• Correlated superconductors are a fertile ground to search for new emergent phenomena. We utilize a combination of vector magnetic field and scanning tunneling microscopy to elucidate the 3D field based electronic phase diagram of a correlated iron-based superconductor for the first time. We observe that applying fields under zero-field-cooling generates a hexagonal vortex lattice ground-state. Remarkably, a field oriented perpendicular to the surface leads to a phase transition into a four-fold-symmetric state, whereas tilting the field off-axis leads to nematic-like elliptical responses. An unconventional magnetic pair-breaking effect resonating at distinct wave vectors is observed, which correlates with the anisotropy of the topological defects but in a non-Abrikosov-Gor'kov scenario. Our demonstration of novel manipulation of 3D topological defects and its correlation with Cooper pairing not only provides new insights into the entanglement between the Fermi surface topology, superconducting order parameter and the emergent vortex matter, but opens new frontiers in elucidating the interplay between many-body physics and topology in quantum materials.
  • We use photoemission spectroscopy to discover the first topological magnet in three dimensions, the material Co$_2$MnGa.
  • The surface of superconducting topological insulators (STIs) has been recognized as an effective $p\pm ip$ superconductivity platform for realizing elusive Majorana fermions. Chiral Majorana modes (CMMs), which are different from Majorana bound states localized at points, can be achieved readily in experiments by depositing a ferromagnetic overlayer on top of the STI surface. Here we simulate this heterostructure by employing a realistic tight-binding model and show that the CMM appears on the edge of the ferromagnetic islands only after the superconducting gap is inverted by the exchange coupling between the ferromagnet and the STI. In addition, multiple CMMs can be generated by tuning the chemical potential of the topological insulator. These results can be applied to both proximity-effect induced superconductivity in topological insulators and intrinsic STI compounds such as PbTaSe$_2$, BiPd and their chemical analogues, providing a route to engineering CMMs in those materials.
  • Topological phases of matter exhibit phase transitions between distinct topological classes. These phase transitions are exotic in that they do not fall within the traditional Ginzburg-Landau paradigm but are instead associated with changes in bulk topological invariants and associated topological surface states. In the case of a Weyl semimetal this phase transition is particularly unusual because it involves the creation of bulk chiral charges and the nucleation of topological Fermi arcs. Here we image a topological phase transition to a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ with changing composition $x$. Using pump-probe ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES), we directly observe the nucleation of a topological Fermi arc at $x_c \sim 7\%$, showing the critical point of a topological Weyl phase transition. For Mo dopings $x < x_c$, we observe no Fermi arc, while for $x > x_c$, the Fermi arc gradually extends as the bulk Weyl points separate. Our results demonstrate for the first time the creation of magnetic monopoles in momentum space. Our work opens the way to manipulating chiral charge and topological Fermi arcs in Weyl semimetals for transport experiments and device applications.
  • The recent explosion of research interest in Weyl semimetals has led to many proposed Weyl semimetal candidates and a few experimental observations of a Weyl semimetal in real materials. Through this experience, we have come to appreciate that typical Weyl semimetals host many Weyl points. For instance, the first Weyl semimetal observed in experiment, TaAs, hosts 24 Weyl points. Similarly, the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series, recently under study as the first Type II Weyl semimetal, has eight Weyl points. However, it is well-understood that for a Weyl semimetal without inversion symmetry but with time-reversal symmetry, the minimum number of Weyl points is four. Realizing such a minimal Weyl semimetal is fundamentally relevant because it would offer the simplest "hydrogen atom" example of an inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. At the same time, transport experiments and device applications may be simpler in a system with as few Weyl points as possible. Recently, TaIrTe$_4$ has been predicted to be a minimal, inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. However, crucially, the Weyl points and Fermi arcs live entirely above the Fermi level, making them inaccessible to conventional angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Here we use pump-probe ARPES to directly access the band structure above the Fermi level in TaIrTe$_4$. We directly observe Weyl points and topological Fermi arcs, showing that TaIrTe$_4$ is a Weyl semimetal. We find that, in total, TaIrTe$_4$ has four Weyl points, providing the first example of a minimal inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. Our results hold promise for accessing exotic transport phenomena arising in Weyl semimetals in a real material.