• Microscopic analysis of histological sections is considered the "gold standard" to verify structural parcellations in the human brain. Its high resolution allows the study of laminar and columnar patterns of cell distributions, which build an important basis for the simulation of cortical areas and networks. However, such cytoarchitectonic mapping is a semiautomatic, time consuming process that does not scale with high throughput imaging. We present an automatic approach for parcellating histological sections at 2um resolution. It is based on a convolutional neural network that combines topological information from probabilistic atlases with the texture features learned from high-resolution cell-body stained images. The model is applied to visual areas and trained on a sparse set of partial annotations. We show how predictions are transferable to new brains and spatially consistent across sections.
  • We describe a learning-based approach to blind image deconvolution. It uses a deep layered architecture, parts of which are borrowed from recent work on neural network learning, and parts of which incorporate computations that are specific to image deconvolution. The system is trained end-to-end on a set of artificially generated training examples, enabling competitive performance in blind deconvolution, both with respect to quality and runtime.
  • Kepler's immense photometric precision to date was maintained through satellite stability and precise pointing. In this white paper, we argue that image modeling--fitting the Kepler-downlinked raw pixel data--can vastly improve the precision of Kepler in pointing-degraded two-wheel mode. We argue that a non-trivial modeling effort may permit continuance of photometry at 10-ppm-level precision. We demonstrate some baby steps towards precise models in both data-driven (flexible) and physics-driven (interpretably parameterized) modes. We demonstrate that the expected drift or jitter in positions in the two-weel era will help with constraining calibration parameters. In particular, we show that we can infer the device flat-field at higher than pixel resolution; that is, we can infer pixel-to-pixel variations in intra-pixel sensitivity. These results are relevant to almost any scientific goal for the repurposed mission; image modeling ought to be a part of any two-wheel repurpose for the satellite. We make other recommendations for Kepler operations, but fundamentally advocate that the project stick with its core mission of finding and characterizing Earth analogs. [abridged]
  • In today's mailing, Hogg et al. propose image modeling techniques to maintain 10-ppm-level precision photometry in Kepler data with only two working reaction wheels. While these results are relevant to many scientific goals for the repurposed mission, all modeling efforts so far have used a toy model of the Kepler telescope. Because the two-wheel performance of Kepler remains to be determined, we advocate for the consideration of an alternate strategy for a >1 year program that maximizes the science return from the "low-torque" fields across the ecliptic plane. Assuming we can reach the precision of the original Kepler mission, we expect to detect 800 new planet candidates in the first year of such a mission. Our proposed strategy has benefits for transit timing variation and transit duration variation studies, especially when considered in concert with the future TESS mission. We also expect to help address the first key science goal of Kepler: the frequency of planets in the habitable zone as a function of spectral type.
  • We establish a link between Fourier optics and a recent construction from the machine learning community termed the kernel mean map. Using the Fraunhofer approximation, it identifies the kernel with the squared Fourier transform of the aperture. This allows us to use results about the invertibility of the kernel mean map to provide a statement about the invertibility of Fraunhofer diffraction, showing that imaging processes with arbitrarily small apertures can in principle be invertible, i.e., do not lose information, provided the objects to be imaged satisfy a generic condition. A real world experiment shows that we can super-resolve beyond the Rayleigh limit.
  • Image denoising can be described as the problem of mapping from a noisy image to a noise-free image. The best currently available denoising methods approximate this mapping with cleverly engineered algorithms. In this work we attempt to learn this mapping directly with plain multi layer perceptrons (MLP) applied to image patches. We will show that by training on large image databases we are able to outperform the current state-of-the-art image denoising methods. In addition, our method achieves results that are superior to one type of theoretical bound and goes a large way toward closing the gap with a second type of theoretical bound. Our approach is easily adapted to less extensively studied types of noise, such as mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise, JPEG artifacts, salt-and-pepper noise and noise resembling stripes, for which we achieve excellent results as well. We will show that combining a block-matching procedure with MLPs can further improve the results on certain images. In a second paper, we detail the training trade-offs and the inner mechanisms of our MLPs.
  • Image denoising can be described as the problem of mapping from a noisy image to a noise-free image. In another paper, we show that multi-layer perceptrons can achieve outstanding image denoising performance for various types of noise (additive white Gaussian noise, mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise, JPEG artifacts, salt-and-pepper noise and noise resembling stripes). In this work we discuss in detail which trade-offs have to be considered during the training procedure. We will show how to achieve good results and which pitfalls to avoid. By analysing the activation patterns of the hidden units we are able to make observations regarding the functioning principle of multi-layer perceptrons trained for image denoising.
  • GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) is a public image analysis challenge aimed at the development of algorithms to analyze astronomical images. Specifically, the challenge is to measure varying image distortions in the presence of a variable convolution kernel, pixelization and noise. This is the second in a series of challenges set to the astronomy, computer science and statistics communities, providing a structured environment in which methods can be improved and tested in preparation for planned astronomical surveys. GREAT10 extends upon previous work by introducing variable fields into the challenge. The "Galaxy Challenge" involves the precise measurement of galaxy shape distortions, quantified locally by two parameters called shear, in the presence of a known convolution kernel. Crucially, the convolution kernel and the simulated gravitational lensing shape distortion both now vary as a function of position within the images, as is the case for real data. In addition, we introduce the "Star Challenge" that concerns the reconstruction of a variable convolution kernel, similar to that in a typical astronomical observation. This document details the GREAT10 Challenge for potential participants. Continually updated information is also available from http://www.greatchallenges.info.
  • After building a classifier with modern tools of machine learning we typically have a black box at hand that is able to predict well for unseen data. Thus, we get an answer to the question what is the most likely label of a given unseen data point. However, most methods will provide no answer why the model predicted the particular label for a single instance and what features were most influential for that particular instance. The only method that is currently able to provide such explanations are decision trees. This paper proposes a procedure which (based on a set of assumptions) allows to explain the decisions of any classification method.
  • We present the results of the GREAT08 Challenge, a blind analysis challenge to infer weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from images. The primary goal was to stimulate new ideas by presenting the problem to researchers outside the shear measurement community. Six GREAT08 Team methods were presented at the launch of the Challenge and five additional groups submitted results during the 6 month competition. Participants analyzed 30 million simulated galaxies with a range in signal to noise ratio, point-spread function ellipticity, galaxy size, and galaxy type. The large quantity of simulations allowed shear measurement methods to be assessed at a level of accuracy suitable for currently planned future cosmic shear observations for the first time. Different methods perform well in different parts of simulation parameter space and come close to the target level of accuracy in several of these. A number of fresh ideas have emerged as a result of the Challenge including a re-examination of the process of combining information from different galaxies, which reduces the dependence on realistic galaxy modelling. The image simulations will become increasingly sophisticated in future GREAT challenges, meanwhile the GREAT08 simulations remain as a benchmark for additional developments in shear measurement algorithms.