• In this work, we demonstrate a new way to perform classical multiparty computing amongst parties with limited computational resources. Our method harnesses quantum resources to increase the computational power of the individual parties. We show how a set of clients restricted to linear classical processing are able to jointly compute a non-linear multivariable function that lies beyond their individual capabilities. The clients are only allowed to perform classical XOR gates and single-qubit gates on quantum states. We also examine the type of security that can be achieved in this limited setting. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation using photonic qubits, that allows four clients to compute a specific example of a multiparty function, the pairwise AND.
  • Quantum interference of two independent particles in pure quantum states is fully described by the particles' distinguishability: the closer the particles are to being identical, the higher the degree of quantum interference. When more than two particles are involved, the situation becomes more complex and interference capability extends beyond pairwise distinguishability, taking on a surprisingly rich character. Here, we study many-particle interference using three photons. We show that the distinguishability between pairs of photons is not sufficient to fully describe the photons' behaviour in a scattering process, but that a collective phase, the triad phase, plays a role. We are able to explore the full parameter space of three-photon interference by generating heralded single photons and interfering them in a fibre tritter. Using multiple degrees of freedom - temporal delays and polarisation - we isolate three-photon interference from two-photon interference. Our experiment disproves the view that pairwise two-photon distinguishability uniquely determines the degree of non-classical many-particle interference.
  • Blind quantum computing allows for secure cloud networks of quasi-classical clients and a fully fledged quantum server. Recently, a new protocol has been proposed, which requires a client to perform only measurements. We demonstrate a proof-of-principle implementation of this measurement-only blind quantum computing, exploiting a photonic setup to generate four-qubit cluster states for computation and verification. Feasible technological requirements for the client and the device-independent blindness make this scheme very applicable for future secure quantum networks.
  • Vast developments in quantum technology have enabled the preparation of quantum states with more than a dozen entangled qubits. The full characterization of such systems demands distinct constructions depending on their specific type and the purpose of their use. Here we present a method that scales linearly with the number of qubits for characterizing stabilizer states. Our approach allows simultaneous extraction of information about the fidelity, the entanglement, and the nonlocality of the state and thus is of high practical relevance. We demonstrate the efficient applicability of our method by performing an experimental characterization of a photonic four-qubit cluster state and three- and four-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. Our scheme can be directly extended to larger-scale quantum information tasks.
  • A long-standing question is whether it is possible to delegate computational tasks securely. Recently, both a classical and a quantum solution to this problem were found. Here, we study the interplay of classical and quantum approaches and show how coherence can be used as a tool for secure delegated classical computation. We show that a client with limited computational capacity - restricted to an XOR gate - can perform universal classical computation by manipulating information carriers that may occupy superpositions of two states. Using single photonic qubits or coherent light, we experimentally implement secure delegated classical computations between an independent client and a server. The server has access to the light sources and measurement devices, whereas the client may use only a restricted set of passive optical devices to manipulate the light beams. Thus, our work highlights how minimal quantum and classical resources can be combined and exploited for classical computing.
  • Much of the anticipation accompanying the development of a quantum computer relates to its application to simulating dynamics of another quantum system of interest. Here we study the building blocks for simulating quantum spin systems with linear optics. We experimentally generate the eigenstates of the XY Hamiltonian under an external magnetic field. The implemented quantum circuit consists of two CNOT gates, which are realized experimentally by harnessing entanglement from a photon source and by applying a CPhase gate. We tune the ratio of coupling constants and magnetic field by changing local parameters. This implementation of the XY model using linear quantum optics might open the door to the future studies of quenching dynamics using linear optics.
  • In measurement-based quantum computing an algorithm is performed by measurements on highly-entangled resource states. To date, several implementations were demonstrated, all of them assuming perfect noise-free environments. Here we consider measurement-based information processing in the presence of noise and demonstrate quantum error detection. We implement the protocol using a four-qubit photonic cluster state, where we first encode a general qubit non-locally such that phase errors can be detected. We then read out the error syndrome and analyze the output states after decoding. Our demonstration shows a building block for measurement-based quantum computing which is crucial for realistic scenarios.
  • Quantum computers are expected to offer substantial speedups over their classical counterparts and to solve problems that are intractable for classical computers. Beyond such practical significance, the concept of quantum computation opens up new fundamental questions, among them the issue whether or not quantum computations can be certified by entities that are inherently unable to compute the results themselves. Here we present the first experimental verification of quantum computations. We show, in theory and in experiment, how a verifier with minimal quantum resources can test a significantly more powerful quantum computer. The new verification protocol introduced in this work utilizes the framework of blind quantum computing and is independent of the experimental quantum-computation platform used. In our scheme, the verifier is only required to generate single qubits and transmit them to the quantum computer. We experimentally demonstrate this protocol using four photonic qubits and show how the verifier can test the computer's ability to perform measurement-based quantum computations.
  • Quantum entanglement is widely recognized as one of the key resources for the advantages of quantum information processing, including universal quantum computation, reduction of communication complexity or secret key distribution. However, computational models have been discovered, which consume very little or no entanglement and still can efficiently solve certain problems thought to be classically intractable. The existence of these models suggests that separable or weakly entangled states could be extremely useful tools for quantum information processing as they are much easier to prepare and control even in dissipative environments. It has been proposed that a requirement for useful quantum states is the generation of so-called quantum discord, a measure of non-classical correlations that includes entanglement as a subset. Although a link between quantum discord and few quantum information tasks has been studied, its role in computation speed-up is still open and its operational interpretation remains restricted to only few somewhat contrived situations. Here we show that quantum discord is the optimal resource for the remote quantum state preparation, a variant of the quantum teleportation protocol. Using photonic quantum systems, we explicitly show that the geometric measure of quantum discord is related to the fidelity of this task, which provides an operational meaning. Moreover, we demonstrate that separable states with non-zero quantum discord can outperform entangled states. Therefore, the role of quantum discord might provide fundamental insights for resource-efficient quantum information processing.
  • Systems of linear equations are used to model a wide array of problems in all fields of science and engineering. Recently, it has been shown that quantum computers could solve linear systems exponentially faster than classical computers, making for one of the most promising applications of quantum computation. Here, we demonstrate this quantum algorithm by implementing various instances on a photonic quantum computing architecture. Our implementation involves the application of two consecutive entangling gates on the same pair of polarisation-encoded qubits. We realize two separate controlled-NOT gates where the successful operation of the first gate is heralded by a measurement of two ancillary photons. Our work thus demonstrates the implementation of a quantum algorithm with high practical significance as well as an important technological advance which brings us closer to a comprehensive control of photonic quantum information.
  • Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to provide the possibility of preserving the privacy of a computation. Here we show the first such experimental demonstration of blind quantum computation where the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. We demonstrate various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover algorithms. Remarkably, the client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for future unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.
  • Entangled photons are a crucial resource for quantum communication and linear optical quantum computation. Unfortunately, the applicability of many photon-based schemes is limited due to the stochastic character of the photon sources. Therefore, a worldwide effort has focused in overcoming the limitation of probabilistic emission by generating two-photon entangled states conditioned on the detection of auxiliary photons. Here we present the first heralded generation of photon states that are maximally entangled in polarization with linear optics and standard photon detection from spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We utilize the down-conversion state corresponding to the generation of three photon pairs, where the coincident detection of four auxiliary photons unambiguously heralds the successful preparation of the entangled state. This controlled generation of entangled photon states is a significant step towards the applicability of a linear optics quantum network, in particular for entanglement swapping, quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography and scalable approaches towards photonics-based quantum computing.