• Molecules are the most demanding quantum systems to be simulated by quantum computers because of their complexity and the emergent role of quantum nature. The recent theoretical proposal of Huh et al. (Nature Photon., 9, 615 (2015)) showed that a multi-photon network with a Gaussian input state can simulate a molecular spectroscopic process. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of molecular vibrational spectroscopy of SO$_{2}$ with a trapped-ion system. In our realization, the molecular scattering operation is decomposed to a series of elementary quantum optical operations, which are implemented through Raman laser beams, resulting in a multimode Gaussian (Bogoliubov) transformation. The molecular spectroscopic signal is reconstructed from the collective projection measurements on phonon modes of the trapped-ion system. Our experimental demonstration would pave the way to large-scale molecular quantum simulations, which are classically intractable.
  • A standard method to obtain information on a quantum state is to measure marginal distributions along many different axes in phase space, which forms a basis of quantum state tomography. We theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a general framework to manifest nonclassicality by observing a single marginal distribution only, which provides a novel insight into nonclassicality and a practical applicability to various quantum systems. Our approach maps the 1-dim marginal distribution into a factorized 2-dim distribution by multiplying the measured distribution or the vacuum-state distribution along an orthogonal axis. The resulting fictitious Wigner function becomes unphysical only for a nonclassical state, thus the negativity of the corresponding density operator provides an evidence of nonclassicality. Furthermore, the negativity measured this way yields a lower bound for entanglement potential---a measure of entanglement generated using a nonclassical state with a beam splitter setting that is a prototypical model to produce continuous-variable (CV) entangled states. Our approach detects both Gaussian and non-Gaussian nonclassical states in a reliable and efficient manner. Remarkably, it works regardless of measurement axis for all non-Gaussian states in finite-dimensional Fock space of any size, also extending to infinite-dimensional states of experimental relevance for CV quantum informatics. We experimentally illustrate the power of our criterion for motional states of a trapped ion confirming their nonclassicality in a measurement-axis independent manner. We also address an extension of our approach combined with phase-shift operations, which leads to a stronger test of nonclassicality, i.e. detection of genuine non-Gaussianity under a CV measurement.
  • In classical computational chemistry, the coupled-cluster ansatz is one of the most commonly used $ab~initio$ methods, which is critically limited by its non-unitary nature. The unitary modification as an ideal solution to the problem is, however, extremely inefficient in classical conventional computation. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence that indeed the unitary version of the coupled cluster ansatz can be reliably performed in physical quantum system, a trapped ion system. We perform a simulation on the electronic structure of a molecular ion (HeH$^+$), where the ground-state energy surface curve is probed, energies of excited-states are studied and the bond-dissociation is simulated non-perturbatively. Our simulation takes advantages from quantum computation to overcome the intrinsic limitations in classical computation and our experimental results indicate that the method is promising for preparing molecular ground-states for quantum simulation.