• The skew-normal and related families are flexible and asymmetric parametric models suitable for modelling a diverse range of systems. We focus on the highly flexible extended skew-normal distribution, and consider when interest is in the extreme values that it can produce. We derive the well-known Mills' inequalities and ratio for the univariate extended skew-normal distribution and establish the asymptotic extreme value distribution for the maxima of samples drawn from this distribution. We show that the multivariate maximum of a high-dimensional extended skew-normal random sample has asymptotically independent components and derive the speed of convergence of the joint tail. To describe the possible dependence among the components of the multivariate maximum, we show that under appropriate conditions an approximate multivariate extreme-value distribution that leads to a rich dependence structure can be derived.
  • Risk analysis in the area of insurance, financial and risk management is concerned with the study of the joint probability that multiple extreme events take place simultaneously. Extreme Value Theory provides tools for estimating such a type of probability. When aggregate data such as maxima of a random number of observations (risks), few results are available, and this is especially true in high dimensions. To fill this gap, we derive the asymptotic distribution of normalized maxima of multivariate risks, under appropriate conditions on the random number of observations. Of the latter we derive the extremal dependence which is for heavy-tailed scenarios stronger than the dependence among the usual multivariate maxima described in the classical theory. We establish the connection between the two dependence structures through random scaling and Pickands dependence functions. By means of the so-called inverse problem, we construct a semiparametric estimator for the extremal dependence of the unobservable data, starting from an estimator of the extremal dependence obtained with the aggregated data. We develop the asymptotic theory of the estimator and further explore by a simulation study its finite-sample performance.
  • A simple approach for modeling multivariate extremes is to consider the vector of component-wise maxima and their max-stable distributions. The extremal dependence can be inferred by estimating the angular measure or, alternatively, the Pickands dependence function. We propose a nonparametric Bayesian model that allows, in the bivariate case, the simultaneous estimation of both functional representations through the use of polynomials in the Bernstein form. The constraints required to provide a valid extremal dependence are addressed in a straightforward manner, by placing a prior on the coefficients of the Bernstein polynomials which gives probability one to the set of valid functions. The prior is extended to the polynomial degree, making our approach fully nonparametric. Although the analytical expression of the posterior is unknown, inference is possible via a trans-dimensional MCMC scheme. We show the efficiency of the proposed methodology by means of a simulation study. The extremal behaviour of log-returns of daily exchange rates between the Pound Sterling vs the U.S. Dollar and the Pound Sterling vs the Japanese Yen is analysed for illustrative purposes.
  • Skew-symmetric families of distributions such as the skew-normal and skew-$t$ represent supersets of the normal and $t$ distributions, and they exhibit richer classes of extremal behaviour. By defining a non-stationary skew-normal process, which allows the easy handling of positive definite, non-stationary covariance functions, we derive a new family of max-stable processes - the extremal-skew-$t$ process. This process is a superset of non-stationary processes that include the stationary extremal-$t$ processes. We provide the spectral representation and the resulting angular densities of the extremal-skew-$t$ process, and illustrate its practical implementation (Includes Supporting Information).
  • Extreme values of real phenomena are events that occur with low frequency, but can have a large impact on real life. These are, in many practical problems, high-dimensional by nature (e.g. Tawn, 1990; Coles and Tawn, 1991). To study these events is of fundamental importance. For this purpose, probabilistic models and statistical methods are in high demand. There are several approaches to modelling multivariate extremes as described in Falk et al. (2011), linked to some extent. We describe an approach for deriving multivariate extreme value models and we illustrate the main features of some flexible extremal dependence models. We compare them by showing their utility with a real data application, in particular analyzing the extremal dependence among several pollutants recorded in the city of Leeds, UK.
  • The last decade has seen max-stable processes emerge as a common tool for the statistical modeling of spatial extremes. However, their application is complicated due to the unavailability of the multivariate density function, and so likelihood-based methods remain far from providing a complete and flexible framework for inference. In this article we develop inferentially practical, likelihood-based methods for fitting max-stable processes derived from a composite-likelihood approach. The procedure is sufficiently reliable and versatile to permit the simultaneous modeling of marginal and dependence parameters in the spatial context at a moderate computational cost. The utility of this methodology is examined via simulation, and illustrated by the analysis of U.S. precipitation extremes.