• In this paper, we report an experiment about the device-independent tests of classical and quantum entropy based on a recent proposal [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 110501 (2015)], in which the states are encoded on the polarization of a biphoton system and measured by the state tomography technology. We also theoretically obtained the minimal quantum entropy for three widely used linear dimension witnesses. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical analysis, demonstrating that lower entropy is needed in quantum systems than that in classical systems under given values of the dimension witness.
  • Single-photon stimulated four wave mixing (StFWM) processes have great potential for photonic quantum information processing, compatible with optical communication technologies and integrated optoelectronics. In this paper, we demonstrate single-photon StFWM process in a piece of optical fiber, with seeded photons generated by spontaneous four wave mixing process (SpFWM). The effect of the single-photon StFWM is confirmed by time-resolved four-photon coincidence measurement and variation of four-photon coincidence counts under different seed-pump delays. According to the experiment results, the potential performance of quantum cloning machine based on the process is analyzed.
  • Teleportation of an entangled state, known as entanglement swapping, plays an essential role in quantum communication and network.Here we report a field-test entanglement swapping experiment with two independent telecommunication band entangled photon-pair sources over the optical fibre network of Hefei city. The two sources are located at two nodes 12 km apart and the Bell-state measurement is performed in a third location which is connected to the two source nodes with 14.7 km and 10.6 km optical fibres. An average visibility of 79.9+/-4.8% is observed in our experiment, which is high enough to infer a violation of Bell inequality. With the entanglement swapping setup, we demonstrate a source independent quantum key distribution, which is also immune to any attack against detection in the measurement site.
  • Classical correlation can be locked via quantum means--quantum data locking. With a short secret key, one can lock an exponentially large amount of information, in order to make it inaccessible to unauthorized users without the key. Quantum data locking presents a resource-efficient alternative to one-time pad encryption which requires a key no shorter than the message. We report experimental demonstrations of quantum data locking scheme originally proposed by DiVincenzo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 067902 (2004)] and a loss-tolerant scheme developed by Fawzi, Hayde, and Sen [J. ACM. 60, 44 (2013)]. We observe that the unlocked amount of information is larger than the key size in both experiments, exhibiting strong violation of the incremental proportionality property of classical information theory. As an application example, we show the successful transmission of a photo over a lossy channel with quantum data (un)locking and error correction.
  • Quantum teleportation faithfully transfers a quantum state between distant nodes in a network, enabling revolutionary information processing applications. Here we report teleporting quantum states over a 30 km optical fiber network with the input single photon state and the EPR state prepared independently. By buffering photons in 10 km coiled optical fiber, we perform Bell state measurement after entanglement distribution. With active feed-forward operation, the average quantum state fidelity and quantum process fidelity are measured to be 0.85 and 0.77, exceeding classical limits of 0.67 and 0.5, respectively. The statistical hypothesis test shows that the probability of a classical process to predict an average state fidelity no less than the one observed in our experiment is less than 2.4E-14, confirming the quantum nature of our quantum teleportation experiment. Our experiment marks a critical step towards the realization of quantum internet in the future.
  • Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) at a wavelength of 532 nm were designed and fabricated aiming to satellite laser ranging (SLR) applications. The NbN SNSPDs were fabricated on one-dimensional photonic crystals with a sensitive-area diameter of 42 um. The devices were coupled with multimode fiber (phi=50um) and exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency of 75% at an extremely low dark count rate of <0.1 Hz. An SLR experiment using an SNSPD at a wavelength of 532 nm was successfully demonstrated. The results showed a depth ranging with a precision of ~8.0 mm for the target satellite LARES, which is ~3,000 km away from the ground ranging station at the Sheshan Observatory.
  • Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.
  • An abnormal increase in the SDE was observed for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) when the bias current (Ib) was close to the switching current (Isw). By introducing the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, we investigated the temporal histogram of the detection counts of an SNSPD under illumination. The temporal information helps us to distinguish photon counts from dark counts in the time domain. In this manner, the dark count rate (DCR) under illumination and the accurate SDE can be determined. The DCR under moderate illumination may be significantly larger than the conventional DCR measured without illumination under a high Ib, which causes the abnormal increase in the SDE. The increased DCR may be explained by the suppression of Isw under illumination.
  • Optical cavity structure has been proven to be a crucial factor for obtaining high detection efficiency in superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD). Practically, complicated fabrication processes may result in a non-ideal optical cavity structure. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of SNSPD fabricated in this study shows unexpected arc-shaped optical cavities which could have originated due to the over-etching of SiO2 layer while defining NbN nanowire. The effects of the arc-shaped optical cavity structure, such as the wavelength dependence of the optical absorption efficiency for different polarization, were analyzed by performing optical simulations using finite-difference time-domain method. The central wavelength of the device is found to exhibit a blue shift owing to the arced cavity structure. This effect is equivalent to the flat cavity with a reduced height. The results may give interesting reference for SNSPD design and fabrication.
  • Jitter is one of the key parameters for a superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD). Using an optimized time-correlated single photon counting system for jitter measurement, we extensively studied the dependence of system jitter on the bias current and working temperature. The signal-to-noise ratio of the single-photon-response pulse was proven to be an important factor in system jitter. The final system jitter was reduced to 18 ps by using a high-critical-current SNSPD, which showed an intrinsic SNSPD jitter of 15 ps. A laser ranging experiment using a 15-ps SNSPD achieved a record depth resolution of 3 mm at a wavelength of 1550 nm.
  • We developed a time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) system based on the low-jitter superconducting nanowire single-photon detection (SNSPD) technology. The causes of jitters in the TCSPC system were analyzed. Owing to the low jitter of the SNSPD technology, a system jitter of 26.8 ps full-width at half-maximum was achieved after optimizing the system. We demonstrated time-of-flight laser ranging at 1550 nm wavelength at a stand-off distance of 115 m, based on this TCSPC system. A depth resolution of 4 mm was achieved directly by locating the centroids of each of the two return signals. Laser imaging was also performed using the TCSPC system. This low-jitter TCSPC system using the SNSPD technology presents great potential in long-range measurements and imaging applications for low-energy-level and eye-safe laser systems