• What is the optimal number of independent observations from which a sparse Gaussian Graphical Model can be correctly recovered? Information-theoretic arguments provide a lower bound on the minimum number of samples necessary to perfectly identify the support of any multivariate normal distribution as a function of model parameters. For a model defined on a sparse graph with $p$ nodes, a maximum degree $d$ and minimum normalized edge strength $\kappa$, this necessary number of samples scales at least as $d \log p/\kappa^2$. The sample complexity requirements of existing methods for perfect graph reconstruction exhibit dependency on additional parameters that do not enter in the lower bound. The question of whether the lower bound is tight and achievable by a polynomial time algorithm remains open. In this paper, we constructively answer this question and propose an algorithm, termed DICE, whose sample complexity matches the information-theoretic lower bound up to a universal constant factor. We also propose a related algorithm SLICE that has a slightly higher sample complexity, but can be implemented as a mixed integer quadratic program which makes it attractive in practice. Importantly, SLICE retains a critical advantage of DICE in that its sample complexity only depends on quantities present in the information theoretic lower bound. We anticipate that this result will stimulate future search of computationally efficient sample-optimal algorithms.
  • In many engineered systems, optimization is used for decision making at time-scales ranging from real-time operation to long-term planning. This process often involves solving similar optimization problems over and over again with slightly modified input parameters, often under stringent time requirements. We consider the problem of using the information available through this solution process to directly learn the optimal solution as a function of the input parameters, thus reducing the need of solving computationally expensive large-scale parametric programs in real time. Our proposed method is based on learning relevant sets of active constraints, from which the optimal solution can be obtained efficiently. Using active sets as features preserves information about the physics of the system, enables more interpretable learning policies, and inherently accounts for relevant safety constraints. Further, the number of relevant active sets is finite, which make them simpler objects to learn. To learn the relevant active sets, we propose a streaming algorithm backed up by theoretical results. Through extensive experiments on benchmarks of the Optimal Power Flow problem, we observe that often only a few active sets are relevant in practice, suggesting that this is the appropriate level of abstraction for a learning algorithm to target.
  • The optimal power flow problem plays an important role in the market clearing and operation of electric power systems. However, with increasing uncertainty from renewable energy operation, the optimal operating point of the system changes more significantly in real-time. In this paper, we aim at developing control policies that are able to track the optimal set-point with high probability. The approach is based on the observation that the OPF solution corresponding to a certain uncertainty realization is a basic feasible solution, which provides an affine control policy. The optimality of this basis policy is restricted to uncertainty realizations that share the same set of active constraints. We propose an ensemble control policy that combines several basis policies to improve performance. Although the number of possible bases is exponential in the size of the system, we show that only a few of them are relevant to system operation. We adopt a statistical learning approach to learn these important bases, and provide theoretical results that validate our observations. For most systems, we observe that efficient ensemble policies constructed using as few as ten bases, are able to obtain optimal solutions with high probability.
  • Reconstruction of structure and parameters of an Ising model from binary samples is a problem of practical importance in a variety of disciplines, ranging from statistical physics and computational biology to image processing and machine learning. The focus of the research community shifted towards developing universal reconstruction algorithms which are both computationally efficient and require the minimal amount of expensive data. We introduce a new method, Interaction Screening, which accurately estimates the model parameters using local optimization problems. The algorithm provably achieves perfect graph structure recovery with an information-theoretically optimal number of samples, notably in the low-temperature regime which is known to be the hardest for learning. The efficacy of Interaction Screening is assessed through extensive numerical tests on synthetic Ising models of various topologies with different types of interactions, as well as on a real data produced by a D-Wave quantum computer. This study shows that the Interaction Screening method is an exact, tractable and optimal technique universally solving the inverse Ising problem.
  • This paper outlines an optimization framework for choosing fast and reliable control actions in a transmission grid emergency situation. We consider contractual load shedding and generation re-dispatch as exemplary emergency actions. To achieve computational efficiency and scalability, this novel formulation of the robust corrective action optimization is stated in terms of voltages and currents, as opposed to standard formulation in terms of power flows and voltages. The current-voltage formulation is natural for expressing voltage and thermal transmission line constraints, and its major advantage is in the linearity of the power flow equations. The complexity of the current-voltage formulation, which is mainly related to the transformation of voltages and currents into active and reactive power injections, can be largely avoided by stating the cost function directly in terms of currents and using linearized or robust estimates for load and generation constraints. The paper considers five different optimization problem formulations, including the full current-voltage formulation, as well as two convex and two linear approximation to the problem. In a case study on an illustrative case study for the IEEE RTS96 system, we demonstrate pros and cons of the different formulations based on simulations for both normal and contingency operation.
  • As renewable wind energy penetration rates continue to increase, one of the major challenges facing grid operators is the question of how to control transmission grids in a reliable and a cost-efficient manner. The stochastic nature of wind forces an alteration of traditional methods for solving day-ahead and look-ahead unit commitment and dispatch. In particular, the variability of wind generation increases the risk of unexpected overloads and cascading events. To address these questions, we present an N-1 Security and Chance-Constrained Unit Commitment (SCCUC) that includes models of generation reserves that respond to wind fluctuations and models of tertiary reserves that respond to single component outages. We formulate the SCCUC as a mixed-integer, second-order cone problem that limits the probability of failure. We develop a modified Benders decomposition algorithm to solve the problem to optimality and present detailed case studies on the IEEE RTS-96 three-area and the IEEE 300 NESTA test systems. The case studies assess the economic impacts of contingencies and various degrees of wind power penetration and demonstrate the effectiveness and scalability of the algorithm.
  • In this manuscript we review new ideas and first results on application of the Graphical Models approach, originated from Statistical Physics, Information Theory, Computer Science and Machine Learning, to optimization problems of network flow type with additional constraints related to the physics of the flow. We illustrate the general concepts on a number of enabling examples from power system and natural gas transmission (continental scale) and distribution (district scale) systems.
  • We consider the problem of learning the underlying graph of an unknown Ising model on p spins from a collection of i.i.d. samples generated from the model. We suggest a new estimator that is computationally efficient and requires a number of samples that is near-optimal with respect to previously established information-theoretic lower-bound. Our statistical estimator has a physical interpretation in terms of "interaction screening". The estimator is consistent and is efficiently implemented using convex optimization. We prove that with appropriate regularization, the estimator recovers the underlying graph using a number of samples that is logarithmic in the system size p and exponential in the maximum coupling-intensity and maximum node-degree.
  • Higher shares of electricity generation from renewable energy sources and market liberalization is increasing uncertainty in power systems operation. At the same time, operation is becoming more flexible with improved control systems and new technology such as phase shifting transformers (PSTs) and high voltage direct current connections (HVDC). Previous studies have shown that the use of corrective control in response to outages contributes to a reduction in operating cost, while maintaining N-1 security. In this work, we propose a method to extend the use of corrective control of PSTs and HVDCs to react to uncertainty. We characterize the uncertainty as continuous random variables, and define the corrective control actions through affine control policies. This allows us to efficiently model control reactions to a large number of uncertainty sources. The control policies are then included in a chance constrained optimal power flow formulation, which guarantees that the system constraints are enforced with a desired probability. By applying an analytical reformulation of the chance constraints, we obtain a second-order cone problem for which we develop an efficient solution algorithm. In a case study for the IEEE 118 bus system, we show that corrective control for uncertainty leads to a decrease in operational cost, while maintaining system security. Further, we demonstrate the scalability of the method by solving the problem for the IEEE 300 bus and the Polish system test cases.
  • We derive conditions for the propagation of monotone ordering properties for a class of nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation (PDE) systems on metric graphs. For such systems, PDE equations with a general nonlinear dissipation term define evolution on each edge, and balance laws create Kirchhoff-Neumann boundary conditions at the vertices. Initial conditions, as well as time-varying parameters in the coupling conditions at vertices, provide an initial value problem (IVP). We first prove that ordering properties of the solution to the IVP are preserved when the initial conditions and time-varying coupling law parameters at vertices are appropriately ordered. In addition, we prove that when monotone ordering is not preserved, the first crossing of solutions occurs at a graph vertex. We consider the implications for robust optimal control formulations and real-time monitoring involving uncertain dynamic flows on networks, and discuss application to subsonic compressible fluid flow with energy dissipation on physical networks.
  • Optimal power flow (OPF) is the central optimization problem in electric power grids. Although solved routinely in the course of power grid operations, it is known to be strongly NP-hard in general, and weakly NP-hard over tree networks. In this paper, we formulate the optimal power flow problem over tree networks as an inference problem over a tree-structured graphical model where the nodal variables are low-dimensional vectors. We adapt the standard dynamic programming algorithm for inference over a tree-structured graphical model to the OPF problem. Combining this with an interval discretization of the nodal variables, we develop an approximation algorithm for the OPF problem. Further, we use techniques from constraint programming (CP) to perform interval computations and adaptive bound propagation to obtain practically efficient algorithms. Compared to previous algorithms that solve OPF with optimality guarantees using convex relaxations, our approach is able to work for arbitrary distribution networks and handle mixed-integer optimization problems. Further, it can be implemented in a distributed message-passing fashion that is scalable and is suitable for "smart grid" applications like control of distributed energy resources. We evaluate our technique numerically on several benchmark networks and show that practical OPF problems can be solved effectively using this approach.
  • Many products and innovations become well-known and widely adopted through the social interactions of individuals in a population. The Bass diffusion model has been widely used to model the temporal evolution of adoption in such social systems. In the model, the likelihood of a new adoption is proportional to the number of previous adopters, implicitly assuming a global (or homogeneous) interaction among all individuals in the network. Such global interactions do not exist in many large social networks, however. Instead, individuals typically interact with a small part of the larger population. To quantify the growth rate (or equivalently the adoption timing) in networks with limited interactions, we study a stochastic adoption process where the likelihood that each individual adopts is proportional to the number of adopters among the small group of persons he/she interacts with (and not the entire population of adopters). When the underlying network of interactions is a random $k$-regular graph, we compute the sample path limit of the fraction of adopters. We show the limit coincides with the solution of a differential equation which can viewed as a generalization of the Bass diffusion model. When the degree $k$ is bounded, we show the adoption curve differs significantly from the one corresponds to the Bass diffusion model. In particular, the adoption grows more slowly than what the Bass model projects. In addition, the adoption curve is asymmetric, unlike that of the Bass diffusion model. Such asymmetry has important consequences for the estimation of market potential. Finally, we calculate the timing of early adoptions at finer scales, e.g., logarithmic in the population size.
  • We derive a monotonicity property for general, transient flows of a commodity transferred throughout a network, where the flow is characterized by density and mass flux dynamics on the edges with density continuity and mass balance conditions at the nodes. The dynamics on each edge are represented by a general system of partial differential equations that approximates subsonic compressible fluid flow with energy dissipation. The transferred commodity may be injected or withdrawn at any of the nodes, and is propelled throughout the network by nodally located compressors. These compressors are controllable actuators that provide a means to manipulate flows through the network, which we therefore consider as a control system. A canonical problem requires compressor control protocols to be chosen such that time-varying nodal commodity withdrawal profiles are delivered and the density remains within strict limits while an economic or operational cost objective is optimized. In this manuscript, we consider the situation where each nodal commodity withdrawal profile is uncertain, but is bounded within known maximum and minimum time-dependent limits. We introduce the monotone parameterized control system property, and prove that general dynamic dissipative network flows possess this characteristic under certain conditions. This property facilitates very efficient formulation of optimal control problems for such systems in which the solutions must be robust with respect to commodity withdrawal uncertainty. We discuss several applications in which such control problems arise and where monotonicity enables simplified characterization of system behavior.
  • We consider the problem of reconstructing a low rank matrix from a subset of its entries and analyze two variants of the so-called Alternating Minimization algorithm, which has been proposed in the past. We establish that when the underlying matrix has rank $r=1$, has positive bounded entries, and the graph $\mathcal{G}$ underlying the revealed entries has bounded degree and diameter which is at most logarithmic in the size of the matrix, both algorithms succeed in reconstructing the matrix approximately in polynomial time starting from an arbitrary initialization. We further provide simulation results which suggest that the second algorithm which is based on the message passing type updates, performs significantly better.
  • As renewable wind energy penetration rates continue to increase, one of the major challenges facing grid operators is the question of how to control transmission grids in a reliable and a cost-efficient manner. The stochastic nature of wind forces an alteration of traditional methods for solving day-ahead and look-ahead unit commitment and dispatch. In particular, uncontrollable wind generation increases the risk of random component failures. To address these questions, we present an N-1 Security and Chance-Constrained Unit Commitment (SCCUC) that includes the modeling of generation reserves that respond to wind fluctuations and tertiary reserves to account for single component outages. The basic formulation is reformulated as a mixed-integer second-order cone problem to limit the probability of failure. We develop three different algorithms to solve the problem to optimality and present a detailed case study on the IEEE RTS-96 single area system. The case study assesses the economic impacts due to contingencies and various degrees of wind power penetration into the system and also corroborates the effectiveness of the algorithms.
  • Over the past years, the share of electricity production from wind power plants has increased to significant levels in several power systems across Europe and the United States. In order to cope with the fluctuating and partially unpredictable nature of renewable energy sources, transmission system operators (TSOs) have responded by increasing their reserve capacity requirements and by requiring wind power plants to be capable of providing reserves or following active power set-point signals. This paper addresses the issue of efficiently incorporating these new types of wind power control in the day-ahead operational planning. We review the technical requirements the wind power plants must fulfill, and propose a mathematical framework for modeling wind power control. The framework is based on an optimal power flow formulation with weighted chance constraints, which accounts for the uncertainty of wind power forecasts and allows us to limit the risk of constraint violations. In a case study based on the IEEE 118 bus system, we use the developed method to assess the effectiveness of different types of wind power control in terms of operational cost, system security and wind power curtailment.
  • The development of hydraulic fracturing technology has dramatically increased the supply and lowered the cost of natural gas in the United States, driving an expansion of natural gas-fired generation capacity in several electrical inter-connections. Gas-fired generators have the capability to ramp quickly and are often utilized by grid operators to balance intermittency caused by wind generation. The time-varying output of these generators results in time-varying natural gas consumption rates that impact the pressure and line-pack of the gas network. As gas system operators assume nearly constant gas consumption when estimating pipeline transfer capacity and for planning operations, such fluctuations are a source of risk to their system. Here, we develop a new method to assess this risk. We consider a model of gas networks with consumption modeled through two components: forecasted consumption and small spatio-temporarily varying consumption due to the gas-fired generators being used to balance wind. While the forecasted consumption is globally balanced over longer time scales, the fluctuating consumption causes pressure fluctuations in the gas system to grow diffusively in time with a diffusion rate sensitive to the steady but spatially-inhomogeneous forecasted distribution of mass flow. To motivate our approach, we analyze the effect of fluctuating gas consumption on a model of the Transco gas pipeline that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the Northeast of the United States.
  • We consider balanced flows in a natural gas transmission network and discuss computationally hard problems such as establishing if solution of the underlying nonlinear gas flow equations exists, if it is unique, and finding the solution. Particular topologies, e.g. trees, are known to be easy to solve based on a variational description of the gas flow equations, but these approaches do not generalize. In this paper, we show that the gas flow problem can be solved efficiently using the tools of monotone operator theory, provided that we look for solution within certain monotonicity domains. We characterize a family of monotonicity domains, described in terms of Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMI) in the state variables, each containing at most one solution. We also develop an efficient algorithm to choose a particular monotonicity domain, for which the LMI based condition simplifies to a bound on the flows. Performance of the technique is illustrated on exemplary gas networks.
  • We consider a dissipative flow network that obeys the standard linear nodal flow conservation, and where flows on edges are driven by potential difference between adjacent nodes. We show that in the case when the flow is a monotonically increasing function of the potential difference, solution of the network flow equations is unique and can be equivalently recast as the solution of a strictly convex optimization problem. We also analyze the maximum throughput problem on such networks seeking to maximize the amount of flow that can be delivered to the loads while satisfying bounds on the node potentials. When the dissipation function is differentiable we develop a representation of the maximum throughput problem in the form of a twice differentiable biconvex optimization problem exploiting the variational representation of the network flow equations. In the process we prove a special case of a certain monotonicity property of dissipative flow networks. When the dissipation function follows a power law with exponent greater than one, we suggest a mixed integer convex relaxation of the maximum throughput problem. Finally, we illustrate application of these general results to balanced, i.e. steady, natural gas networks also validating the theory results through simulations on a test case.
  • We consider general, steady, balanced flows of a commodity over a network where an instance of the network flow is characterized by edge flows and nodal potentials. Edge flows in and out of a node are assumed to be conserved, thus representing standard network flow relations. The remaining freedom in the flow distribution over the network is constrained by potentials so that the difference of potentials at the head and the tail of an edge is expressed as a nonlinear function of the edge flow. We consider networks with nodes divided into three categories: sources that inject flows into the network for a certain cost, terminals which buy the flow at a fixed price and "internal" customers each withdrawing an uncertain amount of flow, which has a priority and thus it is not priced. Our aim is to operate the network such that the profit, i.e. amount of flow sold to terminals minus cost of injection, is maximized, while maintaining the potentials within prescribed bounds. We also require that the operating point is robust with respect to the uncertainty of customers' withdrawals. In this setting we prove that potentials are monotonic functions of the withdrawals. This observation enables us to replace in the maximum profit optimization infinitely many nodal constraints, each representing a particular value of withdrawal uncertainty, by only two constraints representing the cases where all nodes with uncertainty consume their minimum and maximum amounts respectively. We illustrate this general result on example of the natural gas transmission network. In this enabling example gas withdrawals by consumers are assumed uncertain, the potentials are gas pressures squared, the potential drop functions are bilinear in the flow and its intensity with an added tunable factor representing compression.
  • Due to the increasing amount of electricity generated from renewable sources, uncertainty in power system operation will grow. This has implications for tools such as Optimal Power Flow (OPF), an optimization problem widely used in power system operations and planning, which should be adjusted to account for this uncertainty. One way to handle the uncertainty is to formulate a Chance Constrained OPF (CC-OPF) which limits the probability of constraint violation to a predefined value. However, existing CC-OPF formulations and solutions are not immune to drawbacks. On one hand, they only consider affine policies for generation control, which are not always realistic and may be sub-optimal. On the other hand, the standard CC-OPF formulations do not distinguish between large and small violations, although those might carry significantly different risk. In this paper, we introduce the Weighted CC-OPF (WCC-OPF) that can handle general control policies while preserving convexity and allowing for efficient computation. The weighted chance constraints account for the size of violations through a weighting function, which assigns a higher risk to a higher overloads. We prove that the problem remains convex for any convex weighting function, and for very general generation control policies. In a case study, we compare the performance of the new WCC-OPF and the standard CC-OPF and demonstrate that WCC-OPF effectively reduces the number of severe overloads. Furthermore, we compare an affine generation control policy with a more general policy, and show that the additional flexibility allow for a lower cost while maintaining the same level of risk.
  • Model-based compressed sensing refers to compressed sensing with extra structure about the underlying sparse signal known a priori. Recent work has demonstrated that both for deterministic and probabilistic models imposed on the signal, this extra information can be successfully exploited to enhance recovery performance. In particular, weighted $\ell_1$-minimization with suitable choice of weights has been shown to improve performance in the so called non-uniform sparse model of signals. In this paper, we consider a full generalization of the non-uniform sparse model with very mild assumptions. We prove that when the measurements are obtained using a matrix with i.i.d Gaussian entries, weighted $\ell_1$-minimization successfully recovers the sparse signal from its measurements with overwhelming probability. We also provide a method to choose these weights for any general signal model from the non-uniform sparse class of signal models.
  • Natural gas transmission pipelines are complex systems whose flow characteristics are governed by challenging non-linear physical behavior. These pipelines extend over hundreds and even thousands of miles. Gas is typically injected into the system at a constant rate, and a series of compressors are distributed along the pipeline to boost the gas pressure to maintain system pressure and throughput. These compressors consume a portion of the gas, and one goal of the operator is to control the compressor operation to minimize this consumption while satisfying pressure constraints at the gas load points. The optimization of these operations is computationally challenging. Many pipelines simply rely on the intuition and prior experience of operators to make these decisions. Here, we present a new geometric programming approach for optimizing compressor operation in natural gas pipelines. Using models of real natural gas pipelines, we show that the geometric programming algorithm consistently outperforms approaches that mimic existing state of practice.
  • We study the problem of the existence of a giant component in a random multipartite graph. We consider a random multipartite graph with $p$ parts generated according to a given degree sequence $n_i^{\mathbf{d}}(n)$ which denotes the number of vertices in part $i$ of the multipartite graph with degree given by the vector $\mathbf{d}$. We assume that the empirical distribution of the degree sequence converges to a limiting probability distribution. Under certain mild regularity assumptions, we characterize the conditions under which, with high probability, there exists a component of linear size. The characterization involves checking whether the Perron-Frobenius norm of the matrix of means of a certain associated edge-biased distribution is greater than unity. We also specify the size of the giant component when it exists. We use the exploration process of Molloy and Reed combined with techniques from the theory of multidimensional Galton-Watson processes to establish this result.
  • The property of spatial mixing and strong spatial mixing in spin systems has been of interest because of its implications on uniqueness of Gibbs measures on infinite graphs and efficient approximation of counting problems that are otherwise known to be #P hard. In the context of coloring, strong spatial mixing has been established for regular trees when $q \geq \alpha^{*} \Delta + 1$ where $q$ the number of colors, $\Delta$ is the degree and $\alpha^* = 1.763..$ is the unique solution to $xe^{-1/x} = 1$. It has also been established for bounded degree lattice graphs whenever $q \geq \alpha^* \Delta - \beta$ for some constant $\beta$, where $\Delta$ is the maximum vertex degree of the graph. The latter uses a technique based on recursively constructed coupling of Markov chains whereas the former is based on establishing decay of correlations on the tree. We establish strong spatial mixing of list colorings on arbitrary bounded degree triangle-free graphs whenever the size of the list of each vertex $v$ is at least $\alpha \Delta(v) + \beta$ where $\Delta(v)$ is the degree of vertex $v$ and $\alpha > \alpha ^*$ and $\beta$ is a constant that only depends on $\alpha$. We do this by proving the decay of correlations via recursive contraction of the distance between the marginals measured with respect to a suitably chosen error function.