• We propose and experimentally demonstrate a photonic routing architecture that can efficiently utilize the space of multi-plane (3D) photonic integration. A wafer with three planes of amorphous silicon waveguides was fabricated and characterized, demonstrating $<3\times10^{-4}$ dB loss per out-of-plane waveguide crossing, $0.05 \pm 0.02 $ dB per interplane coupler, and microring resonators on three planes with a quality factors up to $8.2 \times 10^{4}$. We also explore a phase velocity mapping strategy to mitigate the crosstalk between co-propagating waveguides on different planes. These results expand the utility of 3D photonic integration for applications such as optical interconnects, neuromorphic computing and optical phased arrays.
  • We demonstrate cryogenic, electrically-injected, waveguide-coupled Si light-emitting diodes (LEDs) operating at 1.22 $\mu$m. The active region of the LED consists of W centers implanted in the intrinsic region of a $p$-$i$-$n$ diode. The LEDs are integrated on waveguides with superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). We demonstrate the scalability of this platform with an LED coupled to eleven SNSPDs in a single integrated photonic device. Such on-chip optical links may be useful for quantum information or neuromorphic computing applications.
  • A silicon-compatible light source is the final missing piece for completing high-speed, low-power on-chip optical interconnects. In this paper, we present a germanium-based light emitter that encompasses all the aspects of potential low-threshold lasers: highly strained germanium gain medium, strain-induced pseudo-heterostructure, and high-Q optical cavity. Our light emitting structure presents greatly enhanced photoluminescence into cavity modes with measured quality factors of up to 2,000. The emission wavelength is tuned over more than 400 nm with a single lithography step. We find increased optical gain in optical cavities formed with germanium under high (>2.3%) tensile strain. Through quantitative analysis of gain/loss mechanisms, we find that free carrier absorption from the hole bands dominates the gain, resulting in no net gain even from highly strained, n-type doped germanium.
  • Engineering the electromagnetic environment of a nanoscale light emitter by a photonic cavity can significantly enhance its spontaneous emission rate through cavity quantum electrodynamics in the Purcell regime. This effect can greatly reduce the lasing threshold of the emitter, providing the ultimate low-threshold laser system with small footprint, low power consumption and ultrafast modulation. A state-of-the-art ultra-low threshold nanolaser has been successfully developed though embedding quantum dots into photonic crystal cavity (PhCC). However, several core challenges impede the practical applications of this architecture, including the random positions and compositional fluctuations of the dots, extreme difficulty in current injection, and lack of compatibility with electronic circuits. Here, we report a new strategy to lase, where atomically thin crystalline semiconductor, i.e., a tungsten-diselenide (WSe2) monolayer, is nondestructively and deterministically introduced as a gain medium at the surface of a pre-fabricated PhCC. A new type of continuous-wave nanolaser operating in the visible regime is achieved with an optical pumping threshold as low as 27 nW at 130 K, similar to the value achieved in quantum dot PhCC lasers. The key to the lasing action lies in the monolayer nature of the gain medium, which confines direct-gap excitons to within 1 nm of the PhCC surface. The surface-gain geometry allows unprecedented accessibilities to multi-functionalize the gain, enabling electrically pumped operation. Our scheme is scalable and compatible with integrated photonics for on-chip optical communication technologies.
  • We present the design, fabrication and characterization of cubic (3C) silicon carbide microdisk resonators with high quality factor modes at visible and near infrared wavelengths (600 - 950 nm). Whispering gallery modes with quality factors as high as 2,300 and corresponding mode volumes V ~ 2 ({\lambda}/n)^3 are measured using laser scanning confocal microscopy at room temperature. We obtain excellent correspondence between transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarized resonances simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and those observed in experiment. These structures based on ensembles of optically active impurities in 3C-SiC resonators could play an important role in diverse applications of nonlinear and quantum photonics, including low power optical switching and quantum memories.
  • We demonstrate the design, fabrication and characterization of nanobeam cavities with multiple higher order modes. Designs with two high Q modes with frequency separations of an octave are introduced, and we fabricate such cavities exhibiting resonances with wavelength separations of up to 740 nm.
  • We use the third- and fourth-order autocorrelation functions $g^{(3)}(\tau_1,\tau_2)$ and $g^{(4)}(\tau_1,\tau_2, \tau_3)$ to detect the non-classical character of the light transmitted through a photonic-crystal nanocavity containing a strongly-coupled quantum dot probed with a train of coherent light pulses. We contrast the value of $g^{(3)}(0, 0)$ with the conventionally used $g^{(2)}(0)$ and demonstrate that in addition to being necessary for detecting two-photon states emitted by a low-intensity source, $g^{(3)}$ provides a more clear indication of the non-classical character of a light source. We also present preliminary data that demonstrates bunching in the fourth-order autocorrelation function $g^{(4)}(\tau_1,\tau_2, \tau_3)$ as the first step toward detecting three-photon states.
  • We demonstrate second harmonic generation in photonic crystal cavities in (001) and (111)B oriented GaAs. The fundamental resonance is at 1800 nm, leading to second harmonic below the GaAs bandgap. Below-bandgap operation minimizes absorption of the second harmonic and two photon absorption of the pump. Photonic crystal cavities were fabricated in both orientations at various in-plane rotations of the GaAs substrate. The rotation dependence and farfield patterns of the second harmonic match simulation. We observe similar maximum efficiencies of 1.2 %/W in (001) and (111)B oriented GaAs.
  • We demonstrate second harmonic generation at telecommunications wavelengths in L3 photonic crystal cavities in (111)-oriented GaAs. The second harmonic power from photonic crystal cavities fabricated in (111)-oriented GaAs is significantly increased compared to those fabricated in conventional (001)-oriented GaAs.
  • We demonstrate the design, fabrication and characterization of nanobeam photonic crystal cavities in (111)-GaAs with multiple high quality factor modes, with large frequency separations (up to 740 nm in experiment, i.e., a factor of 1.5 and up to an octave in theory). Such structures are crucial for efficient implementation of nonlinear frequency conversion. Here, we employ them to demonstrate sum frequency generation from 1300 nm and 1950 nm to 780 nm. These wavelengths are particularly interesting for quantum frequency conversion between Si vacancy centers in diamond and the fiber optic network.
  • We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities from cubic (3C) thin films (thickness ~ 200 nm) of silicon carbide (SiC) grown epitaxially on a silicon substrate. We demonstrate cavity resonances across the telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1,250 - 1,600 nm. Finally, we discuss possible applications in nonlinear optics, optical interconnects, and quantum information science.
  • Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have emerged as new optoelectronic materials in the two dimensional (2D) limit, exhibiting rich spin-valley interplays, tunable excitonic effects, and strong light-matter interactions. An essential yet undeveloped ingredient for many photonic applications is the manipulation of its light emission. Here we demonstrate the control of excitonic light emission from monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) in an integrated photonic structure, achieved by transferring one monolayer onto a photonic crystal (PhC) with a cavity. In addition to the observation of greatly enhanced (~60 times) photoluminescence of WSe2 and an effectively coupled cavity-mode emission, we are able to redistribute the emitted photons both polarly and azimuthally in the far field through designing PhC structures, as revealed by momentum-resolved microscopy. A 2D optical antenna is thus constructed. Our work suggests a new way of manipulating photons in hybrid 2D photonics, important for future energy efficient optoelectronics and 2D nano-lasers.
  • Fast, high efficiency, and low error single photon sources are required for implementation of a number of quantum information processing applications. The fastest triggered single photon sources to date have been demonstrated using epitaxially grown semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), which can be conveniently integrated with optical microcavities. Recent advances in QD technology, including demonstrations of high temperature and telecommunications wavelength single photon emission, have made QD single photon sources more practical. Here we discuss the applications of single photon sources and their various requirements, before reviewing the progress made on a quantum dot platform in meeting these requirements.
  • Indistinguishable single photons are necessary for quantum information processing applications. Resonant or quasiresonant excitation of single quantum dots provides greater single photon indistinguishability than incoherent pumping, but is also more challenging experimentally. Here, we demonstrate high signal to noise quasiresonant excitation of InP/InGaP quantum dots. The excitation is provided via second harmonic generated from a telecommunications wavelength laser resonant with the fundamental mode of a photonic crystal cavity, fabricated at twice the quantum dot transition wavelength. The second harmonic is generated using the \chi(2) nonlinearity of the InGaP material matrix.
  • We demonstrate room temperature visible wavelength photoluminescence from In0.5Ga0.5As quantum dots embedded in a GaP membrane. Time-resolved above band photoluminescence measurements of quantum dot emission show a biexpontential decay with lifetimes of ~200 ps. We fabricate photonic crystal cavities which provide enhanced outcoupling of quantum dot emission, allowing the observation of narrow lines indicative of single quantum dot emission. This materials system is compatible with monolithic integration on Si, and is promising for high efficiency detection of single quantum dot emission as well as optoelectronic devices emitting at visible wavelengths.
  • We propose and experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal nanocavity with multiple resonances that can be tuned nearly independently. The design is composed of two orthogonal intersecting nanobeam cavities. Experimentally, we measure cavity quality factors of 6,600 and 1000 for resonances separated by 382 nm; we measure a maximum separation between resonances of 506 nm. These structures are promising for enhancing efficiency in nonlinear optical processes such as sum/difference frequency and stimulated Raman scattering.
  • We demonstrate enhanced second harmonic generation in a gallium phosphide photonic crystal waveguide with a measured external conversion efficiency of 5$\times10^{-7}$/W. Our results are promising for frequency conversion of on-chip integrated emitters having broad spectra or large inhomogeneous broadening, as well as for frequency conversion of ultrashort pulses.
  • We demonstrate a quantum dot single photon source at 900 nm triggered at 300 MHz by a continuous wave telecommunications wavelength laser followed by an electro-optic modulator. The quantum dot is excited by on-chip-generated second harmonic radiation, resonantly enhanced by a GaAs photonic crystal cavity surrounding the InAs quantum dot. Our result suggests a path toward the realization of telecommunications-wavelength-compatible quantum dot single photon sources with speeds exceeding 1 GHz.