• Our understanding of correlated electron systems is vexed by the complexity of their interactions. Heavy fermion compounds are archetypal examples of this physics, leading to exotic properties that weave together magnetism, superconductivity and strange metal behavior. The Kondo semimetal CeSb is an unusual example where different channels of interaction not only coexist, but their physical signatures are coincident, leading to decades of debate about the microscopic picture describing the interactions between the $f$ moments and the itinerant electron sea. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we resonantly enhance the response of the Ce$f$-electrons across the magnetic transitions of CeSb and find there are two distinct modes of interaction that are simultaneously active, but on different kinds of carriers. This study is a direct visualization of how correlated systems can reconcile the coexistence of different modes on interaction - by separating their action in momentum space, they allow their coexistence in real space.
  • We present the crystal structure, electronic structure, and transport properties of the material YbMnSb$_2$, a candidate system for the investigation of Dirac physics in the presence of magnetic order. Our measurements reveal that this system is a low-carrier-density semimetal with a 2D Fermi surface arising from a Dirac dispersion, consistent with the predictions of density functional theory calculations of the antiferromagnetic system. The low temperature resistivity is very large, suggesting scattering in this system is highly efficient at dissipating momentum despite its Dirac-like nature.
  • The temperature-dependent evolution of the Kondo lattice is a long-standing topic of theoretical and experimental investigation and yet it lacks a truly microscopic description of the relation of the basic $f$-$d$ hybridization processes to the fundamental temperature scales of Kondo screening and Fermi-liquid lattice coherence. Here, the temperature-dependence of $f$-$d$ hybridized band dispersions and Fermi-energy $f$ spectral weight in the Kondo lattice system CeCoIn$_5$ is investigated using $f$-resonant angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) with sufficient detail to allow direct comparison to first principles dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations containing full realism of crystalline electric field states. The ARPES results, for two orthogonal (001) and (100) cleaved surfaces and three different $f$-$d$ hybridization scenarios, with additional microscopic insight provided by DMFT, reveal $f$ participation in the Fermi surface at temperatures much higher than the lattice coherence temperature, $T^*\approx$ 45 K, commonly believed to be the onset for such behavior. The identification of a $T$-dependent crystalline electric field degeneracy crossover in the DMFT theory $below$ $T^*$ is specifically highlighted.
  • The neutron spin resonance is a collective magnetic excitation that appears in copper oxide, iron pnictide, and heavy fermion unconventional superconductors. Although the resonance is commonly associated with a spin-exciton due to the $d$($s^{\pm}$)-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter, it has also been proposed to be a magnon-like excitation appearing in the superconducting state. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to demonstrate that the resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce$_{1-x}$Yb$_{x}$CoIn$_5$ with $x=0,0.05,0.3$ has a ring-like upward dispersion that is robust against Yb-doping. By comparing our experimental data with random phase approximation calculation using the electronic structure and the momentum dependence of the $d_{x^2-y^2}$-wave superconducting gap determined from scanning tunneling microscopy for CeCoIn$_5$, we conclude the robust upward dispersing resonance mode in Ce$_{1-x}$Yb$_{x}$CoIn$_5$ is inconsistent with the downward dispersion predicted within the spin-exciton scenario.
  • The mixed valent compound SmB6 is of high current interest as the first candidate example of topologically protected surface states in a strongly correlated insulator and also as a possible host for an exotic bulk many-body state that would manifest properties of both an insulator and a metal. Two different de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) experiments have each supported one of these possibilities, while angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) for the (001) surface has supported the first, but without quantitative agreement to the dHvA results. We present new ARPES data for the (110) surface and a new analysis of all published dHvA data and thereby bring ARPES and dHvA into substantial consistency around the basic narrative of two dimensional surface states.