• We present Lenstronomy, a multi-purpose open-source gravitational lens modeling python package. Lenstronomy is able to reconstruct the lens mass and surface brightness distributions of strong lensing systems using forward modelling. Lenstronomy supports a wide range of analytic lens and light models in arbitrary combination. The software is also able to reconstruct complex extended sources (Birrer et. al 2015) as well as being able to model point sources. We designed Lenstronomy to be stable, flexible and numerically accurate, with a clear user interface that could be deployed across different platforms. Throughout its development, we have actively used Lenstronomy to make several measurements including deriving constraints on dark matter properties in strong lenses, measuring the expansion history of the universe with time-delay cosmography, measuring cosmic shear with Einstein rings and decomposing quasar and host galaxy light. The software is distributed under the MIT license. The documentation, starter guide, example notebooks, source code and installation guidelines can be found at https://lenstronomy.readthedocs.io.
  • We explore a new technique to measure cosmic shear using Einstein rings. In Birrer et al. (2017), we showed that the detailed modelling of Einstein rings can be used to measure external shear to high precision. In this letter, we explore how a collection of Einstein rings can be used as a statistical probe of cosmic shear. We present a forecast of the cosmic shear information available in Einstein rings for different strong lensing survey configurations. We find that, assuming that the number density of Einstein rings in the COSMOS survey is representative, future strong lensing surveys should have a cosmological precision comparable to the current ground based weak lensing surveys. We discuss how this technique is complementary to the standard cosmic shear analyses since it is sensitive to different systematic and can be used for cross-calibration.
  • We report on SPT-CLJ2011-5228, a giant system of arcs created by a cluster at $z=1.06$. The arc system is notable for the presence of a bright central image. The source is a Lyman Break galaxy at $z_s=2.39$ and the mass enclosed within the 14 arc second radius Einstein ring is $10^{14.2}$ solar masses. We perform a full light profile reconstruction of the lensed images to precisely infer the parameters of the mass distribution. The brightness of the central image demands that the central total density profile of the lens be shallow. By fitting the dark matter as a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile---with a free parameter for the inner density slope---we find that the break radius is $270^{+48}_{-76}$ kpc, and that the inner density falls with radius to the power $-0.38\pm0.04$ at 68 percent confidence. Such a shallow profile is in strong tension with our understanding of relaxed cold dark matter halos; dark matter only simulations predict the inner density should fall as $r^{-1}$. The tension can be alleviated if this cluster is in fact a merger; a two halo model can also reconstruct the data, with both clumps (density going as $r^{-0.8}$ and $r^{-1.0}$) much more consistent with predictions from dark matter only simulations. At the resolution of our Dark Energy Survey imaging, we are unable to choose between these two models, but we make predictions for forthcoming Hubble Space Telescope imaging that will decisively distinguish between them.
  • We study the substructure content of the strong gravitational lens RXJ1131-1231 through a forward modelling approach that relies on generating an extensive suite of realistic simulations. We use a semi-analytic merger tree prescription that allows us to stochastically generate substructure populations whose properties depend on the dark matter particle mass. These synthetic halos are then used as lenses to produce realistic mock images that have the same features, e.g. luminous arcs, quasar positions, instrumental noise and PSF, as the data. We then analyse the data and the simulations in the same way with summary statistics that are sensitive to the signal being targeted and are able to constrain models of dark matter statistically using Approximate Bayesian Computing (ABC) techniques. In this work, we focus on the thermal relic mass estimate and fix the semi-analytic descriptions of the substructure evolution based on recent literature. We are able, based on the HST data for RXJ1131-1231, to rule out a warm dark matter thermal relic mass below 2 keV at the 2$\sigma$ confidence level.
  • We present a simple method to accurately infer line of sight (LOS) integrated lensing effects for galaxy scale strong lens systems through image reconstruction. Our approach enables us to separate weak lensing LOS effects from the main strong lens deflector. We test our method using mock data and show that strong lens systems can be accurate probes of cosmic shear with a precision on the shear terms of $\pm 0.003$ (statistical error) for an HST-like dataset. We apply our formalism to reconstruct the lens COSMOS 0038+4133 and its LOS. In addition, we estimate the LOS properties with a halo-rendering estimate based on the COSMOS field galaxies and a galaxy-halo connection. The two approaches are independent and complementary in their information content. We find that when estimating the convergence at the strong lens system, performing a joint analysis improves the measure by a factor of two compared to a halo model only analysis. Furthermore the constraints of the strong lens reconstruction lead to tighter constraints on the halo masses of the LOS galaxies. Joint constraints of multiple strong lens systems may add valuable information to the galaxy-halo connection and may allow independent weak lensing shear measurement calibrations.
  • We analyze the role of first (leading) author gender on the number of citations that a paper receives, on the publishing frequency and on the self-citing tendency. We consider a complete sample of over 200,000 publications from 1950 to 2015 from five major astronomy journals. We determine the gender of the first author for over 70% of all publications. The fraction of papers which have a female first author has increased from less than 5% in the 1960s to about 25% today. We find that the increase of the fraction of papers authored by females is slowest in the most prestigious journals such as Science and Nature. Furthermore, female authors write 19$\pm$7% fewer papers in seven years following their first paper than their male colleagues. At all times papers with male first authors receive more citations than papers with female first authors. This difference has been decreasing with time and amounts to $\sim$6% measured over the last 30 years. To account for the fact that the properties of female and male first author papers differ intrinsically, we use a random forest algorithm to control for the non-gender specific properties of these papers which include seniority of the first author, number of references, total number of authors, year of publication, publication journal, field of study and region of the first author's institution. We show that papers authored by females receive 10.4$\pm$0.9% fewer citations than what would be expected if the papers with the same non-gender specific properties were written by the male authors. Finally, we also find that female authors in our sample tend to self-cite more, but that this effect disappears when controlled for non-gender specific variables.
  • We present extended modeling of the strong lens system RXJ1131-1231 with archival data in two HST bands in combination with existing line-of-sight contribution and velocity dispersion estimates. Our focus is on source size and its influence on time-delay cosmography. We therefore examine the impact of mass-sheet degeneracy and especially the degeneracy pointed out by Schneider & Sluse (2013) using the source reconstruction scale. We also extend on previous work by further exploring the effects of priors on the kinematics of the lens and the external convergence in the environment of the lensing system. Our results coming from RXJ1131-1231 are given in a simple analytic form so that they can be easily combined with constraints coming from other cosmological probes. We find that the choice of priors on lens model parameters and source size are subdominant for the statistical errors for $H_0$ measurements of this systems. The choice of prior for the source is sub-dominant at present (2% uncertainty on $H_0$) but may be relevant for future studies. More importantly, we find that the priors on the kinematic anisotropy of the lens galaxy have a significant impact on our cosmological inference. When incorporating all the above modeling uncertainties, we find $H_0 = 86.6^{+6.8}_{-6.9}$ km s$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-1}$, when using kinematic priors similar to other studies. When we use a different kinematic prior motivated by Barnab\`e et al. (2012) but covering the same anisotropic range, we find $H_0 = 74.5^{+8.0}_{-7.8}$ km s$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-1}$. This means that the choice of kinematic modeling and priors have a significant impact on cosmographic inferences. The way forward is either to get better velocity dispersion measures which would down weight the impact of the priors or to construct physically motivated priors for the velocity dispersion model.
  • We present a strong lensing modeling technique based on versatile basis sets for the lens and source planes. Our method uses high performance Monte Carlo algorithms, allows for an adaptive build up of complexity and bridges the gap between parametric and pixel based reconstruction methods. We apply our method to a HST image of the strong lens system RXJ1131-1231 and show that our method finds a reliable solution and is able to detect substructure in the lens and source planes simultaneously. Using mock data we show that our method is sensitive to sub-clumps with masses four orders of magnitude smaller than the main lens, which corresponds to about $10^8 M_{\odot}$, without prior knowledge on the position and mass of the sub-clump. The modelling approach is flexible and maximises automation to facilitate the analysis of the large number of strong lensing systems expected in upcoming wide field surveys. The resulting search for dark sub-clumps in these systems, without mass-to-light priors, offers promise for probing physics beyond the standard model in the dark matter sector.
  • We construct a simple phenomenological model for the evolving galaxy population by incorporating pre-defined baryonic prescriptions into a dark matter hierarchical merger tree. Specifically the model is based on the simple gas-regulator model introduced by Lilly et al. 2013 coupled with the empirical quenching rules of Peng et al. 2010/12. The simplest model already does quite well in reproducing, without re-adjusting the input parameters, many observables including the Main Sequence sSFR-mass relation, the faint end slope of the galaxy mass function and the shape of the star-forming and passive mass functions. Compared with observations and/or the recent phenomenological model of Behroozi et al. 2013 based on epoch-dependent abundance-matching, our model also qualitatively reproduces the evolution of the Main Sequence sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) star formation rate density relations, the $M_s - M_h$ stellar-to-halo mass relation and also the $SFR - M_h$ relation. Quantitatively the evolution of sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) is not steep enough, the $M_s - M_h$ relation is not quite peaked enough and, surprisingly, the ratio of quenched to star-forming galaxies around M* is not quite high enough. We show that these deficiencies can simultaneously be solved by ad hoc allowing galaxies to re-ingest some of the gas previously expelled in winds, provided that this is done in a mass-dependent and epoch-dependent way. These allow the model galaxies to reduce an inherent tendency to saturate their star-formation efficiency. This emphasizes how efficient galaxies around M* are in converting baryons into stars and highlights the fact that quenching occurs just at the point when galaxies are rapidly approaching the maximum possible efficiency of converting baryons into stars.