• Detecting the spectroscopic signatures of Dirac-like quasiparticles in emergent topological materials is crucial for searching their potential applications. Magnetometry is a powerful tool for fathoming electrons in solids, yet its ability for discerning Dirac-like quasiparticles has not been recognized. Adopting the probes of magnetic torque and parallel magnetization for the archetype Weyl semimetal TaAs in strong magnetic field, we observed a quasi-linear field dependent effective transverse magnetization and a strongly enhanced parallel magnetization when the system is in the quantum limit. Distinct from the saturating magnetic responses for massive carriers, the non-saturating signals of TaAs in strong field is consistent with our newly developed magnetization calculation for a Weyl fermion system in an arbitrary angle. Our results for the first time establish a thermodynamic criterion for detecting the unique magnetic response of 3D massless Weyl fermions in the quantum limit.
  • Atomically thin 2D materials span the common components of electronic circuits as metals, semi-conductors, and insulators, and can manifest correlated phases such as superconductivity, charge density waves, and magnetism. An ongoing challenge in the field is to incorporate these 2D materials into multi-layer hetero-structures with robust electrical contacts while preventing disorder and degradation. In particular, preserving and studying air-sensitive 2D materials has presented a significant challenge since they readily oxidize under atmospheric conditions. We report a new technique for contacting 2D materials, in which metal via contacts are integrated into flakes of insulating hexagonal boron nitride, and then placed onto the desired conducting 2D layer, avoiding direct lithographic patterning onto the 2D conductor. The metal contacts are planar with the bottom surface of the boron nitride and form robust contacts to multiple 2D materials. These structures protect air-sensitive 2D materials for months with no degradation in performance. This via contact technique will provide the capability to produce atomic printed circuit boards that can form the basis of more complex multi-layer heterostructures.
  • Weyl semimetals are novel topological conductors that host Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles. While the Weyl fermions in high-energy physics are strictly defined as the massless solution of the Dirac equation and uniquely fixed by Lorentz symmetry, there is no such constraint for a topological metal in general. Specifically, the Weyl quasiparticles can arise by breaking either the space-inversion ($\mathcal{I}$) or time-reversal ($\mathcal{T}$) symmetry. They can either respect Lorentz symmetry (type-I) or strongly violate it (type-II). To date, different types of Weyl fermions have been predicted to occur only in different classes of materials. In this paper, we present a significant materials breakthrough by identifying a large class of Weyl materials in the RAlX (R=Rare earth, Al, X=Ge, Si) family that can realize all different types of emergent Weyl fermions ($\mathcal{I}$-breaking, $\mathcal{T}$-breaking, type-I or type-II), depending on a suitable choice of the rare earth elements. Specifically, RAlX can be ferromagnetic, nonmagnetic or antiferromagnetic and the electronic band topology and topological nature of the Weyl fermions can be tuned. The unparalleled tunability and the large number of compounds make the RAlX family of compounds a unique Weyl semimetal class for exploring the wide-ranging topological phenomena associated with different types of emergent Weyl fermions in transport, spectroscopic and device-based experiments.
  • Ionic liquid gating can markedly modulate the materials' carrier density so as to induce metallization, superconductivity, and quantum phase transitions. One of the main issues is whether the mechanism of ionic liquid gating is an electrostatic field effect or an electrochemical effect, especially for oxide materials. Recent observation of the suppression of the ionic liquid gate-induced metallization in the presence of oxygen for oxide materials suggests the electrochemical effect. However, in more general scenarios, the role of oxygen in ionic liquid gating effect is still unclear. Here, we perform the ionic liquid gating experiments on a non-oxide material: two-dimensional ferromagnetic Cr2Ge2Te6. Our results demonstrate that despite the large increase of the gate leakage current in the presence of oxygen, the oxygen does not affect the ionic liquid gating effect (< 5 % difference), which suggests the electrostatic field effect as the mechanism on non-oxide materials. Moreover, our results show that the ionic liquid gating is more effective on the modulation of the channel resistances compared to the back gating across the 300 nm thick SiO2.
  • Black phosphorus (BP) has emerged as a promising material candidate for next generation electronic and optoelectronic devices due to its high mobility, tunable band gap and highly anisotropic properties. In this work, polarization resolved ultrafast mid-infrared transient reflection spectroscopy measurements are performed to study the dynamical anisotropic optical properties of BP under magnetic fields up to 9 T. The relaxation dynamics of photoexcited carrier is found to be insensitive to the applied magnetic field due to the broadening of the Landau levels and large effective mass of carriers. While the anisotropic optical response of BP decreases with increasing magnetic field, its enhancement due to the excitation of hot carriers is similar to that without magnetic field. These experimental results can be well interpreted by the magneto-optical conductivity of the Landau levels of BP thin film, based on an effective k*p Hamiltonian and linear response theory. These findings suggest attractive possibilities of multi-dimensional controls of anisotropic response (AR) of BP with light, electric and magnetic field, which further introduces BP to the fantastic magnetic field sensitive applications.
  • Weyl nodes are topological objects in three-dimensional metals. Their topological property can be revealed by studying the high-field transport properties of a Weyl semimetal. While the energy of the lowest Landau band (LLB) of a conventional Fermi pocket always increases with magnetic field due to the zero point energy, the LLB of Weyl cones remains at zero energy unless a strong magnetic field couples the Weyl fermions of opposite chirality. In the Weyl semimetal TaP, we achieve such a magnetic coupling between the electron-like Fermi pockets arising from the W1 Weyl fermions. As a result, their LLBs move above chemical potential, leading to a sharp sign reversal in the Hall resistivity at a specific magnetic field corresponding to the W1 Weyl node separation. By contrast, despite having almost identical carrier density, the annihilation is unobserved for the hole-like pockets because the W2 Weyl nodes are much further separated. These key findings, corroborated by other systematic analyses, reveal the nontrivial topology of Weyl fermions in high-field measurements.
  • We address the controversy over the proximity effect between topological materials and high T$_{c}$ superconductors. Junctions are produced between Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+\delta}$ and materials with different Fermi surfaces (Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$ \& graphite). Both cases reveal tunneling spectra consistent with Andreev reflection. This is confirmed by magnetic field that shifts features via the Doppler effect. This is modeled with a single parameter that accounts for tunneling into a screening supercurrent. Thus the tunneling involves Cooper pairs crossing the heterostructure, showing the Fermi surface mis-match does not hinder the ability to form transparent interfaces, which is accounted for by the extended Brillouin zone and different lattice symmetries.
  • A Weyl semimetal (WSM) is a novel topological phase of matter, in which Weyl fermions (WFs) arise as pseudo-magnetic monopoles in its momentum space. The chirality of the WFs, given by the sign of the monopole charge, is central to the Weyl physics, since it directly serves as the sign of the topological number and gives rise to exotic properties such as Fermi arcs and the chiral anomaly. Despite being the defining property of a WSM, the chirality of the WFs has never been experimentally measured. Here, we directly detect the chirality of the WFs by measuring the photocurrent in response to circularly polarized mid-infrared light. The resulting photocurrent is determined by both the chirality of WFs and that of the photons. Our results pave the way for realizing a wide range of theoretical proposals for studying and controlling the WFs and their associated quantum anomalies by optical and electrical means. More broadly, the two chiralities, analogous to the two valleys in 2D materials, lead to a new degree of freedom in a 3D crystal with potential novel pathways to store and carry information.
  • The emergence of two-dimensional (2D) materials has attracted a great deal of attention due to their fascinating physical properties and potential applications for future nanoelectronic devices. Since the first isolation of graphene, a Dirac material, a large family of new functional 2D materials have been discovered and characterized, including insulating 2D boron nitride, semiconducting 2D transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, and superconducting 2D bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide, molybdenum disulphide and niobium selenide, etc. Here, we report the identification of ferromagnetic thin flakes of Cr2Ge2Te6 (CGT) with thickness down to a few nanometers, which provides a very important piece to the van der Waals structures consisting of various 2D materials. We further demonstrate the giant modulation of the channel resistance of 2D CGT devices via electric field effect. Our results illustrate the gate voltage tunability of 2D CGT and the potential of CGT, a ferromagnetic 2D material, as a new functional quantum material for applications in future nanoelectronics and spintronics.
  • In this work, the magneto-resistance (MR) of ultra-thin WTe2/BN heterostructures far away from electron-hole equilibrium is measured. The change of MR of such devices is found to be determined largely by a single tunable parameter, i.e. the amount of imbalance between electrons and holes. We also found that the magnetoresistive behavior of ultra-thin WTe2 devices is well-captured by a two-fluid model. According to the model, the change of MR could be as large as 400,000%, the largest potential change of MR among all materials known, if the ultra-thin samples are tuned to neutrality when preserving the mobility of 167,000 cm2V-1s-1 observed in bulk samples. Our findings show the prospects of ultra-thin WTe2 as a variable magnetoresistance material in future applications such as magnetic field sensors, information storage and extraction devices, and galvanic isolators. The results also provide important insight into the electronic structure and the origin of the large MR in ultra-thin WTe2 samples.
  • We report comprehensive studies of the single crystal growth and electrical transport properties for various samples of TaAs, the first experimentally confirmed inversion symmetry-breaking Weyl semimetal. The transport parameters for different samples are obtained through the fitting of the two band model and the analysis of Shubnikov de Haas oscillations. We find that the ratio factor of transport lifetime to quantum lifetime is intensively enhanced when the Fermi level approaches the Weyl node. This result is consistent with the side-jump interpretation derived from a chirality-protected shift in the scattering process for a Weyl semimetal.
  • Transport and magnetic studies of PbTaSe$_2$ under pressure suggest existence of two superconducting phases with the low temperature phase boundary at $\sim 0.25$ GPa that is defined by a very sharp, first order, phase transition. The first order phase transition line can be followed via pressure dependent resistivity measurements, and is found to be near 0.12 GPa near room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction at elevated temperatures confirm that this first order phase transition is structural and occurs at ambient pressure near $\sim 425$ K. The new, high temperature / high pressure phase has a similar crystal structure and slightly lower unit cell volume relative to the ambient pressure, room temperature structure. Based on first-principles calculations this structure is suggested to be obtained by shifting the Pb atoms from the $1a$ to $1e$ Wyckoff position without changing the positions of Ta and Se atoms. PbTaSe$_2$ has an exceptionally pressure sensitive, structural phase transition with $\Delta T_s/\Delta P \approx - 1700$ K/GPa near 4 K, this first order transition causes an $\sim 1$ K ($\sim 25 \%$) step - like decrease in $T_c$ as pressure is increased through 0.25 GPa.
  • ZrTe$_5$ is a newly discovered topological material. Shortly after a single layer ZrTe$_5$ had been predicted to be a two-dimensional topological insulator, a handful of experiments have been carried out on bulk ZrTe$_5$ crystals, which however suggest that its bulk form may be a three-dimensional topological Dirac semimetal. We report the first transport study on ultra thin ZrTe$_5$ flakes down to 10 nm. A significant modulation of the characteristic resistivity maximum in the temperature dependence by thickness has been observed. Remarkably, the metallic behavior, occurring only below about 150 K in bulk, persists to over 320 K for flakes less than 20 nm thick. Furthermore, the resistivity maximum can be greatly tuned by ionic gating. Combined with the Hall resistance, we identify contributions from a semiconducting and a semimetallic bands. The enhancement of the metallic state in thin flakes are consequence of shifting of the energy bands. Our results suggest that the band structure sensitively depends on the film thickness, which may explain the divergent experimental observations on bulk materials.
  • We report the electrical transport properties for Weyl semimetal TaAs in an intense magnetic field. Series of anomalies occur in the longitudinal magnetoresistance and Hall signals at ultra-low temperatures when the Weyl electrons are confined into the lowest Landau level. These strongly temperature-dependent anomalies are ascribed to the electron-hole pairing instability. Our measurements show that the Weyl semimetal TaAs in the ultraquantum regime provides a good platform for studying electron-electron interaction in topological nontrivial semimetals.
  • Three dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals which can be seen as 3D analogues of graphene have attracted enormous interests in research recently. In order to apply these ultrahigh-mobility materials in future electronic/optoelectronic devices, it is crucial to understand the relaxation dynamics of photoexcited carriers and their coupling with lattice. In this work, we report ultrafast transient reflection measurements of the photoexcited carrier dynamics in cadmium arsenide (Cd3As2), which is one of the most stable Dirac semimetals that have been confirmed experimentally. By using low energy probe photon of 0.3 eV, we probed the dynamics of the photoexcited carriers that are Dirac-Fermi-like approaching the Dirac point. We systematically studied the transient reflection on bulk and nanoplate samples that have different doping intensities by tuning the probe wavelength, pump power and lattice temperature, and find that the dynamical evolution of carrier distributions can be retrieved qualitatively by using a two-temperature model. This result is very similar to that of graphene, but the carrier cooling through the optical phonon couplings is slower and lasts over larger electron temperature range because the optical phonon energies in Cd3As2 are much lower than those in graphene.
  • Topological phases of matter exhibit phase transitions between distinct topological classes. These phase transitions are exotic in that they do not fall within the traditional Ginzburg-Landau paradigm but are instead associated with changes in bulk topological invariants and associated topological surface states. In the case of a Weyl semimetal this phase transition is particularly unusual because it involves the creation of bulk chiral charges and the nucleation of topological Fermi arcs. Here we image a topological phase transition to a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ with changing composition $x$. Using pump-probe ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES), we directly observe the nucleation of a topological Fermi arc at $x_c \sim 7\%$, showing the critical point of a topological Weyl phase transition. For Mo dopings $x < x_c$, we observe no Fermi arc, while for $x > x_c$, the Fermi arc gradually extends as the bulk Weyl points separate. Our results demonstrate for the first time the creation of magnetic monopoles in momentum space. Our work opens the way to manipulating chiral charge and topological Fermi arcs in Weyl semimetals for transport experiments and device applications.
  • We combine quasiparticle interference simulation (theory) and atomic resolution scanning tunneling spectro-microscopy (experiment) to visualize the interference patterns on a type-II Weyl semimetal Mo$_{x}$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for the first time. Our simulation based on first-principles band topology theoretically reveals the surface electron scattering behavior. We identify the topological Fermi arc states and reveal the scattering properties of the surface states in Mo$_{0.66}$W$_{0.34}$Te$_2$. In addition, our result reveals an experimental signature of the topology via the interconnectivity of bulk and surface states, which is essential for understanding the unusual nature of this material.
  • Physicists have discovered a novel topological semimetal, the Weyl semimetal, whose surface features a non-closed Fermi surface while the low energy quasiparticles in the bulk emerge as Weyl fermions. Here they share a brief review of the development and present perspectives on the next step forward.
  • Recently, we presented a paper about the tip-induced superconducting phase on TaAs single crystal (arXiv:1607.00513). A conductance plateau with double conductance peaks at finite bias, sharp double dips and a zero bias conductance peak were observed in the point contact spectra (PCS). These three features in one PCS suggest the possibility of p-wave like superconductivity and Majorana zero modes in the surface. Soon after our paper posted on arXiv, Gayen el al. (arXiv:1607.01405) questioned the underlying mechanism of our observations based on their experimental measurements in conventional superconductors(Pb and Nb) and conclusively indicated that the superconductivity observed in our TaAs crystal is conventional. We disagree with their quick conclusion without any specific study on the TaAs materials. We will explain in the following that for the clean (Z=0) point contact (PC) in ballistic limit, the superconducting transition feature in temperature dependence of PC resistance is expected. And the critical current effect claimed by Gayen el al. cannot explain the observed PCS in our paper.
  • Weyl fermion is a massless Dirac fermion with definite chirality, which has been long pursued since 1929. Though it has not been observed as a fundamental particle in nature, Weyl fermion can be realized as low-energy excitation around Weyl point in Weyl semimetal, which possesses Weyl fermion cones in the bulk and nontrivial Fermi arc states on the surface. As a firstly discovered Weyl semimetal, TaAs crystal possesses 12 pairs of Weyl points in the momentum space, which are topologically protected against small perturbations. Here, we report for the first time the tip induced superconductivity on TaAs crystal by point contact spectroscopy. A conductance plateau and sharp double dips are observed in the point contact spectra, indicating p-wave like unconventional superconductivity. Furthermore, the zero bias conductance peak in low temperature regime is detected, suggesting potentially the existence of Majorana zero modes. The experimentally observed tunneling spectra can be interpreted with a novel mirror-symmetry protected topological superconductor induced in TaAs, which can exhibit zero bias and double finite bias peaks, and double conductance dips in the measurements. Our work can open a broad avenue in search for new topological superconducting phases from topological Weyl materials and trigger intensive investigations for pursuing Majorana fermions.
  • Quantum spin Hall (QSH) materials are two-dimensional systems exhibiting insulating bulk and helical edge states simultaneously. A QSH insulator processes topologically non-trivial edge states protected by time-reversal symmetry, so that electrons can propagate unscattered. Realization of such topological phases enables promising applications in spintronics, dissipationless transport and quantum computations. Presently, realization of such QSH-based devices are limited to complicated heterostructures. Monolayer 1T'-WTe2 was predicted to be semimetallic QSH materials, though with a negative band gap. The quasi-particle spectrum obtained using hybrid functional approach shows directly that the quantum spin Hall gap is positive for monolayer 1T'-WTe2. Optical measurement shows a systematic increase in the interband relaxation time with decreasing number of layers, whereas transport measurement reveals Schottcky barrier in ultrathin samples, which is absent for thicker samples. These three independent pieces of evidence indicate that monolayer 1T'-WTe2 is likely a truly 2-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulator.
  • The search for nontrivial superconductivity in novel quantum materials is currently a most attractive topic in condensed matter physics and material science. The experimental studies have progressed quickly over the past couple of years. In this article, we report systematic studies of superconductivity in Au2Pb single crystals. The bulk superconductivity (onset transition temperature, Tconset= 1.3 K) of Au2Pb is characterized by both transport and diamagnetic measurements, where the upper critical field Hc2 shows unusual quasi-linear temperature dependence. The superconducting gap is revealed by point contact measurement with gold tip. However, when using tungsten (W) tip, which is much harder, the superconducting gap probed is largely enhanced as demonstrated by the increases of both Tconset and upper critical field (Hc2). This can be interpreted as a result of increase in density of states under external anisotropic stress imposed by the tip, as revealed by first-principles calculations. Furthermore, novel phase winding of the pseudospin texture along k-space loops around the Fermi energy is uncovered from the calculations, indicating that the observed superconductivity in Au2Pb may have nontrivial topology.
  • We report theoretical and experimental discovery of Lorentz-violating Weyl fermion semimetal type-II state in the LaAlGe class of materials. Previously type-II Weyl state was predicted in WTe2 materials which remains unrealized in surface experiments. We show theoretically and experimentally that LaAlGe class of materials are the robust platforms for the study of type-II Weyl physics.
  • Local modes caused by defects play a significant role in the thermal transport properties of thermoelectrics. Of particular interest are charge-neutral defects that suppress thermal conductivity, without significantly reducing electrical transport. Here we report a temperature dependent Raman study, that identifies such a mode in a standard thermoelectric material, Bi2Te2Se. One of the modes observed, whose origin has been debated for decades, was shown mostly likely to be an antisite defect induced local mode. The anomalous temperature independent broadening of the local mode is ascribed to the random arrangement of Se atoms. The temperature renormalization of all modes are well explained by an anharmonic model-Klemens's model.
  • Weyl semimetals provide the realization of Weyl fermions in solid-state physics. Among all the physical phenomena that are enabled by Weyl semimetals, the chiral anomaly is the most unusual one. Here, we report signatures of the chiral anomaly in the magneto-transport measurements on the first Weyl semimetal TaAs. We show negative magnetoresistance under parallel electric and magnetic fields, that is, unlike most metals whose resistivity increases under an external magnetic field, we observe that our high mobility TaAs samples become more conductive as a magnetic field is applied along the direction of the current for certain ranges of the field strength. We present systematically detailed data and careful analyses, which allow us to exclude other possible origins of the observed negative magnetoresistance. Our transport data, corroborated by photoemission measurements, first-principles calculations and theoretical analyses, collectively demonstrate signatures of the Weyl fermion chiral anomaly in the magneto-transport of TaAs.