• We present the first results from the Swift Ultraviolet Survey of the Magellanic Clouds (SUMaC), the highest resolution ultraviolet (UV) survey of the Magellanic Clouds yet completed. In this paper, we focus on the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). When combined with multi-wavelength optical and infrared observations, the three near-UV filters on the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope are conducive to measuring the shape of the dust extinction curve and the strength of the 2175\AA\ dust bump. We divide the SMC into UV-detected star-forming regions and large 200" (58~pc) pixels and then model the spectral energy distributions using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to constrain the ages, masses, and dust curve properties. We find that the majority of the SMC has a 2175\AA\ dust bump, which is larger to the northeast and smaller to the southwest, and that the extinction curve is universally steeper than the Galactic curve. We also derive a star formation history and find evidence for peaks in the star formation rate at 6-10 Myr, 30-80 Myr, and 400 Myr, the latter two of which are consistent with previous work.
  • We present multi-epoch X-ray spectral observations of three Type IIn supernovae (SNe) 2005kd, 2006jd, and 2010jl, acquired with Chandra, XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Swift. Previous extensive X-ray studies of SN 2010jl have revealed that X-ray spectra are dominated by thermal emission, which likely arises from a hot plasma heated by a forward shock propagating into a massive circumstellar medium (CSM). Interestingly, an additional soft X-ray component was required to reproduce the spectra at a period of ~1-2 yr after the SN explosion. Although this component is likely associated with the SN, its origin remained an open question. We find a similar, additional soft X-ray component from the other two SNe IIn as well. Given this finding, we present a new interpretation for the origin of this component; it is thermal emission from a forward shock essentially identical to the hard X-ray component, but directly reaches us from a void of the dense CSM. Namely, the hard and soft components are responsible for the heavily- and moderately-absorbed components, respectively. The co-existence of the two components with distinct absorptions as well as the delayed emergence of the moderately-absorbed X-ray component would be evidence for asphericity of the CSM. We show that the X-ray spectral evolution can be qualitatively explained by considering a torus-like geometry for the dense CSM. Based on our X-ray spectral analyses, we estimate the radius of the torus-like CSM to be on the order of ~5 times 10^{16} cm.
  • When measuring star formation rates using ultraviolet light, correcting for dust extinction is a critical step. However, with the variety of dust extinction curves to choose from, the extinction correction is quite uncertain. Here, we use Swift/UVOT to measure the extinction curve for star-forming regions in the SMC and M33. We find that both the slope of the curve and the strength of the 2175 Angstrom bump vary across both galaxies. In addition, as part of our modeling, we derive a detailed recent star formation history for each galaxy.
  • Only a handful of supernovae (SNe) have been studied in multi-wavelength from radio to X-rays, starting a few days after explosion. The early detection and classification of the nearby type IIb SN2011dh/PTF11eon in M51 provides a unique opportunity to conduct such observations. We present detailed data obtained at the youngest phase ever of a core-collapse supernova (days 3 to 12 after explosion) in the radio, millimeter and X-rays; when combined with optical data, this allows us to explore the early evolution of the SN blast wave and its surroundings. Our analysis shows that the expanding supernova shockwave does not exhibit equipartition (e_e/e_B ~ 1000), and is expanding into circumstellar material that is consistent with a density profile falling like R^-2. Within modeling uncertainties we find an average velocity of the fast parts of the ejecta of 15,000 +/- 1800 km/s, contrary to previous analysis. This velocity places SN 2011dh in an intermediate blast-wave regime between the previously defined compact and extended SN IIb subtypes. Our results highlight the importance of early (~ 1 day) high-frequency observations of future events. Moreover, we show the importance of combined radio/X-ray observations for determining the microphysics ratio e_e/e_B.
  • We report four years of radio and X-ray monitoring of the Type IIn supernova SN 2006jd at radio wavelengths with the Very Large Array, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array; at X-ray wavelengths with {\em Chandra}, {\em XMM-Newton} and {\em Swift}-XRT. We assume that the radio and X-ray emitting particles are produced by shock interaction with a dense circumstellar medium. The radio emission shows an initial rise that can be attributed to free-free absorption by cool gas mixed into the nonthermal emitting region; external free-free absorption is disfavored because of the shape of the rising light curves and the low gas column density inferred along the line of sight to the emission region. The X-ray luminosity implies a preshock circumstellar density $\sim 10^6$ cm$^{-3}$ at a radius $r\sim 2\times 10^{16}$ cm, but the column density inferred from the photoabsorption of X-rays along the line of sight suggests a significantly lower density. The implication may be an asymmetry in the interaction. The X-ray spectrum shows Fe line emission at 6.9 keV that is stronger than is expected for the conditions in the X-ray emitting gas. We suggest that cool gas mixed into the hot gas plays a role in the line emission. Our radio and X-ray data both suggest the density profile is flatter than $r^{-2}$ because of the slow evolution of the unabsorbed emission.
  • We have considered 53 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT). None of the SNe Ia are individually detected at any time or in stacked images. Using these data and assuming that the SNe Ia are a homogeneous class of objects, we have calculated upper limits to the X- ray luminosity (0.2 - 10 keV) and mass-loss rate of L0.2-10 < 1.7\times1038 erg s-1 and M \cdot < 1.1\times10-6 M\odot yr-1 \times(vw)/(10 km s-1), respectively. The results exclude massive or evolved stars as the companion objects in SNe Ia progenitor systems, but allow the possibility of main sequence or small stars, along with double degenerate systems consisting of two white dwarfs, consistent with results obtained at other wavelengths (e.g., UV, radio) in other studies.
  • We present the earliest ultraviolet (UV) observations of the bright Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe/PTF11kly in the nearby galaxy M101 at a distance of only 6.4 Mpc. It was discovered shortly after explosion by the Palomar Transient Factory and first observed by Swift/UVOT about a day after explosion. The early UV light is well-defined, with ~20 data points per filter in the five days after explosion. These early and well-sampled UV observations form new template light curves for comparison with observations of other SNe Ia at low and high redshift. We report fits from semi-empirical models of the explosion and find the time evolution of the early UV flux to be well fit by the superposition of two parabolic curves. Finally, we use the early UV flux measurements to examine a possible shock interaction with a non-degenerate companion. From models predicting the measurable shock emission, we find that even a solar mass companion at a distance of a few solar radii is unlikely at more than 95% confidence.
  • We present optical photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic observations of the Type II plateau supernova (SN) 2008in, which occurred in the outskirts of the nearly face-on spiral galaxy M 61. Photometric data in the X-rays, ultraviolet and near-infrared bands have been used to characterize this event. The SN field was imaged with the ROTSE-IIIb optical telescope about seven days before the explosion. This allowed us to constrain the epoch of the shock breakout to JD = 2454825.6. The duration of the plateau phase, as derived from the photometric monitoring, was ~ 98 days. The spectra of SN 2008in show a striking resemblance to those of the archetypal low-luminosity IIP SNe 1997D and 1999br. A comparison of ejecta kinematics of SN 2008in with the hydrodynamical simulations of Type IIP SNe by Dessart et al. (2010) indicates that it is a less energetic event (~ 5$\times10^{50}$ erg). However, the light curve indicates that the production of radioactive $^{56}$Ni is significantly higher than that in the low-luminosity SNe. Adopting an interstellar absorption along the SN direction of $A_V$ ~ 0.3 mag and a distance of 13.2 Mpc, we estimated a synthesized Ni mass of ~ 0.015 $M_{\odot}$. Employing semi-analytical formulae (Litvinova & Nadezhin 1985), we derived a pre-SN radius of ~ 126$R_{\odot}$, an explosion energy of ~ 5.4$\times10^{50}$ erg and a total ejected mass of ~ 16.7$M_{\odot}$. The latter indicates that the zero age main-sequence mass of the progenitor did not exceed 20$M_{\odot}$. Considering the above properties of SN 2008in, and its occurrence in a region of sub-solar metallicity ([O/H] ~ 8.44 dex), it is unlikely that fall-back of the ejecta onto a newly formed black hole occurred in SN 2008in. We therefore favor a low-energy explosion scenario of a relatively compact, moderate-mass progenitor star that generates a neutron star.
  • We present ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry of 26 Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) observed from March 2005 to March 2008 with the NASA {\it Swift} Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT). The dataset consists of 2133 individual observations, making it by far the most complete study of the UV emission from SNe~Ia to date. Grouping the SNe into three subclasses as derived from optical observations, we investigate the evolution of the colors of these SNe, finding a high degree of homogeneity within the normal subclass, but dramatic differences between that group and the subluminous and SN 2002cx-like groups. For the normal events, the redder UV filters on UVOT ($u$, $uvw1$) show more homogeneity than do the bluer UV filters ($uvm2$, $uvw2$). Searching for purely UV characteristics to determine existing optically based groupings, we find the peak width to be a poor discriminant, but we do see a variation in the time delay between peak emission and the late, flat phase of the light curves. The UV light curves peak a few days before the $B$ band for most subclasses (as was previously reported by Jha et al. 2006a), although the SN 2002cx-like objects peak at a very early epoch in the UV. That group also features the bluest emission observed among SNe~Ia. As the observational campaign is ongoing, we discuss the critical times to observe, as determined by this study, in order to maximize the scientific output of future observations.
  • We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby(redshift z = 0.004--0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way (MW) extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1_rc covering ~2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u ~3000--4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 ~2000-2400 A). The uvw1_rc-b colors show a scatter of ~0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2-uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, ~1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.
  • The merger of two white dwarfs (a.k.a. double degenerate merger) has often been cited as a potential progenitor of type Ia supernovae. Here we combine population synthesis, merger and explosion models with radiation-hydrodynamics light-curve models to study the implications of such a progenitor scenario on the observed type Ia supernova population. Our standard model, assuming double degenerate mergers do produce thermonuclear explosions, produces supernova light-curves that are broader than the observed type Ia sample. In addition, we discuss how the shock breakout and spectral features of these double degenerate progenitors will differ from the canonical bare Chandrasekhar-massed explosion models. We conclude with a discussion of how one might reconcile these differences with current observations.
  • Astronomers have proposed a number of mechanisms to produce supernova explosions. Although many of these mechanisms are now not considered primary engines behind supernovae, they do produce transients that will be observed by upcoming ground-based surveys and NASA satellites. Here we present the first radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the spectra and light curves from three of these "failed" supernovae: supernovae with considerable fallback, accretion induced collapse of white dwarfs, and energetic helium flashes (also known as type .Ia supernovae).
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of the X-ray light curves of SN 1993J in a nearby galaxy M81. This is the only supernova other than SN 1987A, which is so extensively followed in the X-ray bands. Here we report on SN 1993J observations with the {\it Chandra} in the year 2005 and 2008, and Swift observations in 2005, 2006 and 2008. We combined these observations with all available archival data of SN 1993J, which includes ROSAT, ASCA, {\it Chandra}, and XMM-{\it Newton} observations from 1993 April to 2006 August. In this paper we report the X-ray light curves of SN 1993J, extending up to fifteen years, in the soft (0.3--2.4 keV), hard (2--8 keV) and combined (0.3--8 keV) bands. The hard and soft-band fluxes decline at different rates initially, but after about 5 years they both undergo a $t^{-1}$ decline. The soft X-rays, which are initially low, start dominating after a few hundred days. We interpret that most of the emission below 8 keV is coming from the reverse shock which is radiative initially for around first 1000-2000 days and then turn into adiabatic shock. Our hydrodynamic simulation also confirms the reverse shock origin of the observed light curves. We also compare the H$\alpha$ line luminosity of SN 1993J with its X-ray light curve and note that the H$\alpha$ line luminosity has a fairly high fraction of the X-ray emission, indicating presence of clumps in the emitting plasma.
  • A detailed study spanning approximately a year has been conducted on the Type Ib supernova 2007Y. Imaging was obtained from X-ray to radio wavelengths, and a comprehensive set of multi-band (w2m2w1u'g'r'i'UBVYJHKs) light curves and optical spectroscopy is presented. A virtually complete bolometric light curve is derived, from which we infer a (56)Ni-mass of 0.06 M_sun. The early spectrum strongly resembles SN 2005bf and exhibits high-velocity features of CaII and H_alpha; during late epochs the spectrum shows evidence of a ejecta-wind interaction. Nebular emission lines have similar widths and exhibit profiles that indicate a lack of major asymmetry in the ejecta. Late phase spectra are modeled with a non-LTE code, from which we find (56)Ni, O and total-ejecta masses (excluding He) to be 0.06, 0.2 and 0.42 M_sun, respectively, below 4,500 km/s. The (56)Ni mass confirms results obtained from the bolometric light curve. The oxygen abundance suggests the progenitor was most likely a ~3.3 M_sun He core star that evolved from a zero-age-main-sequence mass of 10-13 M_sun. The explosion energy is determined to be ~10^50 erg, and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor is constrained from X-ray and radio observations to be <~10^-6 M_sun/yr. SN 2007Y is among the least energetic normal Type Ib supernovae ever studied.
  • We present ultravioliet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift spacecraft. This is the largest sample of UV light curves from any single instrument and covers all major SN types and most subtypes. The UV light curves of SNe Ia are fairly homogenous while SNe Ib/c and IIP show more variety in their light curve shapes. The UV-optical colors clearly differentiate SNe Ia and IIP, particularly at early times. The color evolution of SNe IIP, however, makes their colors similar to SNe Ia at about 20 days after explosion. SNe Ib/c are shown to have varied UV-optical colors. The use of UV colors to help type SNe will be important for high redshift SNe discovered in optical observations. These data can be added to ground based optical and near infrared data to create bolometric light curves of individual objects and as checks on generic bolometric corrections used in the absence of UV data. This sample can also be compared with rest-frame UV observations of high redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.
  • We review recent UV observations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) with the Swift Ultra-violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) during its first two years. Rest-frame UV photometry is useful for differentiating SN types by exploiting the UV-optical spectral shape and more subtle UV features. This is useful for the real-time classification of local and high-redshift SNe using only photometry. Two remarkable SNe Ib/c were observed with UVOT -- SN2006jc was a UV bright SN Ib. Swift observations of GRB060218/SN2006aj began shortly after the explosion and show a UV-bright peak followed by a UV-faint SN bump. UV observations are also useful for constraining the temperature and ionization structure of SNe IIP. Rest-frame UV observations of all types are important for understanding the extinction, temperature, and bolometric luminosity of SNe and to interpret the observations of high redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.
  • We analyze the Type II Plateau supernovae (SN II-P) 2005cs and 2006bp with the non-LTE model atmosphere code CMFGEN. We fit 13 spectra in the first month for SN 2005cs and 18 for SN 2006bp. {\sl Swift} ultraviolet photometry and ground-based optical photometry calibrate each spectrum. Our analysis shows both objects were discovered less than 3 days after they exploded, making these the earliest SN II-P spectra ever studied. They reveal broad and very weak lines from highly-ionized fast ejecta with an extremely steep density profile. We identify He{\sc ii} 4686\AA emission in the SN 2006bp ejecta. Days later, the spectra resemble the prototypical Type II-P SN 1999em, which had a supergiant-like photospheric composition. Despite the association of SN 2005cs with possible X-ray emission, the emergent UV and optical light comes from the photosphere, not from circumstellar emission. We surmise that the very steep density fall-off we infer at early times may be a fossil of the combined actions of the shock wave passage and radiation driving at shock breakout. Based on tailored CMFGEN models, the direct-fitting technique and the Expanding Photosphere Method both yield distances and explosion times that agree within a few percent. We derive a distance to NGC 5194, the host of SN 2005cs, of 8.9$\pm$0.5 Mpc and 17.5$\pm$0.8 Mpc for SN 2006bp in NGC 3953. The luminosity of SN 2006bp is 1.5 times that of SN 1999em, and 6 times that of SN 2005cs. Reliable distances to Type II-P supernovae that do not depend on a small range in luminosity provide an independent route to the Hubble Constant and improved constraints on other cosmological parameters.
  • We report early photospheric-phase observations of the Type IIP Supernova (SN) 2005cs obtained by Swift's Ultraviolet-Optical and X-Ray Telescopes. Observations started within two days of discovery and continued regularly for three weeks. During this time the V-band magnitude remained essentially constant, while the UV was initially bright but steadily faded until below the brightness of an underlying UV-bright HII region. This UV decay is similar to SNe II observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer. UV grism spectra show the P-Cygni absorption of MgII 2798A, indicating a photospheric origin of the UV flux. Based on non-LTE model atmosphere calculations with the CMFGEN code, we associate the rapid evolution of the UV flux with the cooling of the ejecta, the peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED) shifting from ~700A on June 30th to ~1200A on July 5th. Furthermore, the corresponding recombination of the ejecta, e.g., the transition from FeIII to FeII, induces considerable strengthening of metal line-blanketing at and above the photosphere, blocking more effectively this fading UV flux. SN2005cs was not detected in X-rays, and the upper limit to the X-ray luminosity yields a limit to the mass loss rate of the progenitor of about 10^-5 solar masses per year. Overall, Swift presents a unique opportunity to capture the early and fast evolution of Type II SNe in the UV, providing additional constraints on the reddening, the SED shortward of 4000A, and the ionization state and temperature of the photon-decoupling regions.
  • We report on the discovery of X-ray emission from SN 1970G in M101, 35 years after its outburst, using deep X-ray imaging with the Chandra X-ray observatory. The Chandra ACIS spectrum shows that the emission is soft (<2 keV) and characteristic for the reverse shock region. The X-ray luminosity (1 x 10^37 ergs/s) is likely caused by the interaction of the supernova (SN) shock with dense circumstellar matter. If the material was deposited by the stellar wind from the progenitor, a mass-loss rate of (2.6+/-0.4) x 10^-5 M_sun/year is inferred. Utilizing the high-resolution Chandra ACIS data of SN 1970G and its environment, we reconstruct the X-ray lightcurve from previous ROSAT HRI, PSPC, and XMM-Newton EPIC observations, and find a best-fit linear rate of decline of L \propto t^-s with index s = 1.7+/-0.6 over a period of 12-35 years after the outburst. As the oldest SN detected in X-rays, SN 1970G allows, for the first time, direct observation of the transition from a SN to its supernova remnant (SNR) phase.
  • We present results from observations of SN 1979C with XMM-Newton in X-rays and in the UV, archival X-ray and HST data, and follow-up ground-based optical imaging. The XMM-Newton MOS spectrum shows two-temperature thermal plasma emission characteristics of both the forward (4.1 keV) and reverse shock (0.78 keV) with no intrinsic absorption. The long-term X-ray lightcurve of SN 1979C shows no sign of a decline over 16-23 yrs after its outburst. The high X-ray luminosity (8 x 10^38 ergs/s) is caused by the interaction of the shock with dense circumstellar matter, likely deposited by a strong stellar wind from the progenitor with a high mass-loss rate of 1.5 x 10^-4 M_sun/yr. The X-ray data support a strongly decelerated shock and show a mass-loss rate history which is consistent with a constant progenitor mass-loss rate and wind velocity over the past >16,000 yrs in the evolution of the progenitor. We find a CSM density profile of rho_CSM \propto r^-s with index s<1.7 and high CSM densities (>10^4 cm^-3) out to large radii from the site of the explosion (> 4 x 10^17 cm). Using XMM-Newton Optical Monitor data we further detect optical/UV emission from SN 1979C, with B, U, and UVW1-band lum. of 5,7, and 9 x 10^36 ergs/s. The young stellar cluster in the vicinity of the SN, as imaged by the HST and follow-up ground-based optical imaging, can only provide a fraction of the total observed flux, so that a significant contribution to the output likely arises from the strong interaction of SN 1979C with dense CSM.
  • We present two high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of supernova (SN) 1994I which show, for the first time, that the interaction of the blast wave from a Type Ic SN with its surrounding circumstellar material (CSM) can give rise to soft X-ray emission. Given a 0.3-2 keV band X-ray luminosity of L_x ~ 1 x 10^{37} ergs/s between six and seven years after the outburst of SN 1994I, and assuming the X-ray emission arises from the shock-heated CSM, we derive a pre-SN mass-loss rate of \dot{M} ~ 1 x 10^{-5} M_sun/yr (v_w/10 km/s). Combining the results with earlier ROSAT observations, we construct the X-ray lightcurve of SN 1994I. A best-fit X-ray rate of decline of L_x \propto t^{-s} with index s~1 and a CSM density profile of rho_csm \propto r^{-1.9\pm0.1} are inferred, consistent with what is expected for a constant mass-loss rate and constant wind velocity profile for the SN progenitor (rho_csm \propto r^{-2}).
  • X-Ray Supernovae (astro-ph/0202231)

    March 27, 2002 astro-ph
    We present a review of X-ray observations of supernovae (SNe). By observing the (~0.1-100 keV) X-ray emission from young SNe, physical key parameters such as the circumstellar matter (CSM) density, mass-loss rate of the progenitor and temperature of the outgoing and reverse shock can be derived as a function of time. Despite intensive search over the last ~25 years, only 15 SNe have been detected in X-rays. We review the individual X-ray observations of these SNe and discuss their implications as to our understanding of the physical processes giving rise to the X-ray emission.
  • We report on the first detection of a pre-supernova (SN) evolution in the X-ray regime. The results are based on ROSAT observations of SN 1993J ranging from six days to five years after the outburst. The X-ray observations are used to probe the SN shell interaction with the ambient circumstellar matter (CSM). After exploring various scenarios that might explain the observed X-ray lightcurve with a t^-0.27 rate of decline, we present a coherent picture in terms of the interaction of the SN shock front with the CSM deposited by the progenitor's stellar wind. During the observed period, the SN shell has reached a radius of 3x10^17 cm from the site of the explosion, corresponding to ~10^4 years in the progenitors stellar wind history. Our analysis shows that the mass-loss rate of the progenitor has decreased constantly from \dot{M} = 4x10^-4 to 4x10^-5 M_sun/yr (v_w/10 km/s) during the late stage of the evolution. Assuming a spherically symmetric expansion, the circumstellar matter density profile is found to be significantly flatter (\rho_csm \propto r^-1.63) than expected for a constant mass-loss rate and constant wind velocity profile (r^-2). The observed evolution either reflects a decrease in the mass-loss rate, an increase in the wind speed or a combination of both, indicating that the progenitor likely was making a transition from the red to the blue supergiant phase during the late stage of its evolution.
  • We present a Chandra X-ray observation that shows, unambiguously for the first time, the presence of a giant diffuse X-ray-emitting corona around the edge-on disk galaxy NGC 4631. This corona, with a characteristic thermal temperature of 2-7\times10^6 K, extends as far as 8 kpc away from the galactic plane. The X-ray morphology resembles the radio halo of the galaxy, indicating a close connection between outflows of hot gas, cosmic rays, and magnetic field from the galactic disk. Enhanced diffuse X-ray emission is apparently enclosed by numerous H\alpha-emitting loops blistered out from the central disk of the galaxy, as is evident in a comparison with our deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging.
  • We present results from the analysis of deep ROSAT HRI and PSPC observations of the spiral galaxy M81. The inferred total (0.5-2 keV band) luminosity of M81 is ~3x10^40 ergs/s, excluding the contribution from identified interlopers found within the D_25 ellipse. The nucleus of the galaxy alone accounts for about 65% of this luminosity. The rest is due to 26 other X-ray sources (contributing ~10%) and to apparently diffuse emission, which is seen across much of the galactic disk and is particularly bright in the bulge region around the nucleus. Spectral analysis further gives evidence for a soft component, which can be characterized by a two-temperature optically thin plasma with temperature at ~0.15 keV and 0.60 keV and an absorption of the Galactic foreground only. These components, accounting for ~13% of the X-ray emission from the region, apparently arise in a combination of hot gas and faint discrete sources. We find interesting spatial coincidences of luminous (10^37-10^40 ergs/s) and variable X-ray sources with shock-heated optical nebulae. Three of them are previously classified as supernova remnant candidates. The other one is far off the main body of M81, but is apparently associated with a dense HI concentration produced most likely by the tidal interactions of the galaxy with its companions. These associations suggest that such optical nebulae may be powered by outflows from luminous X-ray binaries, which are comparable to, or more luminous than Galactic `micro-quasars'.