• Genetic studies often involve quantitative traits. Identifying genetic features that influence quantitative traits can help to uncover the etiology of diseases. Quantile regression method considers the conditional quantiles of the response variable, and is able to characterize the underlying regression structure in a more comprehensive manner. On the other hand, genetic studies often involve high dimensional genomic features, and the underlying regression structure may be heterogeneous in terms of both effect sizes and sparsity. To account for the potential genetic heterogeneity, including the heterogeneous sparsity, a regularized quantile regression method is introduced. The theoretical property of the proposed method is investigated, and its performance is examined through a series of simulation studies. A real dataset is analyzed to demonstrate the application of the proposed method.
  • Variable selection is of increasing importance to address the difficulties of high dimensionality in many scientific areas. In this paper, we demonstrate a property for distance covariance, which is incorporated in a novel feature screening procedure together with the use of distance correlation. The approach makes no distributional assumptions for the variables and does not require the specification of a regression model, and hence is especially attractive in variable selection given an enormous number of candidate attributes without much information about the true model with the response. The method is applied to two genetic risk problems, where issues including uncertainty of variable selection via cross validation, subgroup of hard-to-classify cases and the application of a reject option are discussed.
  • In many scientific and engineering applications, covariates are naturally grouped. When the group structures are available among covariates, people are usually interested in identifying both important groups and important variables within the selected groups. Among existing successful group variable selection methods, some methods fail to conduct the within group selection. Some methods are able to conduct both group and within group selection, but the corresponding objective functions are non-convex. Such a non-convexity may require extra numerical effort. In this paper, we propose a novel Log-Exp-Sum(LES) penalty for group variable selection. The LES penalty is strictly convex. It can identify important groups as well as select important variables within the group. We develop an efficient group-level coordinate descent algorithm to fit the model. We also derive non-asymptotic error bounds and asymptotic group selection consistency for our method in the high-dimensional setting where the number of covariates can be much larger than the sample size. Numerical results demonstrate the good performance of our method in both variable selection and prediction. We applied the proposed method to an American Cancer Society breast cancer survivor dataset. The findings are clinically meaningful and lead immediately to testable clinical hypotheses.
  • High resolution microarrays and second-generation sequencing platforms are powerful tools to investigate genome-wide alterations in DNA copy number, methylation and gene expression associated with a disease. An integrated genomic profiling approach measures multiple omics data types simultaneously in the same set of biological samples. Such approach renders an integrated data resolution that would not be available with any single data type. In this study, we use penalized latent variable regression methods for joint modeling of multiple omics data types to identify common latent variables that can be used to cluster patient samples into biologically and clinically relevant disease subtypes. We consider lasso [J. Roy. Statist. Soc. Ser. B 58 (1996) 267-288], elastic net [J. R. Stat. Soc. Ser. B Stat. Methodol. 67 (2005) 301-320] and fused lasso [J. R. Stat. Soc. Ser. B Stat. Methodol. 67 (2005) 91-108] methods to induce sparsity in the coefficient vectors, revealing important genomic features that have significant contributions to the latent variables. An iterative ridge regression is used to compute the sparse coefficient vectors. In model selection, a uniform design [Monographs on Statistics and Applied Probability (1994) Chapman & Hall] is used to seek "experimental" points that scattered uniformly across the search domain for efficient sampling of tuning parameter combinations. We compared our method to sparse singular value decomposition (SVD) and penalized Gaussian mixture model (GMM) using both real and simulated data sets. The proposed method is applied to integrate genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic data for subtype analysis in breast and lung cancer data sets.
  • In many social, economical, biological and medical studies, one objective is to classify a subject into one of several classes based on a set of variables observed from the subject. Because the probability distribution of the variables is usually unknown, the rule of classification is constructed using a training sample. The well-known linear discriminant analysis (LDA) works well for the situation where the number of variables used for classification is much smaller than the training sample size. Because of the advance in technologies, modern statistical studies often face classification problems with the number of variables much larger than the sample size, and the LDA may perform poorly. We explore when and why the LDA has poor performance and propose a sparse LDA that is asymptotically optimal under some sparsity conditions on the unknown parameters. For illustration of application, we discuss an example of classifying human cancer into two classes of leukemia based on a set of 7,129 genes and a training sample of size 72. A simulation is also conducted to check the performance of the proposed method.
  • We propose a computationally intensive method, the random lasso method, for variable selection in linear models. The method consists of two major steps. In step 1, the lasso method is applied to many bootstrap samples, each using a set of randomly selected covariates. A measure of importance is yielded from this step for each covariate. In step 2, a similar procedure to the first step is implemented with the exception that for each bootstrap sample, a subset of covariates is randomly selected with unequal selection probabilities determined by the covariates' importance. Adaptive lasso may be used in the second step with weights determined by the importance measures. The final set of covariates and their coefficients are determined by averaging bootstrap results obtained from step 2. The proposed method alleviates some of the limitations of lasso, elastic-net and related methods noted especially in the context of microarray data analysis: it tends to remove highly correlated variables altogether or select them all, and maintains maximal flexibility in estimating their coefficients, particularly with different signs; the number of selected variables is no longer limited by the sample size; and the resulting prediction accuracy is competitive or superior compared to the alternatives. We illustrate the proposed method by extensive simulation studies. The proposed method is also applied to a Glioblastoma microarray data analysis.