light and novel two-dimensional electronic states holds promise to realize new fundamental physics and optical devices. Here, we use pump-probe photoemission spectroscopy to study the optically-excited Dirac surface states in the bulk-insulating topological insulator Bi2Te2Se, and reveal optical properties that are in sharp contrast to those of bulk-metallic topological insulators. We observe a gigantic optical life-time exceeding 4 micro-sec for the surface states in Bi2Te2Se, whereas the life-time in most topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 has been limited to a few picoseconds. Moreover, we discover a surface photo-voltage in topological materials, a shift of the chemical potential of the Dirac surface states, as large as 100 mV. Our results demonstrate a rare platform to study charge excitation and relaxation in energy and momentum space in a two dimensional quantum system.
  • Topological insulators (TIs) are a new quantum state of matter. Their surfaces and interfaces act as a topological boundary to generate massless Dirac fermions with spin-helical textures. Investigation of fermion dynamics near the Dirac point is crucial for the future development of spintronic devices incorporating topological insulators. However, research so far has been unsatisfactory because of a substantial overlap with the bulk valence band and a lack of a completely unoccupied Dirac point (DP). Here, we explore the surface Dirac fermion dynamics in the TI Sb$_2$Te$_3$ by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TrARPES). Sb$_2$Te$_3$ has a DP located completely above the Fermi energy ($E_F$) with an in-gap DP. The excited electrons in the upper Dirac cone stay longer than those below the Dirac point to form an inverted population. This was attributed to a reduced density of states (DOS) near the DP .
  • Conventional superconductivity follows Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer(BCS) theory of electrons-pairing in momentum-space, while superfluidity is the Bose-Einstein condensation(BEC) of atoms paired in real-space. These properties of solid metals and ultra-cold gases, respectively, are connected by the BCS-BEC crossover. Here we investigate the band dispersions in FeTe$_{0.6}$Se$_{0.4}$($T_c$ = 14.5 K $\sim$ 1.2 meV) in an accessible range below and above the Fermi level($E_F$) using ultra-high resolution laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We uncover an electron band lying just 0.7 meV ($\sim$ 8 K) above $E_F$ at the $\Gamma$-point, which shows a sharp superconducting coherence peak with gap formation below $T_c$. The estimated superconducting gap $\Delta$ and Fermi energy $\epsilon_F$ indicate composite superconductivity in an iron-based superconductor, consisting of strong-coupling BEC in the electron band and weak-coupling BCS-like superconductivity in the hole band. The study identifies the possible route to BCS-BEC superconductivity.
  • The Kondo insulator SmB6 has long been known to exhibit low temperature transport anomalies whose origin is of great interest. Here we uniquely access the surface electronic structure of the anomalous transport regime by combining state-of-the-art laser- and synchrotron-based angle-resolved photoemission techniques. We observe clear in-gap states (up to 4 meV), whose temperature dependence is contingent upon the Kondo gap formation. In addition, our observed in-gap Fermi surface oddness tied with the Kramers' points topology, their coexistence with the two-dimensional transport anomaly in the Kondo hybridization regime, as well as their robustness against thermal recycling, taken together, collectively provide by-far the strongest evidence for protected surface metallicity with a Fermi surface whose topology is consistent with the theoretically predicted topological surface Fermi surface (TSS). Our observations of systematic surface electronic structure provide the fundamental electronic parameters for the anomalous Kondo ground state of the correlated electron material SmB6.
  • Electron scattering in the topological surface state (TSS) of the bulk-insulating topological insulator Bi$_{1.5}$Sb$_{0.5}$Te$_{1.7}$Se$_{1.3}$ was studied using quasiparticle interference observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. It was found that not only the 180$^{\circ}$ backscattering but also a wide range of backscattering angles of 100$^{\circ}$--180$^{\circ}$ is effectively prohibited in the TSS. This conclusion was obtained by comparing the observed scattering vectors with the diameters of the constant-energy contours of the TSS, which were measured for both occupied and unoccupied states using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The unexpectedly robust protection from backscattering in the TSS is a good news for applications, but it poses a challenge to the theoretical understanding of the transport in the TSS.
  • We report on laser-excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in the electron-doped cuprate Sm(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-d). The data show the existence of a nodal hole-pocket Fermi-surface both in the normal and superconducting states. We prove that its origin is long-range antiferromagnetism by an analysis of the coherence factors in the main and folded bands. This coexistence of long-range antiferromagnetism and superconductivity implies that electron-doped cuprates are two-Fermi-surface superconductors. The measured superconducting gap in the nodal hole-pocket is compatible with a d-wave symmetry.
  • CuFeO_2 is one of the multiferroic materials and is the first case that the electric polarization is not explained by the magnetostriction model or the spin-current model. We have studied this material using soft x-ray resonant diffraction and found that superlattice reflection 0, 1 - 2q, 0 appears in the ferroelectric and incommensurate magnetic ordered phase at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges and moreover that the rotation of the x-ray polarization such as from {\sigma} to {\pi} or from {\pi} to {\sigma} is allowed at this reflection. These findings definitely provide direct evidence that the 3d orbital state of Fe ions has a long range order in the ferroelectric state and support the spin-dependent d-p hybridization mechanism.
  • We have performed soft x-ray and ultrahigh-resolution laser-excited photoemission measurements on tetragonal FeSe, which was recently identified as a superconductor. Energy dependent study of valence band is compared to band structure calculations and yields a reasonable assignment of partial densities of states. However, the sharp peak near the Fermi level slightly deviates from the calculated energy position, giving rise to the necessity of self-energy correction. We have also performed ultrahigh-resolution laser photoemission experiment on FeSe and observed the suppression of intensity around the Fermi level upon cooling.