• This paper proposes a new perspective in the enhancement of the closed-loop tracking performance by using the first-order hold (FOH) sensing technique. Firstly, the literature review and fundamentals of the FOH are outlined. Secondly, the performance of the most commonly used zero-order hold (ZOH) and that of the FOH are compared. Lastly, the detailed implementation of the FOH on a pendulum tracking setup is presented to verify the superiority of the FOH over the ZOH in terms of the steady state tracking error. The results of the simulation and the experiment are in agreement.
  • Intrinsic colors of normal stars are derived in the popularly used infrared bands involving the 2MASS/JHKs, WISE, Spitzer/IRAC and AKARI/S9W filters. Based on three spectroscopic surveys -- LAMOST, RAVE and APOGEE, stars are classified into groups of giants and dwarfs, as well as metal-normal and metal-poor stars. An empirical analytical relation of the intrinsic color is obtained with stellar effective temperature (Teff) for each group of stars after the zero-reddening stars are selected from the blue edge in the $J-\lambda$ versus (Teff) diagram. It is found that metallicity has little effect on the infrared colors. In the near-infrared bands, our results agree with previous work. In addition, the color indexes H-W2 and Ks-W1 that are taken as constant to calculate interstellar extinction are discussed. The intrinsic color of M-type stars are derived separately due to lack of accurate measurement of their effective temperature.
  • Based on Kepler data, we present the results of a search for white-light flares on 1049 close binaries. We identify 234 flare binaries, on which 6818 flares are detected. We compare the flare-binary fraction in different binary morphologies ("detachedness"). The result shows that the fractions in over-contact and ellipsoidal binaries are approximately 10-20 percent lower than those in detached and semi-detached systems. We calculate the binary flares activity level (AL) of all the flare binaries, and discuss its variations along the orbital period (P_orb) and rotation period (P_rot, calculated for only detached binaries). We find that AL increases with decreasing P_orb or P_rot up to the critical values at P_orb near 3 days or P_rot near 1.5 days, thereafter, the AL starts decreasing no matter how fast the stars rotate. We examine the flaring rate as a function of orbital phase in 2 eclipsing binaries on which a large number of flares are detected. It appears that there is no correlation between flaring rate and orbital phase in these 2 binaries. In contrast, when we examine the function with 203 flares on 20 non-eclipse ellipsoidal binaries, bimodal distribution of amplitude weighted flare numbers shows up at orbital phase 0.25 and 0.75. Such variation could be larger than what is expected from the cross-section modification.
  • We use about 15,000 F/G nearby dwarf stars selected from the LAMOST pilot survey to map the U-V velocity distribution in the solar neighbourhood. An extreme deconvolution algorithm is applied to reconstruct an empirical multi-Gaussian model. In addition to the well known substructures, e.g., Sirius, Coma Berenices, Hyades-Pleiades over-densities, several new substructures are unveiled. A ripple-like structure from (U, V) = (-120, -5) to (103, -32)km/s is clearly seen in the U-V distribution. This structure seems associated with resonance induced by the Galactic bar, since it is extended in U while having a small dispersion in V at the same time. A ridge structure between (U, V) = (-60, 40) and (-15, 15) km/s is also found. Although similar substructures have been seen in the Hipparcos data, their origin is still unclear. Another compact over-density is seen at (U, V) = (-102, -24). With this large data sample, we find that the substructure located at V~70 km/s and the Arcturus group are essentially parallel in V, which may indicate that they originate from an unrelaxed disk component perturbed by the rotating bar.
  • We estimate the fraction of F,G,K stars with close binary companions by analysing multi-epoch stellar spectra from SDSS and LAMOST for radial velocity (RV) variations. We employ a Bayesian method to infer the maximum likelihood of the fraction of binary stars with orbital periods of 1000 days or shorter, assuming a simple model distribution for a binary population with circular orbits. The overall inferred fraction of stars with such a close binary companion is 43.0% \pm 2.0% for a sample of F, G, K stars from SDSS SEGUE, and 30% \pm 8.0% in a similar sample from LAMOST. The apparent close binary fraction decreases with the stellar effective temperature. We divide the SEGUE and LEGUE data into three subsamples with different metallicity ([Fe/H] < -1.1; -1.1 < [Fe/H] < -0.6; -0.6 < [Fe/H]), for which the inferred close binary fractions are 56% \pm 5.0%, 56.0% \pm 3%, and 30% \pm 5.7%. The metal-rich stars from our sample are therefore substantially less likely to possess a close binary companion than otherwise similar stars drawn from metal-poor populations. The different ages and formation environments of the Milky Way's thin disk, thick disk and halo may contribute to explaining these observations. Alternatively metallicity may have a significant effect on the formation and/or evolution of binary stars.
  • We present a support vector machine classifier to identify the K giant stars from the LAMOST survey directly using their spectral line features. The completeness of the identification is about 75% for tests based on LAMOST stellar parameters. The contamination in the identified K giant sample is lower than 2.5%. Applying the classification method to about 2 million LAMOST spectra observed during the pilot survey and the first year survey, we select 298,036 K giant candidates. The metallicities of the sample are also estimated with uncertainty of $0.13\sim0.29$\,dex based on the equivalent widths of Mg$_{\rm b}$ and iron lines. A Bayesian method is then developed to estimate the posterior probability of the distance for the K giant stars, based on the estimated metallicity and 2MASS photometry. The synthetic isochrone-based distance estimates have been calibrated using 7 globular clusters with a wide range of metallicities. The uncertainty of the estimated distance modulus at $K=11$\,mag, which is the median brightness of the K giant sample, is about 0.6\,mag, corresponding to $\sim30$% in distance. As a scientific verification case, the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stream is clearly identified with the selected K giant sample. Moreover, at about 80\,kpc from the Sun, we use our K giant stars to confirm a detection of stream members near the apo-center of the trailing tail. These rediscoveries of the features of the Sagittarius stream illustrate the potential of the LAMOST survey for detecting substructures in the halo of the Milky Way.
  • A total of $\sim640,000$ objects from LAMOST pilot survey have been publicly released. In this work, we present a catalog of DA white dwarfs from the entire pilot survey. We outline a new algorithm for the selection of white dwarfs by fitting S\'ersic profiles to the Balmer H$\beta$, H$\gamma$ and H$\delta$ lines of the spectra, and calculating the equivalent width of the CaII K line. 2964 candidates are selected by constraining the fitting parameters and the equivalent width of CaII K line. All the spectra of candidates are visually inspected. We identify 230 (59 of them are already in Villanova and SDSS WD catalog) DA white dwarfs, 20 of which are DA white dwarfs with non-degenerate companions. In addition, 128 candidates are classified as DA white dwarf/subdwarfs, which means the classifications are ambiguous. The result is consistent with the expected DA white dwarf number estimated based on the LEGUE target selection algorithm.
  • The weather at Xinglong Observing Station, where the Guo Shou Jing Telescope (GSJT) is located, is strongly affected by the monsoon climate in north-east China. The LAMOST survey strategy is constrained by these weather patterns. In this paper, we present a statistics on observing hours from 2004 to 2007, and the sky brightness, seeing, and sky transparency from 1995 to 2011 at the site. We investigate effects of the site conditions on the survey plan. Operable hours each month shows strong correlation with season: on average there are 8 operable hours per night available in December, but only 1-2 hours in July and August. The seeing and the sky transparency also vary with seasons. Although the seeing is worse in windy winters, and the atmospheric extinction is worse in the spring and summer, the site is adequate for the proposed scientific program of LAMOST survey. With a Monte Carlo simulation using historical data on the site condition, we find that the available observation hours constrain the survey footprint from 22h to 16h in right ascension; the sky brightness allows LAMOST to obtain the limit magnitude of V = 19.5mag with S/N = 10.
  • We describe the footprint and input catalog for bright nights in the LAMOST Pilot Survey, which began in October 2011. Targets are selected from two stripes in the north and south Galactic Cap regions, centered at $\alpha$= 29$^\circ$, with 10$^\circ$ width in declination, covering right ascension of 135$^\circ-290^\circ$ and -30$^\circ$ to 30$^\circ$ respectively. We selected spectroscopic targets from a combination of the SDSS and 2MASS point source catalogs. The catalog of stars defining the field centers (as required by the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor at the center of the LAMOST field) consists of all V < 8m stars from the Hipparcos catalog. We employ a statistical selection algorithm that assigns priorities to targets based on their positions in multidimensional color/magnitude space. This scheme overemphasizes rare objects and de-emphasizes more populated regions of magnitude and color phase space, while ensuring a smooth, well-understood selection function. A demonstration of plate design is presented based on the Shack-Hartmann star catalog and an input catalog that was generated by our target selection routines.
  • We outline the design of the dark nights portion of the LAMOST Pilot Survey, which began observations in October 2011. In particular, we focus on Milky Way stellar candidates that are targeted for the LEGUE (LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration) survey. We discuss the regions of sky in which spectroscopic candidates were selected, and the motivations for selecting each of these sky areas. Some limitations due to the unique design of the telescope are discussed, including the requirement that a bright (V < 8) star be placed at the center of each plate for wavefront sensing and active optics corrections. The target selection categories and scientific goals motivating them are briefly discussed, followed by a detailed overview of how these selection functions were realized. We illustrate the difference between the overall input catalog - Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry - and the final targets selected for LAMOST observation.
  • We describe a general target selection algorithm that is applicable to any survey in which the number of available candidates is much larger than the number of objects to be observed. This routine aims to achieve a balance between a smoothly-varying, well-understood selection function and the desire to preferentially select certain types of targets. Some target-selection examples are shown that illustrate different possibilities of emphasis functions. Although it is generally applicable, the algorithm was developed specifically for the LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (LEGUE) survey that will be carried out using the Chinese Guo Shou Jing Telescope. In particular, this algorithm was designed for the portion of LEGUE targeting the Galactic halo, in which we attempt to balance a variety of science goals that require stars at fainter magnitudes than can be completely sampled by LAMOST. This algorithm has been implemented for the halo portion of the LAMOST pilot survey, which began in October 2011.
  • We have used the self-consistent vertical disc models of the solar neighbourhood presented in Just & Jahreiss (2010), which are based on different star formation histories (SFR) and fit the local kinematics of main sequence stars equally well, to predict star counts towards the North Galactic Pole (NGP). We combined these four different models with the local main sequence in the filter system of the SDSS and predicted the star counts in the NGP field with b>80deg. All models fit the Hess diagrams in the F-K dwarf regime better than 20 percent and the star number densities in the solar neighbourhood are consistent with the observed values. The chi^2 analysis shows that model A is clearly preferred with systematic deviations of a few percent only. The SFR of model A is characterised by a maximum at an age of 10Gyr and a decline by a factor of four to the present day value of 1.4Msun/pc^2/Gyr. The thick disc can be modelled very well by an old isothermal simple stellar population. The density profile can be approximated by a sech^(alpha_t) function. We found a power law index alpha_t=1.16 and a scale height of 800pc corresponding to a vertical velocity dispersion of 45.3km/s. About 6 percent of the stars in the solar neighbourhood are thick disc stars.
  • This paper aims to retrieve the ghost streams under the pre-assumption that all the globular clusters in our Galaxy were formed in the very early merge events. The results are based on two speculations: that the specific energy and angular momentum of the globular clusters after merge are not changed in process of evolution and that the globular clusters with common origin would stay in the same orbit plane as parent galaxy. In addition, taking into account the apo-galacticum distance of the orbits, five possible streams were suggested with a significant confidence. The number of streams is consistent with previous results. Three of the four well established members of the Sagittarius stream were found to be in one of our streams. Several other globular clusters in our result were also thought to come from accretion by previous research. Furthermore, the orbital parameters of the streams are derived, which provide a way to testify whether these streams are true with the help of the accurate measurement of proper motions of the globular clusters.