• We report the successful growth of tetragonal FeS film with one or two unit-cell (UC) thickness on SrTiO3(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Large lattice constant mismatch with the substrate leads to high density of defects in single UC FeS, while it has been significantly reduced in double UC thick film due to the lattice relaxation. The scanning tunneling spectra on the surface of FeS thin film reveal the electronic doping effect of single UC FeS from the substrate. In addition, at the Fermi level, the energy gaps of approximate 1.5 meV are observed in films of both thicknesses at 4.6 K and below. The absence of coherence peaks of gap spectra may be related to the preformed Cooper-pairs without phase coherence.
  • By means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on the electronic structures of BiO and SrO planes of Bi2Sr2CuO6+{\delta} (Bi-2201) superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing. Depending on post annealing conditions, the BiO planes exhibit either pseudogap (PG) with sharp coherence peaks and an anomalously large gap of 49 meV or van Hove singularity (VHS) near the Fermi level, while the SrO is always characteristic of a PG-like feature. This contrasts with Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} (Bi-2212) superconductor where VHS occurs solely on the SrO plane. We disclose the interstitial oxygen dopants ({\delta} in the formulas) as a primary cause for the occurrence of VHS, which are located dominantly around the BiO and SrO planes, respectively, in Bi-2201 and Bi-2212. This is supported by the contrasting structural buckling amplitude of BiO and SrO planes in the two superconductors. Our findings provide solid evidence for the irrelevance of PG to the superconductivity in the two superconductors, as well as insights into why Bi-2212 can achieve a higher superconducting transition temperature than Bi-2201, and by implication, the mechanism of cuprate superconductivity.
  • We report on the emergence of two disconnected superconducting domes in alkali-metal potassium (K)-doped FeSe ultra-thin films grown on graphitized SiC(0001). The superconductivity exhibits hypersensitivity to K dosage in the lower-Tc dome, whereas in the heavily electron-doped higher-Tc dome it becomes spatially homogeneous and robust against disorder, supportive of a conventional Cooper-pairing mechanism. Furthermore, the heavily K-doped multilayer FeSe films all reveal a large superconducting gap of ~ 14 meV, irrespective of film thickness, verifying the higher-Tc superconductivity only in the topmost FeSe layer. The unusual finding of a double-dome superconducting phase has stepped towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors.
  • We study the magnetic response of superconducting $\gamma$-Ga via low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The magnetic vortex cores rely substantially on the Ga geometry, and exhibit an unexpectedly-large axial elongation with aspect ratio up to 40 in rectangular Ga nano-strips (width $l$ $<$ 100 nm). This is in stark contrast with the isotropic circular vortex core in a larger round-shaped Ga island. We suggest that the unusual elongated vortices in Ga nanostrips originate from geometric confinement effect probably via the strong repulsive interaction between the vortices and Meissner screening currents at the sample edge. Our finding provides novel conceptual insights into the geometrical confinement effect on magnetic vortices and forms the basis for the technological applications of superconductors.
  • Understanding the mechanism of high transition temperature (Tc) superconductivity in cuprates has been hindered by the apparent complexity of their multilayered crystal structure. Using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on layer-by-layer probing of the electronic structures of all ingredient planes (BiO, SrO, CuO2) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing technique. We show that the well-known pseudogap (PG) feature observed by STM is inherently a property of the BiO planes and thus irrelevant directly to Cooper pairing. The SrO planes exhibit an unexpected Van Hove singularity near the Fermi level, while the CuO2 planes are exclusively characterized by a smaller gap inside the PG. The small gap becomes invisible near Tc, which we identify as the superconducting gap. The above results constitute severe constraints on any microscopic model for high Tc superconductivity in cuprates.
  • Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy have been used to investigate the femtosecond dynamics of Dirac fermions in the topological insulator Bi$_2$Se$_3$ ultrathin films. At two-dimensional limit, bulk electrons becomes quantized and the quantization can be controlled by film thickness at single quintuple layer level. By studying the spatial decay of standing waves (quasiparticle interference patterns) off steps, we measure directly the energy and film thickness dependence of phase relaxation length $l_{\phi}$ and inelastic scattering lifetime $\tau$ of topological surface-state electrons. We find that $\tau$ exhibits a remarkable $(E-E_F)^{-2}$ energy dependence and increases with film thickness. We show that the features revealed are typical for electron-electron scattering between surface and bulk states.
  • The stoichiometric "111" iron-based superconductor, LiFeAs, has attacted great research interest in recent years. For the first time, we have successfully grown LiFeAs thin film by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on SrTiO3(001) substrate, and studied the interfacial growth behavior by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LT-STM). The effects of substrate temperature and Li/Fe flux ratio were investigated. Uniform LiFeAs film as thin as 3 quintuple-layer (QL) is formed. Superconducting gap appears in LiFeAs films thicker than 4 QL at 4.7 K. When the film is thicker than 13 QL, the superconducting gap determined by the distance between coherence peaks is about 7 meV, close to the value of bulk material. The ex situ transport measurement of thick LiFeAs film shows a sharp superconducting transition around 16 K. The upper critical field, Hc2(0)=13.0 T, is estimated from the temperature dependent magnetoresistance. The precise thickness and quality control of LiFeAs film paves the road of growing similar ultrathin iron arsenide films.
  • Topological insulators are a new class of materials, that exhibit robust gapless surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry. The interplay between such symmetry-protected topological surface states and symmetry-broken states (e.g. superconductivity) provides a platform for exploring novel quantum phenomena and new functionalities, such as 1D chiral or helical gapless Majorana fermions, and Majorana zero modes which may find application in fault-tolerant quantum computation. Inducing superconductivity on topological surface states is a prerequisite for their experimental realization. Here by growing high quality topological insulator Bi$_2$Se$_3$ films on a d-wave superconductor Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ using molecular beam epitaxy, we are able to induce high temperature superconductivity on the surface states of Bi$_2$Se$_3$ films with a large pairing gap up to 15 meV. Interestingly, distinct from the d-wave pairing of Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$, the proximity-induced gap on the surface states is nearly isotropic and consistent with predominant s-wave pairing as revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our work could provide a critical step toward the realization of the long sought-after Majorana zero modes.
  • Searching for superconducting materials with high transition temperature (TC) is one of the most exciting and challenging fields in physics and materials science. Although superconductivity has been discovered for more than 100 years, the copper oxides are so far the only materials with TC above 77 K, the liquid nitrogen boiling point. Here we report an interface engineering method for dramatically raising the TC of superconducting films. We find that one unit-cell (UC) thick films of FeSe grown on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) show signatures of superconducting transition above 50 K by transport measurement. A superconducting gap as large as 20 meV of the 1 UC films observed by scanning tunneling microcopy (STM) suggests that the superconductivity could occur above 77 K. The occurrence of superconductivity is further supported by the presence of superconducting vortices under magnetic field. Our work not only demonstrates a powerful way for finding new superconductors and for raising TC, but also provides a well-defined platform for systematic study of the mechanism of unconventional superconductivity by using different superconducting materials and substrates.
  • Superconductor films on semiconductor substrates draw much attention recently since the derived superconductor-based electronics have been shown promising for future data process and storage technologies. By growing atomically uniform single-crystal epitaxial Pb films of several nanometers thick on Si wafers to form a sharp superconductor-semiconductor heterojunction, we have obtained an unusual giant magnetoresistance effect when the Pb film is superconducting. In addition to the great fundamental interest of this effect, the simple structure and compatibility and scalability with current Si-based semiconductor technology offer a great opportunity for integrating superconducting circuits and detectors in a single chip.