• Lyapunov exponents characterize the chaotic nature of dynamical systems by quantifying the growth rate of uncertainty associated with the imperfect measurement of initial conditions. Finite-time estimates of the exponent, however, experience fluctuations due to both the initial condition and the stochastic nature of the dynamical path. The scale of these fluctuations is governed by the Lyapunov susceptibility, the finiteness of which typically provides a sufficient condition for the law of large numbers to apply. Here, we obtain a formally exact expression for this susceptibility in terms of the Ruelle dynamical zeta function for one-dimensional systems. We further show that, for systems governed by sequences of random matrices, the cycle expansion of the zeta function enables systematic computations of the Lyapunov susceptibility and of its higher-moment generalizations. The method is here applied to a class of dynamical models that maps to static disordered spin chains with interactions stretching over a varying distance, and is tested against Monte Carlo simulations.
  • Swarming of animal groups enthralls scientists in fields ranging from biology to physics to engineering. Complex swarming patterns often arise from simple interactions between individuals to the benefit of the collective whole. The existence and success of swarming, however, nontrivially depend on microscopic parameters governing the interactions. Here we show that a machine-learning technique can be employed to tune these underlying parameters and optimize the resulting performance. As a concrete example, we take an active matter model inspired by schools of golden shiners, which collectively conduct phototaxis. The problem of optimizing the phototaxis capability is then mapped to that of maximizing benefits in a continuum-armed bandit game. The latter problem accepts a simple reinforcement-learning algorithm, which can tune the continuous parameters of the model. This result suggests the utility of machine-learning methodology in swarm-robotics applications.
  • Liquids relax extremely slowly on approaching the glass state. One explanation is that an entropy crisis, due to the rarefaction of available states, makes it increasingly arduous to reach equilibrium in that regime. Validating this scenario is challenging, because experiments offer limited resolution, while numerical studies lag more than eight orders of magnitude behind experimentally-relevant timescales. In this work we not only close the colossal gap between experiments and simulations but manage to create in-silico configurations that have no experimental analog yet. Deploying a range of computational tools, we obtain four estimates of their configurational entropy. These measurements consistently confirm that the steep entropy decrease observed in experiments is found also in simulations even beyond the experimental glass transition. Our numerical results thus open a new observational window into the physics of glasses and reinforce the relevance of an entropy crisis for understanding their formation.
  • The transformation of the free-energy landscape from smooth to hierarchical is one of the richest features of mean-field disordered systems. A well-studied example is the de Almeida-Thouless transition for spin glasses in a magnetic field, and a similar phenomenon--the Gardner transition--has recently been predicted for structural glasses. The existence of these replica-symmetry-breaking phase transitions has, however, long been questioned below their upper critical dimension, d_u=6. Here, we obtain evidence for the existence of these transitions in d<d_u using a two-loop calculation. Because the critical fixed point is found in the strong-coupling regime, we corroborate the result by resumming the perturbative series with inputs from a three-loop calculation and an analysis of its large-order behavior. Our study offers a resolution of the long-lasting controversy surrounding phase transitions in finite-dimensional disordered systems.
  • The growing sluggishness of glass-forming liquids is thought to be accompanied by growing structural order. The nature of such order, however, remains hotly debated. A decade ago, point-to-set (PTS) correlation lengths were proposed as measures of amorphous order in glass formers, but recent results raise doubts as to their generality. Here, we extend the definition of PTS correlations to agnostically capture any type of growing order in liquids, be it local or amorphous. This advance enables the formulation of a clear distinction between slowing down due to conventional critical ordering and that due to glassiness, and provides a unified framework to assess the relative importance of specific local order and generic amorphous order in glass formation.
  • Glass-forming liquids grow dramatically sluggish upon cooling. This slowdown has long been thought to be accompanied by a growing correlation length. Characteristic dynamical and static length scales, however, have been observed to grow at different rates, which perplexes the relationship between the two and with the slowdown. Here, we show the existence of a direct link between dynamical sluggishness and static point-to-set correlations, holding at the local level as we probe different environments within a liquid. This link, which is stronger and more general than that observed with locally preferred structures, suggests the existence of an intimate relationship between structure and dynamics in a broader range of glass-forming liquids than previously thought.
  • Cavity point-to-set correlations are real-space tools to detect the roughening of the free-energy landscape that accompanies the dynamical slowdown of glass-forming liquids. Measuring these correlations in model glass formers remains, however, a major computational challenge. Here, we develop a general parallel-tempering method that provides orders-of-magnitude improvement for sampling and equilibrating configurations within cavities. We apply this improved scheme to the canonical Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones model for temperatures down to the mode-coupling theory crossover. Most significant improvements are noted for small cavities, which have thus far been the most difficult to study. This methodological advance also enables us to study a broader range of physical observables associated with thermodynamic fluctuations. We measure the probability distribution of overlap fluctuations in cavities, which displays a non-trivial temperature evolution. The corresponding overlap susceptibility is found to provide a robust quantitative estimate of the point-to-set length scale requiring no fitting. By resolving spatial fluctuations of the overlap in the cavity, we also obtain quantitative information about the geometry of overlap fluctuations. We can thus examine in detail how the penetration length as well as its fluctuations evolve with temperature and cavity size.
  • Glass-forming liquids exhibit a dramatic dynamical slowdown as the temperature is lowered. This can be attributed to relaxation proceeding via large structural rearrangements whose characteristic size increases as the system cools. These cooperative rearrangements are well modeled by instantons in a replica effective field theory, with the size of the dominant instanton encoding the liquid's cavity point-to-set correlation length. Varying the parameters of the effective theory corresponds to varying the statistics of the underlying free-energy landscape. We demonstrate that, for a wide range of parameters, replica-symmetry-breaking instantons dominate. The detailed structure of the dominant instanton provides a rich window into point-to-set correlations and glassy dynamics.
  • We compute critical exponents governing universal features of supercooled liquids through the effective theory of an overlap field. The correlation length diverges with the Ising exponent; the size of dynamically heterogeneous patches grows more rapidly; and the relaxation time obeys a generalized Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation.
  • Starting from a microscopic model of liquids, we construct an effective theory of an overlap field through duplication of the system and coarse-graining. We then propose a recipe to extract a relaxation time and two characteristic length scales of a supercooled liquid from this effective field theory. Appealing to the Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson paradigm near the putative critical point, we further conclude that this effective field theory resides within the Ising universality class.
  • For a generic many-body system, we define a soft point-to-set correlation function. We then show that this function accepts a representation in terms of an effective overlap field theory. In particular, instantons in this effective field theory encode point-to-set correlations for supercooled liquids.
  • We study scale-invariant systems in the presence of Gaussian quenched electric disorder, focusing on the tails of the energy spectra induced by disorder. For relevant disorder we derive asymptotic expressions for the densities of unit-charged states in the tails, positing the existence of saddle points in appropriate disorder integrals. The resultant scalings are dictated by spatial dimensions and dynamical exponents of the systems.
  • For noninteracting particles moving in a Gaussian random potential, there exists a disagreement in the literature on the asymptotic expression for the density of states in the tail of the band. We resolve this discrepancy. Further we illuminate the physical facet of instantons appearing in replica and supersymmetric derivations with another derivation employing a Lagrange multiplier field.
  • We continue our study of quenched disorder in holographic systems, focusing on the effects of mild electric disorder. By studying the renormalization group evolution of the disorder distribution at subleading order in perturbations away from the clean fixed point, we show that electric disorder is marginally relevant in (2+1)-dimensional holographic conformal field theories.
  • We study quenched disorder in strongly correlated systems via holography, focusing on the thermodynamic effects of mild electric disorder. Disorder is introduced through a random potential which is assumed to self-average on macroscopic scales. Studying the flow of this distribution with energy scale leads us to develop a holographic functional renormalization scheme. We test this scheme by computing thermodynamic quantities and confirming that the Harris criterion for relevance, irrelevance or marginality of quenched disorder holds.
  • We abstract the essential features of holographic dimer models, and develop several new applications of these models. First, semi-holographically coupling free band fermions to holographic dimers, we uncover novel phase transitions between conventional Fermi liquids and non-Fermi liquids, accompanied by a change in the structure of the Fermi surface. Second, we make dimer vibrations propagate through the whole crystal by way of double trace deformations, obtaining nontrivial band structure. In a simple toy model, the topology of the band structure experiences an interesting reorganization as we vary the strength of the double trace deformations. Finally, we develop tools that would allow one to build, in a bottom-up fashion, a holographic avatar of the Hubbard model.
  • We holographically engineer a periodic lattice of localized fermionic impurities within a plasma medium by putting an array of probe D5-branes in the background produced by N D3-branes. Thermodynamic quantities are computed in the large N limit via the holographic dictionary. We then dope the lattice by replacing some of the D5-branes by anti-D5-branes. In the large N limit, we determine the critical temperature below which the system dimerizes with bond ordering. Finally, we argue that for the special case of a square lattice our system is glassy at large but finite N, with the low temperature physics dominated by a huge collection of metastable dimerized configurations without long-range order, connected only through tunneling events.
  • We survey recent studies of Gauss-Bonnet gravity and its dual conformal field theories, including their relation to the violation of the Kovtun-Starinets-Son viscosity bound. Via holography, we can also study properties such as microcausality and unitarity of boundary field theory duals. Such studies in turn supply constraints on bulk gravitational theories, consigning some of them to the swampland.
  • Motivated by the vast string landscape, we consider the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in conformal field theories dual to Einstein gravity with curvature square corrections. After field redefinitions these theories reduce to Gauss-Bonnet gravity, which has special properties that allow us to compute the shear viscosity nonperturbatively in the Gauss-Bonnet coupling. By tuning of the coupling, the value of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio can be adjusted to any positive value from infinity down to zero, thus violating the conjectured viscosity bound. At linear order in the coupling, we also check consistency of four different methods to calculate the shear viscosity, and we find that all of them agree. We search for possible pathologies associated with this class of theories violating the viscosity bound.
  • In recent work we showed that, for a class of conformal field theories (CFT) with Gauss-Bonnet gravity dual, the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\eta/s$, could violate the conjectured Kovtun-Starinets-Son viscosity bound, $\eta/s\geq1/4\pi$. In this paper we argue, in the context of the same model, that tuning $\eta/s$ below $(16/25)(1/4\pi)$ induces microcausality violation in the CFT, rendering the theory inconsistent. This is a concrete example in which inconsistency of a theory and a lower bound on viscosity are correlated, supporting the idea of a possible universal lower bound on $\eta/s$ for all consistent theories.
  • We consider the familiar junction conditions described by Israel for thin timelike walls in Einstein-Hilbert gravity. One such condition requires the induced metric to be continuous across the wall. Now, there are many spacetimes with sources confined to a thin wall for which this condition is violated and the Israel formalism does not apply. However, we explore the conjecture that the induced metric is in fact continuous for any thin wall which models spacetimes containing only positive energy matter. Thus, the usual junction conditions would hold for all positive energy spacetimes. This conjecture is proven in various special cases, including the case of static spacetimes with spherical or planar symmetry as well as settings without symmetry which may be sufficiently well approximated by smooth spacetimes with well-behaved null geodesic congruences.