• After numerous astronomical and experimental searches, the precise particle nature of dark matter is still unknown. The standard Weakly Interacting Massive Particle(WIMP) dark matter, despite successfully explaining the large-scale features of the universe, has long-standing small-scale issues. The spectral distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background(CMB) caused by Silk damping in the pre-recombination era allows one to access information on a range of small scales $0.3 \, {\rm Mpc} < k < 10^4 \, \rm Mpc^{-1}$, whose dynamics can be precisely described using linear theory. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using the Silk damping induced CMB spectral distortion as a probe of the small-scale power. We consider four suggested alternative dark matter candidates---Warm Dark Matter (WDM), Late Forming Dark Matter, Ultra Light Axion dark matter and Charged Decaying Dark Matter; the matter power in all these models deviate significantly from the $\Lambda$CDM model at small scales. We compute the spectral distortion of CMB for these alternative models and compare our results with the $\Lambda$CDM model. We show that the main impact of alternative models is to alter the sub-horizon evolution of the Newtonian potential which affects the late-time behaviour of spectral distortion of CMB. The $y$-parameter diminishes by a few percent as compared to the $\Lambda$CDM model for a range of parameters of these models: LFDM for formation redshift $z_f = 10^5$ (7\%); WDM for mass $m_{\rm wdm} = 1 \, \rm keV$ (2\%); CHDM for decay redshift $z_{\rm decay} = 10^5$ (5\%); ULA for mass $m_a = 10^{-24} \, \rm eV$ (3\%). We also briefly discuss the detectability of this deviation in light of the upcoming CMB experiment PIXIE, which might have the sensitivity to detect this signal from the pre-recombination phase.
  • The Detection of redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is a challenging task owing to strong foregrounds that dominate the signal. In this paper, we propose a general method, based on the delay spectrum approach, to extract HI power spectra that is applicable to tracking observations using an imaging radio interferometer (Delay Spectrum with Imaging Arrays (DSIA)). Our method is based on modelling the HI signal taking into account the impact of wide field effects such as the $w$-term which are then used as appropriate weights in cross-correlating the measured visibilities. Our method is applicable to any radio interferometer that tracks a phase center and could be utilized for arrays such as MWA, LOFAR, GMRT, PAPER and HERA. In the literature the delay spectrum approach has been implemented for near-redundant baselines using drift scan observations. In this paper we explore the scheme for non-redundant tracking arrays, and this is the first application of delay spectrum methodology to such data to extract the HI signal. We analyze 3 hours of MWA tracking data on the EoR1 field. We present both 2-dimensional ($k_\parallel,k_\perp$) and 1-dimensional (k) power spectra from the analysis. Our results are in agreement with the findings of other pipelines developed to analyse the MWA EoR data.
  • The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) has collected hundreds of hours of Epoch of Reionization (EoR) data and now faces the challenge of overcoming foreground and systematic contamination to reduce the data to a cosmological measurement. We introduce several novel analysis techniques such as cable reflection calibration, hyper-resolution gridding kernels, diffuse foreground model subtraction, and quality control methods. Each change to the analysis pipeline is tested against a two dimensional power spectrum figure of merit to demonstrate improvement. We incorporate the new techniques into a deep integration of 32 hours of MWA data. This data set is used to place a systematic-limited upper limit on the cosmological power spectrum of $\Delta^2 \leq 2.7 \times 10^4$ mK$^2$ at $k=0.27$ h~Mpc$^{-1}$ and $z=7.1$, consistent with other published limits, and a modest improvement (factor of 1.4) over previous MWA results. From this deep analysis we have identified a list of improvements to be made to our EoR data analysis strategies. These improvements will be implemented in the future and detailed in upcoming publications.
  • We present the 21 cm power spectrum analysis approach of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization project. In this paper, we compare the outputs of multiple pipelines for the purpose of validating statistical limits cosmological hydrogen at redshifts between 6 and 12. Multiple, independent, data calibration and reduction pipelines are used to make power spectrum limits on a fiducial night of data. Comparing the outputs of imaging and power spectrum stages highlights differences in calibration, foreground subtraction and power spectrum calculation. The power spectra found using these different methods span a space defined by the various tradeoffs between speed, accuracy, and systematic control. Lessons learned from comparing the pipelines range from the algorithmic to the prosaically mundane; all demonstrate the many pitfalls of neglecting reproducibility. We briefly discuss the way these different methods attempt to handle the question of evaluating a significant detection in the presence of foregrounds.
  • We present first results from radio observations with the Murchison Widefield Array seeking to constrain the power spectrum of 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations between the redshifts of 11.6 and 17.9 (113 and 75 MHz). Three hours of observations were conducted over two nights with significantly different levels of ionospheric activity. We use these data to assess the impact of systematic errors at low frequency, including the ionosphere and radio-frequency interference, on a power spectrum measurement. We find that after the 1-3 hours of integration presented here, our measurements at the Murchison Radio Observatory are not limited by RFI, even within the FM band, and that the ionosphere does not appear to affect the level of power in the modes that we expect to be sensitive to cosmology. Power spectrum detections, inconsistent with noise, due to fine spectral structure imprinted on the foregrounds by reflections in the signal-chain, occupy the spatial Fourier modes where we would otherwise be most sensitive to the cosmological signal. We are able to reduce this contamination using calibration solutions derived from autocorrelations so that we achieve an sensitivity of $10^4$ mK on comoving scales $k\lesssim 0.5 h$Mpc$^{-1}$. This represents the first upper limits on the $21$ cm power spectrum fluctuations at redshifts $12\lesssim z \lesssim 18$ but is still limited by calibration systematics. While calibration improvements may allow us to further remove this contamination, our results emphasize that future experiments should consider carefully the existence of and their ability to calibrate out any spectral structure within the EoR window.
  • In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that removing a foreground model which includes sources in both the main field-of-view and the first sidelobes reduces the contamination in high k_parallel modes by several percent relative to a model which only includes sources in the main field-of-view, with the completeness of the foreground model setting the principal limitation on the amount of power removed. While small, a percent-level amount of foreground power is in itself more than enough to prevent recovery of any EoR signal from these modes. This result demonstrates that foreground subtraction for redshifted 21 cm experiments is truly a wide-field problem, and algorithms and simulations must extend beyond the main instrument field-of-view to potentially recover the full 21 cm power spectrum.
  • Detection of the cosmological neutral hydrogen signal from the Epoch of Reionization, and estimation of its basic physical parameters, is the principal scientific aim of many current low-frequency radio telescopes. Here we describe the Cosmological HI Power Spectrum Estimator (CHIPS), an algorithm developed and implemented with data from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), to compute the two-dimensional and spherically-averaged power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations. The principal motivations for CHIPS are the application of realistic instrumental and foreground models to form the optimal estimator, thereby maximising the likelihood of unbiased signal estimation, and allowing a full covariant understanding of the outputs. CHIPS employs an inverse-covariance weighting of the data through the maximum likelihood estimator, thereby allowing use of the full parameter space for signal estimation ("foreground suppression"). We describe the motivation for the algorithm, implementation, application to real and simulated data, and early outputs. Upon application to a set of 3 hours of data, we set a 2$\sigma$ upper limit on the EoR dimensionless power at $k=0.05$~h.Mpc$^{-1}$ of $\Delta_k^2<7.6\times{10^4}$~mK$^2$ in the redshift range $z=[6.2-6.6]$, consistent with previous estimates.
  • We confirm our recent prediction of the "pitchfork" foreground signature in power spectra of high-redshift 21 cm measurements where the interferometer is sensitive to large-scale structure on all baselines. This is due to the inherent response of a wide-field instrument and is characterized by enhanced power from foreground emission in Fourier modes adjacent to those considered to be the most sensitive to the cosmological H I signal. In our recent paper, many signatures from the simulation that predicted this feature were validated against Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) data, but this key pitchfork signature was close to the noise level. In this paper, we improve the data sensitivity through the coherent averaging of 12 independent snapshots with identical instrument settings and provide the first confirmation of the prediction with a signal-to-noise ratio > 10. This wide-field effect can be mitigated by careful antenna designs that suppress sensitivity near the horizon. Simple models for antenna apertures that have been proposed for future instruments such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and the Square Kilometre Array indicate they should suppress foreground leakage from the pitchfork by ~40 dB relative to the MWA and significantly increase the likelihood of cosmological signal detection in these critical Fourier modes in the three-dimensional power spectrum.
  • We study the impact of the extra density fluctuations induced by primordial magnetic fields on the reionization history in the redshift range: $6 < z < 10$. We perform a comprehensive MCMC physical analysis allowing the variation of parameters related to primordial magnetic fields (strength, $B_0$, and power-spectrum index $n_{\scriptscriptstyle \rm B}$), reionization, and $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. We find that magnetic field strengths in the range: $B_0 \simeq 0.05{-}0.3$ nG (for nearly scale-free power spectra) can significantly alter the reionization history in the above redshift range and can relieve the tension between the WMAP and quasar absorption spectra data. Our analysis puts upper-limits on the magnetic field strength $B_0 < 0.358, 0.120, 0.059$ nG (95 % c.l.) for $n_{\scriptscriptstyle \rm B} = -2.95, -2.9, -2.85$, respectively. These represent the strongest magnetic field constraints among those available from other cosmological observables.
  • Detection of 21~cm emission of HI from the epoch of reionization, at redshifts z>6, is limited primarily by foreground emission. We investigate the signatures of wide-field measurements and an all-sky foreground model using the delay spectrum technique that maps the measurements to foreground object locations through signal delays between antenna pairs. We demonstrate interferometric measurements are inherently sensitive to all scales, including the largest angular scales, owing to the nature of wide-field measurements. These wide-field effects are generic to all observations but antenna shapes impact their amplitudes substantially. A dish-shaped antenna yields the most desirable features from a foreground contamination viewpoint, relative to a dipole or a phased array. Comparing data from recent Murchison Widefield Array observations, we demonstrate that the foreground signatures that have the largest impact on the HI signal arise from power received far away from the primary field of view. We identify diffuse emission near the horizon as a significant contributing factor, even on wide antenna spacings that usually represent structures on small scales. For signals entering through the primary field of view, compact emission dominates the foreground contamination. These two mechanisms imprint a characteristic "pitchfork" signature on the "foreground wedge" in Fourier delay space. Based on these results, we propose that selective down-weighting of data based on antenna spacing and time can mitigate foreground contamination substantially by a factor ~100 with negligible loss of sensitivity.
  • We put constraints on the epoch of dark matter formation for a class of non-WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) dark matter candidates. These models allow a fraction of Cold Dark Matter (CDM) to be formed between the epoch of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the matter radiation equality. We show that for such models the matter power spectra might get strong suppression even on scales that could be probed by linear perturbation theory at low redshifts. Unlike the case of Warm Dark Matter (WDM), where the mass of the dark matter particle controls the suppression scale, in Late Forming Dark Matter (LFDM) scenario, it is the redshift of the dark matter formation which determines the form of the matter power spectra. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy clustering data and the linear matter power spectrum reconstructed from the Lyman-$\alpha$ data to find the latest epoch of the dark matter formation in our universe. If all the observed dark matter is late forming, we find lower bounds on the redshift of dark matter formation $z_f > 1.08 \times 10^5 $ at 99.73 $\%$ C.L from the SDSS data and $z_f > 9 \times 10^5$, at the same C.L, from the Lyman-$\alpha$ data. If onlya fraction of the dark matter is late forming then we find tentative evidence of the presence of LFDM from the Lyman-$\alpha$ data. Upcoming data from SDSS-III/BOSS (Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey) will allow us to explore this issue in more detail.
  • We study the impact of primordial magnetic fields on the HI absorption from the Epoch of Reionization. The presence of these fields result in two distinct effects: (a) the heating of the haloes from the decay of magnetic fields owing to ambipolar diffusion, and (b) an increase in the number of haloes owing to additional matter fluctuations induced by magnetic fields. We analyse both these effects and show that the latter is potentially observable because the number of haloes along of line of sight can increase by many orders of magnitude. While this effect is not strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength in the range $0.3\hbox{--}0.6$ nG, it is extremely sensitive to the magnetic field power spectral index for the near scale-free models. Therefore the detection of such absorption features could be a sensitive probe of the primordial magnetic field and its power spectrum. We discuss the detectability of these features with the ongoing and future radio interferometers. In particular, we show that LOFAR might be able to detect these absorption features at $z \simeq 10$ in less than 10 hrs of integration if the flux of the background source is 400 mJy.
  • We have observed the DEEP2 galaxies using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope in the frequency band of 610 MHz. There are $\simeq 400$ galaxies in the redshift range $1.24 < z < 1.36$ and within the field of view $\simeq 44'$, of the GMRT dishes. We have coadded the HI 21 cm-line emissions at the locations of these DEEP2 galaxies. We apply stacking on three different data cubes: primary beam uncorrected, primary beam corrected (uniform weighing ) and primary beam corrected (optimal weighing). We obtain a peak signal strength in the range $8\hbox{--}25 \, \rm \mu$Jy/beam for a velocity width in the range $270\hbox{--} 810 \, \rm km \, sec^{-1}$. The error on the signal, computed by bootstrapping, lies in the range $2.5\hbox{--}6 \, \rm \mu$Jy/beam, implying a 2.5--4.7-$\sigma$ detection of the signal at $z \simeq 1.3$. We compare our results with N-body simulations of the signal at $z\simeq 1$ and find reasonable agreement. We also discuss the impact of residual continuum and systematics.
  • From previous studies of the effect of primordial magnetic fields on early structure formation, we know that the presence of primordial magnetic fields during early structure formation could induce more perturbations at small scales (at present 1-10 Mpc/h) as compared to the usual LCDM theory. Matter power spectrum over these scales are effectively probed by cosmological observables such as shear correlation and Ly-alpha clouds, In this paper we discuss the implications of primordial magnetic fields on the distribution of Ly-alpha clouds. We simulate the line of sight density fluctuation including the contribution coming from the primordial magnetic fields. We compute the evolution of Ly-alpha opacity for this case and compare our theoretical estimates of Ly-alpha opacity with the existing data to constrain the parameters of the primordial magnetic fields. We also discuss the case when the two density fields are correlated. Our analysis yields an upper bounds of roughly 0.3-0.6 nG on the magnetic field strength for a range of nearly scale invariant models, corresponding to magnetic field power spectrum index n \simeq -3.
  • The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency, wide field-of-view radio interferometer under development at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia. We have used a 32-element MWA prototype interferometer (MWA-32T) to observe two 50-degree diameter fields in the southern sky in the 110 MHz to 200 MHz band in order to evaluate the performance of the MWA-32T, to develop techniques for epoch of reionization experiments, and to make measurements of astronomical foregrounds. We developed a calibration and imaging pipeline for the MWA-32T, and used it to produce ~15' angular resolution maps of the two fields. We perform a blind source extraction using these confusion-limited images, and detect 655 sources at high significance with an additional 871 lower significance source candidates. We compare these sources with existing low-frequency radio surveys in order to assess the MWA-32T system performance, wide field analysis algorithms, and catalog quality. Our source catalog is found to agree well with existing low-frequency surveys in these regions of the sky and with statistical distributions of point sources derived from Northern Hemisphere surveys; it represents one of the deepest surveys to date of this sky field in the 110 MHz to 200 MHz band.
  • The existence of primordial magnetic fields can induce matter perturbations with additional power at small scales as compared to the usual $\Lambda$CDM model. We study its implication within the context of two-point shear correlation function from gravitational lensing. We show that primordial magnetic field can leave its imprints on the shear correlation function at angular scales $\lesssim \hbox{a few arcmin}$. The results are compared with CFHTLS data, which yields some of the strongest known constraints on the parameters (strength and spectral index) of the primordial magnetic field. We also discuss the possibility of detecting sub-nano Gauss fields using future missions such as SNAP.
  • We use a large N-body simulation to examine the detectability of HI in emission at redshift z ~ 1, and the constraints imposed by current observations on the neutral hydrogen mass function of galaxies at this epoch. We consider three different models for populating dark matter halos with HI, designed to encompass uncertainties at this redshift. These models are consistent with recent observations of the detection of HI in emission at z ~ 0.8. Whilst detection of 21 cm emission from individual halos requires extremely long integrations with existing radio interferometers, such as the Giant Meter Radio Telescope (GMRT), we show that the stacked 21 cm signal from a large number of halos can be easily detected. However, the stacking procedure requires accurate redshifts of galaxies. We show that radio observations of the field of the DEEP2 spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey should allow detection of the HI mass function at the 5-12 sigma level in the mass range 10^(11.4) M_sun/h < M_halo < 10^(12.5)M_sun/h, with a moderate amount of observation time. Assuming a larger noise level that corresponds to an upper bound for the expected noise for the GMRT, the detection significance for the HI mass function is still at the 1.7-3 sigma level. We find that optically undetected satellite galaxies enhance the HI emission profile of the parent halo, leading to broader wings as well as a higher peak signal in the stacked profile of a large number of halos. We show that it is in principle possible to discern the contribution of undetected satellites to the total HI signal, even though cosmic variance limitation make this challenging for some of our models.
  • We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically-relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.
  • We constrain the spectrum of the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation by fitting the observed abundance ratios carbon ions at $z\sim 2\hbox{--}3$ with those expected from different models of the background radiation. We use the recently calculated modulation of the background radiation between 3 and 4 Ryd due to resonant line absorption by intergalactic HeII, and determine the ratios of CIII to CIV expected at these redshifts, as functions of metallicity, gas density and temperature. Our analysis of the observed ratios shows that 'delayed reionization' models, which assume a large fraction of HeII at $z\sim3$, is not favored by data. Our results suggest that HeII reionization was inhomogeneous, consistent with the predictions from recent simulations.
  • By observing mergers of compact objects, future gravity wave experiments would measure the luminosity distance to a large number of sources to a high precision but not their redshifts. Given the directional sensitivity of an experiment, a fraction of such sources (gold plated -- GP) can be identified optically as single objects in the direction of the source. We show that if an approximate distance-redshift relation is known then it is possible to statistically resolve those sources that have multiple galaxies in the beam. We study the feasibility of using gold plated sources to iteratively resolve the unresolved sources, obtain the self-calibrated best possible distance-redshift relation and provide an analytical expression for the accuracy achievable. We derive lower limit on the total number of sources that is needed to achieve this accuracy through self-calibration. We show that this limit depends exponentially on the beam width and give estimates for various experimental parameters representative of future gravitational wave experiments DECIGO and BBO.
  • The implication of primordial magnetic-field-induced structure formation for the HI signal from the epoch of reionization is studied. Using semi-analytic models, we compute both the density and ionization inhomogeneities in this scenario. We show that: (a) The global HI signal can only be seen in emission, unlike in the standard $\Lambda$CDM models, (b) the density perturbations induced by primordial fields, leave distinctive signatures of the magnetic field Jeans' length on the HI two-point correlation function, (c) the length scale of ionization inhomogeneities is $\la 1 \rm Mpc$. We find that the peak expected signal (two-point correlation function) is $\simeq 10^{-4} \rm K^2$ in the range of scales $0.5\hbox{-}3 \rm Mpc$ for magnetic field strength in the range $5 \times 10^{-10} \hbox{-}3 \times 10^{-9} \rm G$. We also discuss the detectability of the HI signal. The angular resolution of the on-going and planned radio interferometers allows one to probe only the largest magnetic field strengths that we consider. They have the sensitivity to detect the magnetic field-induced features. We show that thefuture SKA has both the angular resolution and the sensitivity to detect the magnetic field-induced signal in the entire range of magnetic field values we consider, in an integration time of one week.
  • The emission from neutral hydrogen (HI) clouds in the post-reionization era (z < 6), too faint to be individually detected, is present as a diffuse background in all low frequency radio observations below 1420 MHz. The angular and frequency fluctuations of this radiation (~ 1 mK) is an important future probe of the large scale structures in the Universe. We show that such observations are a very effective probe of the background cosmological model and the perturbed Universe. In our study we focus on the possibility of determining the redshift space distortion parameter, coordinate distance and its derivative with redshift. Using reasonable estimates for the observational uncertainties and configurations representative of the ongoing and upcoming radio interferometers, we predict parameter estimation at a precision comparable with supernova Ia observations and galaxy redshift surveys, across a wide range in redshift that is only partially accessed by other probes. Future HI observations of the post-reionization era present a new technique, complementing several existing one, to probe the expansion history and to elucidate the nature of the dark energy.
  • Aug. 6, 2005 astro-ph
    We investigate the all-sky signal in redshifted atomic hydrogen (HI) line from the reionization epoch. HI can be observed in both emission and absorption depending on the ratio of Lyman-$\alpha$ to ionizing flux and the spectrum of the radiation in soft xray. We also compute the signal from pre-reionization epoch and show that within the uncertainty in cosmological parameters, it is fairly robust. The main features of HI signal can be summarized as: (a) The pre-ionized HI can be seen in absorption for $\nu \simeq 10\hbox{--}40 \rm MHz$; the maximum signal strength is $\simeq 70\hbox{--}100 \rm mK$. (b) A sharp absorption feature of width $\la 5 \rm MHz$ might be observed in the frequency range $\simeq 50 \hbox{--}100 \rm MHz$, depending on the reionization history. The strength of the signal is proportional to the ratio of the Lyman-$\alpha$ and the hydrogen-ionizing flux and the spectral index of the radiation field in soft xray (c) At larger frequencies, HI is seen in emission with peak frequency between $60\hbox{--}100 \rm MHz$, depending on the ionization history of the universe; the peak strength of this signal is $\simeq 50 \rm mK$. From Fisher matrix analysis, we compute the precision with which the parameters of the model can be estimated from a future experiment: (a) the pre-reionization signal can constrain a region in the $\Omega_b h^2$--$\Omega_m h^2$ plane (b) HI observed in emission can be used to give precise, $\la 1 %$, measurement of the evolution of the ionization fraction in the universe, and (c) the transition region from absorption to emission can be used as a probe of the spectrum of ionizing sources; in particular, the HI signal in this regime can give reasonably precise measurement of the fraction of the universe heated by soft x-ray photons.
  • Recent years have seen major advances in understanding the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshift. Some aspects of this understanding are reviewed here. In particular, we discuss: (1) Different probes of IGM like Gunn-Peterson test, CMBR anisotropies, and neutral hydrogen emission from reionization, and (2) some models of reionization of the universe.
  • We explore the ways in which primordial magnetic fields influence the thermal and ionization history of the post-recombination universe. After recombination the universe becomes mostly neutral resulting also in a sharp drop in the radiative viscosity. Primordial magnetic fields can then dissipate their energy into the intergalactic medium (IGM) via ambipolar diffusion and, for small enough scales, by generating decaying MHD turbulence. These processes can significantly modify the thermal and ionization history of the post-recombination universe. We show that the dissipation effects of magnetic fields which redshifts to a present value $B_{0}=3\times 10^{-9}$ Gauss smoothed on the magnetic Jeans scale and below, can give rise to Thomson scattering optical depths $\tau \ga 0.1$, although not in the range of redshifts needed to explain the recent WMAP polarization observations. We also study the possibility that primordial fields could induce the formation of subgalactic structures for $z \ga 15$. We show that early structure formation induced by nano-Gauss magnetic fields is potentially capable of producing the early re-ionization implied by the WMAP data. Future CMB observations will be very useful to probe the modified ionization histories produced by primordial magnetic field evolution and constrain their strength.