• Periodically-driven topological phases have attracted considerable attentions in condensed matters, but experimental demonstration of such driven quantum systems with anomalous topological phases remains a great challenge. Here, a photonic Floquet simulator (PFS) was designed and systematically investigated to study engineered topological phases in a periodically-driven Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. The PFS was composed of an ultra-thin coupled microwave waveguide array with periodically-bending profiles, and was thoroughly tested the quantum transition from the adiabatic limit (slow-driving) to the high-frequency limit (fast-driving). Surprisingly, between the two opposite limits, a robust periodically-driven end state, propagating along the boundary but periodically emerging into/from the bulk of the array, was experimentally observed for the first time. Theoretically, we demonstrated that this driven end state is the topological protected anomalous {\pi}-mode, and appears only at certain driving frequencies and Floquet gauges (i.e., input positions). Our experimental realization of 'topological Floquet engineering' will prompt great interest in periodically-driven topological phases in the fields of photonics, condensed matters and ultra-cold atoms.
  • Starting from well-known absolute instruments for perfect imaging, we introduce a type of rotational-symmetrical compact closed manifolds, namely geodesic lenses. We demonstrate that light rays confined on geodesic lenses are closed trajectories. While for optical waves, the spectrum of geodesic lens is (at least approximately) degenerate and equidistant with numerical methods. Based on this property, we show a periodical evolution of optical waves and quantum waves on geodesic lenses. Moreover, we fabricate two geodesic lenses in sub-micrometer scale, where curved light rays are observed with high accurate precision. Our results may offer a new platform to investigate light propagation on curved surfaces.
  • In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate reversible wavefront shaping through mimicking gravitational field. A gradient-index micro-structured optical waveguide with special refractive index profile was constructed whose effective index satisfying a gravitational field profile. Inside the waveguide, an incident broad Gaussian beam is firstly transformed into an accelerating beam, and the generated accelerating beam is gradually changed back to a Gaussian beam afterwards. To validate our experiment, we performed full-wave continuum simulations that agree with the experimental results. Furthermore, a theoretical model was established to describe the evolution of the laser beam based on Landau's method, showing that the accelerating beam behaves like the Airy beam in the small range in which the linear potential approaches zero. To our knowledge, such a reversible wavefront shaping technique has not been reported before.
  • Weyl fermions have not been found in nature as elementary particles, but they emerge as nodal points in the band structure of electronic and classical wave crystals. Novel phenomena such as Fermi arcs and chiral anomaly have fueled the interest in these topological points which are frequently perceived as monopoles in momentum space. Here we report the experimental observation of generalized optical Weyl points inside the parameter space of a photonic crystal with a specially designed four-layer unit cell. The reflection at the surface of a truncated photonic crystal exhibits phase vortexes due to the synthetic Weyl points, which in turn guarantees the existence of interface states between photonic crystals and any reflecting substrates. The reflection phase vortexes have been confirmed for the first time in our experiments which serve as an experimental signature of the generalized Weyl points. The existence of these interface states is protected by the topological properties of the Weyl points and the trajectories of these states in the parameter space resembles those of Weyl semimetal "Fermi arcs surface states" in momentum space. Tracing the origin of interface states to the topological character of the parameter space paves the way for a rational design of strongly localized states with enhanced local field.
  • Transformation optics (TO) has been used to propose various novel optical devices. With the help of metamaterials, several intriguing designs, such as invisibility cloaks, have been implemented. However, as the basic units should be much smaller than the working wavelengths to achieve the effective material parameters, and the sizes of devices should be much larger than the wavelengths of illumination to work within the light-ray approximation, it is a big challenge to implement an experimental system that works simultaneously for both geometric optics and wave optics. In this letter, by using a gradient-index micro-structured optical waveguide, we realize a device of conformal transformation optics (CTO) and demonstrate its self-focusing property for geometry optics and Talbot effect for wave optics. In addition, the Talbot effect in such a system has a potential application to transfer digital information without diffraction. Our findings demonstrate the photon controlling ability of CTO in a feasible experiment system.
  • Weyl fermions1 do not appear in nature as elementary particles, but they are now found to exist as nodal points in the band structure of electronic and classical wave crystals. Novel phenomena such as Fermi arcs and chiral anomaly have fueled the interest of these topological points which are frequently perceived as monopoles in momentum space. Here, we demonstrate that generalized Weyl points can exist in a parameter space and we report the first observation of such nodal points in one-dimensional photonic crystals in the optical range. The reflection phase inside the band gap of a truncated photonic crystal exhibits vortexes in the parameter space where the Weyl points are defined and they share the same topological charges as the Weyl points. These vortexes guarantee the existence of interface states, the trajectory of which can be understood as "Fermi arcs" emerging from the Weyl nodes.
  • Pulsed lasers operating in the 2-5 {\mu}m band are important for a wide range of applications in sensing, spectroscopy, imaging and communications. Despite recent advances with mid-infrared gain media, the lack of a capable pulse generation mechanism, i.e. a passive optical switch, remains a significant technological challenge. Here we show that mid-infrared optical response of Dirac states in crystalline Cd3As2, a three-dimensional topological Dirac semimetal (TDS), constitutes an ideal ultrafast optical switching mechanism for the 2-5 {\mu}m range. Significantly, fundamental aspects of the photocarrier processes, such as relaxation time scales, are found to be flexibly controlled through element doping, a feature crucial for the development of convenient mid-infrared ultrafast sources. Although various exotic physical phenomena have been uncovered in three-dimensional TDS systems, our findings show for the first time that this emerging class of quantum materials can be harnessed to fill a long known gap in the field of photonics.
  • Zak phase labels the topological property of one-dimensional Bloch Bands. Here we propose a scheme and experimentally measure the Zak phase in a photonic system. The Zak phase of a bulk band of is related to the topological properties of the two band gaps sandwiching this band, which in turn can be inferred from the existence or absence of an interface state. Using reflection spectrum measurement, we determined the existence of interface states in the gaps, and then obtained the Zak phases. The knowledge of Zak phases can also help us predict the existence of interface states between a metasurface and a photonic crystal. By manipulating the property of the metasurface, we can further tune the excitation frequency and the polarization of the interface state.
  • We demonstrate a gain-switched thulium fiber laser that can be continuously tuned over 140 nm, while maintaining stable nanosecond single-pulse operation. To the best of our knowledge, this system represents the broadest tuning range for a gain-switched fiber laser. The system simplicity and wideband wavelength tunability combined with the ability to control the temporal characteristics of the gain-switched pulses mean this is a versatile source highly suited to a wide range of applications in the eye-safe region of the infrared, including spectroscopy, sensing and material processing, as well as being a practical seed source for pumping nonlinear processes.
  • In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying the quantum characteristics in plasmonic metamaterials. By using the Hamiltonian combined with second quantization, we have investigated the basic excitation of the coupled metamaterials and presented a quantum description of them. The interaction between the excitation of the coupled metamaterial and the exciton in the quantum dot material has been further considered with the aid of the interaction Hamiltonian. In such a damping system, a set of Langevin equations has been used to deal with the quantum motion of the system. And the stimulated emission has been found, which can be used to form a nano-laser. The quantum description of coupled metamaterial and the interaction system could work as the fundamental method in paving the way for studies on quantum effects in coupled metamaterials.
  • (00l)-Oriented LiNbO3 ultra-thin film was fabricated on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrate using pulsed laser deposition. The film shrunk into crystalline state nanoparticles that still kept (00l) preferential orientation as being annealed in the oxygen atmosphere at 500 oC for 2 hours. These LiNbO3 nanoparticles exhibited the ferroelectricity, showing asymmetrical hysteresis loop which might originate from the large internal field at the interface. These nanoparticles could be used for further studying on the size effects and the ferroelectricity of nanocrystal.