• We investigate the chiroptical response of a single plasmonic nanohelix interacting with a weakly-focused circularly-polarized Gaussian beam. The optical scattering at the fundamental resonance is characterized experimentally, and the chiral behavior of the nanohelix is explained based on a multipole analysis. The angularly resolved emission of the excited nanohelix is verified experimentally and it validates the theoretical results. Further, we study the first higher-order resonance and explain the formation of chiral dipoles in both cases.
  • We show that the highly conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) can successfully be applied as a hole selective front contact in silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. In combination with a superior electron selective heterojunction back contact based on amorphous silicon (a-Si), mono-crystalline n-type silicon (c-Si) solar cells reach power conversion efficiencies up to 14.8% and high open-circuit voltages exceeding 660 mV. Since in the PEDOT:PSS/c-Si/a-Si solar cell the inferior hybrid junction is determining the electrical device performance we are capable of assessing the recombination velocity v_I at the PEDOT:PSS/c-Si interface. An estimated v_I of ~ 400 m/s demonstrates, that while PEDOT:PSS shows an excellent selectivity on n-type c-Si, the passivation quality provided by the formation of a native oxide at the c-Si surface restricts the performance of the hybrid junction. Furthermore, by comparing the measured external quantum efficiency with optical simulations, we quantify the losses due to parasitic absorption of PEDOT:PSS and reflection of the device layer stack. By pointing out ways to better passivate the hybrid interface and to increase the photocurrent we discuss the full potential of PEDOT:PSS as a front contact in SHJ solar cells.
  • The emission rate of a point dipole can be strongly increased in presence of a well-designed optical antenna. Yet, optical antenna design is largely based on radio-frequency rules, ignoring e.g.~ohmic losses and non-negligible field penetration in metals at optical frequencies. Here we combine reciprocity and Poynting's theorem to derive a set of optical-frequency antenna design rules for benchmarking and optimizing the performance of optical antennas driven by single quantum emitters. Based on these findings a novel plasmonic cavity antenna design is presented exhibiting a considerably improved performance compared to a reference two-wire antenna. Our work will be useful for the design of high-performance optical antennas and nanoresonators for diverse applications ranging from quantum optics to antenna-enhanced single-emitter spectroscopy and sensing.
  • Multiexcitonic transitions and emission of several photons per excitation comprise a very attractive feature of semiconductor quantum dots for optoelectronics applications. However, these higher-order radiative processes are usually quenched in colloidal quantum dots by Auger and other non-radiative decay channels. To increase the multiexcitonic quantum efficiency, several groups have explored plasmonic enhancement, so far with moderate results. By controlled positioning of individual quantum dots in the near field of gold nanocone antennas, we enhance the radiative decay rates of monoexcitons and biexcitons by 109 and 100 folds at quantum efficiencies of 60% and 70%, respectively, in very good agreement with the outcome of numerical calculations. We discuss the implications of our work for future fundamental and applied research in nano-optics.
  • Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) currently provides the only direct writing technique for truly three-dimensional nanostructures with geometrical features below 50 nm. Unfortunately, the depositions from metal-organic precursors suffer from a substantial carbon content. This hinders many applications, especially in plasmonics where the metallic nature of the geometric surfaces is mandatory. To overcome this problem a post-deposition treatment with oxygen plasma at room temperature was investigated for the purification of gold containing EBID structures. Upon plasma treatment, the structures experience a shrinkage in diameter of about 18 nm but entirely keep their initial shape. The proposed purification step results in a core-shell structure with the core consisting of mainly unaffected EBID material and a gold shell of about 20 nm in thickness. These purified structures are plasmonically active in the visible wavelength range as shown by dark field optical microscopy on helical nanostructures. Most notably, electromagnetic modeling of the corresponding scattering spectra verified that the thickness and quality of the resulting gold shell ensures an optical response equal to that of pure gold nanostructures.
  • Coupling mechanical degrees of freedom with plasmonic resonances has potential applications in optomechanics, sensing, and active plasmonics. Here we demonstrate a suspended two-wire plasmonic nano-antenna acting like a nano-electrometer. The antenna wires are supported and electrically connected via thin leads without disturbing the antenna resonance. As a voltage is applied, equal charges are induced on both antenna wires. The resulting equilibrium between the repulsive Coulomb force and the restoring elastic bending force enables us to precisely control the gap size. As a result the resonance wavelength and the field enhancement of the suspended optical nano-antenna (SONA) can be reversibly tuned. Our experiments highlight the potential to realize large bandwidth optical nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).
  • The direct writing using a focused electron beam allows for fabricating truly three-dimensional structures of sub-wavelength dimensions in the visible spectral regime. The resulting sophisticated geometries are perfectly suited for studying light-matter interaction at the nanoscale. Their overall optical response will strongly depend not only on geometry but also on the optical properties of the deposited material. In case of the typically used metal-organic precursors, the deposits show a substructure of metallic nanocrystals embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. Since gold-containing precursor media are especially interesting for optical applications, we experimentally determine the effective permittivity of such an effective material. Our experiment is based on spectroscopic measurements of planar deposits. The retrieved permittivity shows a systematic dependence on the gold particle density and cannot be sufficiently described using the common Maxwell-Garnett approach for effective medium.
  • Quantum information technology strongly relies on coupling of optical photons with narrowband quantum systems, such as quantum dots, color centers, and atomic systems. This coupling requires matching the optical wavelength and bandwidth to the desired system, which presents a considerable problem for most available sources of quantum light. Here we demonstrate coupling of alkali dipole transitions with a tunable source of photon pairs. Our source is based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a triply-resonant whispering-gallery mode resonator. For this, we have developed novel wavelength tuning mechanisms, which allow for a coarse tuning to either cesium or rubidium wavelength with subsequent continuous fine-tuning to the desired transition. As a demonstration of the functionality of the source, we performed a heralded single photon measurement of the atomic decay. We present a major advance in controlling the spontaneous down-conversion process, which makes our bright source of single photons now compatible with a plethora of narrow-band resonant systems.
  • We demonstrate a new approach for forming hybrid metal/carbonaceous nanostructures in a controlled direct laser planting process. Au-Ag nanoclusters in amorphous or crystalline carbonaceous matrices are formed with different morphology: nanoparticles, nanoflakes, and nanoflowers. In contrast to other generation techniques our approach is simple, involving only a single laser-induced process transforming supramolecular complexes dissolved in solvent such as acetone, acetophenone, or dichloroethane into hybrid nanostructures in the laser-affected area of the substrate. The morphology of the hybrid nanostructures can be steered by controlling the deposition parameters, the composition of the liquid phase and the type of substrate, amorphous or crystalline. The carbonaceous phase of the hybrid nanostructures consists of hydrogenated amorphous carbon in the case of nanoparticles and of crystalline orthorhombic graphite of nanoscale thickness in the case of flakes and flowers. To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the fabrication of orthorhombic graphite with metal nano inclusions. The remarkable quality and regularity of the micron-sized nanoscale thickness single crystal flakes allows for cutting high resolution nano scale structures, which in combination with the metallic nano inclusions offer much design freedom for creating novel devices for nano photonic applications. The encouraging properties of the nanomaterials with different composition, size and shape stimulate the development of efficient synthesis strategies aimed at fine-tuning the functionality.
  • We report on the realization of an open plane-concave Fabry-P\'erot resonator with a mode volume below $\lambda^3$ at optical frequencies. We discuss some of the less common features of this new microcavity regime and show that the ultrasmall mode volume allows us to detect cavity resonance shifts induced by single nanoparticles even at quality factors as low as $100$. Being based on low-reflectivity micromirrors fabricated on a silicon cantilever, our experimental arrangement provides broadband operation, tunability of the cavity resonance, lateral scanning and promise for optomechanical studies.