• Improvements of in-orbit calibration of GSO scintillators in the Hard X-ray Detector on board Suzaku are reported. To resolve an apparent change of the energy scale of GSO which appeared across the launch for unknown reasons, consistent and thorough re-analyses of both pre-launch and in-orbit data have been performed. With laboratory experiments using spare hardware, the pulse height offset, corresponding to zero energy input, was found to change by ~0.5 of the full analog voltage scale, depending on the power supply. Furthermore, by carefully calculating all the light outputs of secondaries from activation lines used in the in-orbit gain determination, their energy deposits in GSO were found to be effectively lower, by several percent, than their nominal energies. Taking both these effects into account, the in-orbit data agrees with the on-ground measurements within ~5%, without employing the artificial correction introduced in the previous work (Kokubun et al. 2007). With this knowledge, we updated the data processing, the response, and the auxiliary files of GSO, and reproduced the HXD-PIN and HXD-GSO spectra of the Crab Nebula over 12-300 keV by a broken powerlaw with a break energy of ~110 keV.
  • We systematically analyzed the high-quality Suzaku data of 88 Seyfert galaxies. We obtained a clear relation between the absorption column density and the equivalent width of the 6.4 keV line above 10$^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, suggesting a wide-ranging column density of $10^{23-24.5}$ cm$^{-2}$ with a similar solid and a Fe abundance of 0.7--1.3 solar for Seyfert 2 galaxies. The EW of the 6.4 keV line for Seyfert 1 galaxies are typically 40--120 eV, suggesting the existence of Compton-thick matter like the torus with a column density of $>10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ and a solid angle of $(0.15-0.4)*4pi$, and no difference of neutral matter is visible between Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies. An absorber with a lower column density of $10^{21-23}$ cm$^{-2}$ for Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxies is suggested to be not a torus but an interstellar medium. These constraints can be understood by the fact that the 6.4 keV line intensity ratio against the 10--50 keV flux is almost identical within a range of 2--3 in many Seyfert galaxies. Interestingly, objects exist with a low EW, 10--30 eV, of the 6.4 keV line, suggesting that those torus subtends only a small solid angle of $<0.2*4pi$. Ionized Fe-K$\alpha$ emission or absorption lines are detected from several percents of AGNs. Considering the ionization state and equivalent width, emitters and absorbers of ionized Fe-K lines can be explained by the same origin, and highly ionized matter is located at the broad line region. The rapid increase in EW of the ionized Fe-K emission lines at $N_{H}>10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ is found, like that of the cold material. It is found that these features seem to change for brighter objects with more than several $10^{44}$ erg/s such that the Fe-K line features become weak. We discuss this feature, together with the torus structure.
  • We report on a study of the large-scale temperature structure of the Perseus cluster with Suzaku, using the observational data of four pointings of 30' offset regions, together with the data from the central region. Thanks to the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD-PIN: 10 - 60 keV), Suzaku can determine the temperature of hot galaxy clusters. We performed the spectral analysis, by considering the temperature structure and the collimator response of the PIN correctly. As a result, we found that the upper limit of the temperature in the outer region is $\sim$ 14 keV, and an extremely hot gas, which was reported for RXJ 1347.5-1145 and A 3667, was not found in the Perseus cluster. This indicates that the Perseus cluster has not recently experienced a major merger.
  • NGC 4636, an X-ray bright elliptical galaxy, was observed for 70 ks with Suzaku. The low background and good energy resolution of the XIS enable us to estimate the foreground Galactic emission accurately and hence measure, for the first time, the O, Mg, Si and Fe abundances out to a radius of ~28 arcmin ($\simeq$ 140 kpc). These metal abundances are as high as $>$1 solar within the central 4' and decrease by ~50% towards the outer regions. Further, the O to Fe abundance ratio is about 0.60--1.0 solar in all regions analyzed, indicating that the products of both SNe II and SNe Ia have mixed and diffused to the outer regions of the galaxy. The O and Fe metal mass-to-light-ratios (MLR) of NGC 4636 are 2--3 times larger than those of NGC 1399 implying that metal distributions in NGC 4636 are less extended than those in NGC 1399, possibly due to environmental factors, such as frequency of galaxy interaction. We also found that the MLRs of NGC 4636 at 0.1 $r_{180}$ are $\sim$5 times smaller than those of clusters of galaxies, possibly consistent with the correlation between temperature and MLR of other spherically symmetric groups of galaxies. We also confirmed a resonant scattering signature in the Fe$_{XV II}}$ line in the central region, as previously reported using the XMM-Newton RGS.
  • Suzaku Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) achieved the lowest background level than any other previously or currently operational missions sensitive in the energy range of 10--600 keV, by utilizing PIN photodiodes and GSO scintillators mounted in the BGO active shields to reject particle background and Compton-scattered events as much as possible. Because it does not have imaging capability nor rocking mode for the background monitor, the sensitivity is limited by the reproducibility of the non X-ray background (NXB) model. We modeled the HXD NXB, which varies with time as well as other satellites with a low-earth orbit, by utilizing several parameters, including particle monitor counts and satellite orbital/attitude information. The model background is supplied as an event file in which the background events are generated by random numbers, and can be analyzed in the same way as the real data. The reproducibility of the NXB model depends on the event selection criteria (such as cut-off rigidity and energy band) and the integration time, and the 1sigma systematic error is estimated to be less than 3% (PIN 15--40 keV) and 1% (GSO 50--100 keV) for more than 10 ksec exposure.
  • Clusters of galaxies are among the best candidates for particle acceleration sources in the universe, a signature of which is non-thermal hard X-ray emission from the accelerated relativistic particles. We present early results on Suzaku observations of non-thermal emission from Abell 3376, which is a nearby on-going merger cluster. Suzaku observed the cluster twice, focusing on the cluster center containing the diffuse radio emission to the east, and cluster peripheral region to the west. For both observations, we detect no excess hard X-ray emission above the thermal cluster emission. An upper limit on the non-thermal X-ray flux of $2.1\times10^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (15--50 keV) at the 3$\sigma$ level from a $34\times34$ arcmin$^2$ region, derived with the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD), is similar to that obtained with the BeppoSAX/PDS. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) data, the upper limit on the non-thermal emission from the West Relic is independently constrained to be $<1.1\times10^{-12}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ (4$-$8 keV) at the 3$\sigma$ level from a 122 arcmin$^2$ region. Assuming Compton scattering between relativistic particles and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons, the intracluster magnetic field $B$ is limited to be $>0.03\mu$G (HXD) and $>0.10\mu$G (XIS).