• Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials are unique in the wide variety of structural and electronic phases they exhibit in the two-dimensional (2D) single-layer limit. Here we show how such polymorphic flexibility can be used to achieve topological states at highly ordered phase boundaries in a new quantum spin Hall insulator (QSHI), 1T'-WSe2. We observe helical states at the crystallographically-aligned interface between quantum a spin Hall insulating domain of 1T'-WSe2 and a semiconducting domain of 1H-WSe2 in contiguous single layers grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The QSHI nature of single-layer 1T'-WSe2 was verified using ARPES to determine band inversion around a 120 meV energy gap, as well as STM spectroscopy to directly image helical edge-state formation. Using this new edge-state geometry we are able to directly confirm the predicted penetration depth of a helical interface state into the 2D bulk of a QSHI for a well-specified crystallographic direction. The clean, well-ordered topological/trivial interfaces observed here create new opportunities for testing predictions of the microscopic behavior of topologically protected boundary states without the complication of structural disorder.
  • Edge structure of graphene has a significant influence on its electronic properties. However, control over the edge structure of graphene domains on insulating substrates is still challenging. Here we demonstrate edge control of graphene domains on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by modifying ratio of working-gases. Edge directions were determined with the help of both moir\'e pattern and atomic-resolution image obtained via atomic force microscopy measurement. It is believed that the variation on graphene edges mainly attributes to different growth rates of armchair and zigzag edges. This work demonstrated here points out a potential approach to fabricate graphene ribbons on h-BN.
  • Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are ultra-narrow strips of graphene that have the potential to be used in high-performance graphene-based semiconductor electronics. However, controlled growth of GNRs on dielectric substrates remains a challenge. Here, we report the successful growth of GNRs directly on hexagonal boron nitride substrates with smooth edges and controllable widths using chemical vapour deposition. The approach is based on a type of template growth that allows for the in-plane epitaxy of mono-layered GNRs in nano-trenches on hexagonal boron nitride with edges following a zigzag direction. The embedded GNR channels show excellent electronic properties, even at room temperature. Such in-plane hetero-integration of GNRs, which is compatible with integrated circuit processing, creates a gapped channel with a width of a few benzene rings, enabling the development of digital integrated circuitry based on GNRs.
  • A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • The high temperature superconductivity in single-unit-cell (1UC) FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO)(001) and the observation of replica bands by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) have led to the conjecture that the coupling between FeSe electron and the STO phonon is responsible for the enhancement of Tc over other FeSe-based superconductors1,2. However the recent observation of a similar superconducting gap in FeSe grown on the (110) surface of STO raises the question of whether a similar mechanism applies3,4. Here we report the ARPES study of the electronic structure of FeSe grown on STO(110). Similar to the results in FeSe/STO(001), clear replica bands are observed. We also present a comparative study of STO (001) and STO(110) bare surfaces, where photo doping generates metallic surface states. Similar replica bands separating from the main band by approximately the same energy are observed, indicating this coupling is a generic feature of the STO surfaces and interfaces. Our findings suggest that the large superconducting gaps observed in FeSe films grown on two different STO surface terminations are likely enhanced by a common coupling between FeSe electrons and STO phonons.
  • An extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been observed in several non-magnetic semimetals. Increasing experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that the XMR can be driven by either topological protection or electron-hole compensation. Here, by investigating the electronic structure of a XMR material, YSb, we present spectroscopic evidence for a special case which lacks topological protection and perfect electron-hole compensation. Further investigations reveal that a cooperative action of a substantial difference between electron and hole mobility and a moderate carrier compensation might contribute to the XMR in YSb.
  • High quality WSe2 films have been grown on bilayer graphene (BLG) with layer-by-layer control of thickness using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The combination of angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), and optical absorption measurements reveal the atomic and electronic structures evolution and optical response of WSe2/BLG. We observe that a bilayer of WSe2 is a direct bandgap semiconductor, when integrated in a BLG-based heterostructure, thus shifting the direct-indirect band gap crossover to trilayer WSe2. In the monolayer limit, WSe2 shows a spin-splitting of 475 meV in the valence band at the K point, the largest value observed among all the MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se) materials. The exciton binding energy of monolayer-WSe2/BLG is found to be 0.21 eV, a value that is orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional 3D semiconductors, yet small as compared to other 2D transition metal dichalcogennides (TMDCs) semiconductors. Finally, our finding regarding the overall modification of the electronic structure by an alkali metal surface electron doping opens a route to further control the electronic properties of TMDCs.
  • The direct growth of high-quality, large single-crystalline domains of graphene on a dielectric substrate is of vital importance for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Traditionally, graphene domains grown on dielectrics are typically only ~1 nm with a growth rate of ~1 nm/min or less, the main reason is the lack of a catalyst. Here we show that silane, serving as a gaseous catalyst, is able to boost the graphene growth rate to ~1 um/min, thereby promoting graphene domains up to 20 um in size to be synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on hexagonal boron nitride. Hall measurements show that the mobility of the sample reaches 20,000 cm2/Vs at room temperature, which is among the best for CVD-grown graphene. Combining the advantages of both catalytic CVD and the ultra-flat dielectric substrate, gaseous catalyst-assisted CVD paves the way for synthesizing high-quality graphene for device applications while avoiding the transfer process.
  • To grow precisely aligned graphene on h-BN without metal catalyst is extremely important, which allows for intriguing physical properties and devices of graphene/h-BN hetero-structure to be studied in a controllable manner. In this report, such hetero-structures were fabricated and investigated by atomic resolution scanning probe microscopy. Moirre patterns are observed and the sensitivity of moirre interferometry proves that the graphene grains can align precisely with the underlying h-BN lattice within an error of less than 0.05 degree. The occurrence of moirre pattern clearly indicates that the graphene locks into h-BN via van der Waals epitaxy with its interfacial stress greatly released. It is worthy to note that the edges of the graphene grains are primarily oriented along the armchair direction. The field effect mobility in such graphene flakes exceeds 20,000 cm2/V.s at ambient condition. This work opens the door of atomic engineering of graphene on h-BN, and sheds light on fundamental research as well as electronic applications based on graphene/h-BN hetero-structure.