• Tensions between cosmic microwave background observations and the growth of the large-scale structure inferred from late-time probes pose a serious challenge to the concordance $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. State-of-the-art data from the Planck satellite predicts a higher rate of structure growth than what preferred by low-redshift observables. Such tension has hitherto eluded conclusive explanations in terms of straightforward modifications to $\Lambda$CDM, e.g. the inclusion of massive neutrinos or a dynamical dark energy component. Here, we investigate models of 'quartessence' -- a single dark component mimicking both dark matter and dark energy -- whose non-vanishing sound speed inhibits structure growth at late times on scales smaller than its corresponding Jeans' length. In principle, this could reconcile high- and low-redshift observations. We put this hypothesis to test against temperature and polarisation spectra from the latest Planck release, SDSS DR12 measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift-space distortions, and cosmic shear correlation functions from KiDS. This the first time that any specific model of quartessence is applied to actual data. We show that, if we naively apply $\Lambda$CDM nonlinear prescription to quartessence, the combined data sets allow for tight constraints on the model parameters. Apparently, quartessence alleviates the tension between the total matter fraction and late-time structure clustering, although in fact the tension is transferred from the latter to the quartessence sound speed parameter. However, we found that this strongly depends upon information from nonlinear scales. Indeed, if we relax this assumption, quartessence models appear still viable. For this reason, we argue that the nonlinear behaviour of quartessence deserves further investigation and may lead to a deeper understanding of the physics of the dark Universe.
  • The angular power spectrum is a gauge-independent observable that is in principle the natural tool for analysing spectroscopic galaxy number counts. In practice, the problem is that the computational requirements for next-generation surveys such as Euclid and the Square Kilometre Array are currently unfeasible. We propose a new method to save computational time for spectroscopic angular power spectra. This hybrid method is modelled on the Fourier power spectrum approach of treating relatively thick redshift bins (redshift width ~0.1) as separate surveys. In the hybrid method, each thick bin is further subdivided into thin bins (redshift width ~0.01); all the correlations within each thick bin are computed, while cross-bin correlations beyond the thick bins are neglected. Constraints on cosmological parameters from the hybrid method are comparable to those from the standard power spectrum analysis - but they have the advantage that cosmic evolution, wide-angle and lensing effects are naturally included, while no Alcock-Paczynski correction is needed. The hybrid method delivers much tighter constraints than a 2D tomographic approach that is typical for photometric surveys, which considers only thick bins and the correlations between them. Furthermore, for standard cosmological parameters our method is not biased by neglecting the effects of lensing on number counts.
  • We discuss the ground-breaking science that will be possible with a wide area survey, using the MeerKAT telescope, known as MeerKLASS (MeerKAT Large Area Synoptic Survey). The current specifications of MeerKAT make it a great fit for science applications that require large survey speeds but not necessarily high angular resolutions. In particular, for cosmology, a large survey over $\sim 4,000 \, {\rm deg}^2$ for $\sim 4,000$ hours will potentially provide the first ever measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillations using the 21cm intensity mapping technique, with enough accuracy to impose constraints on the nature of dark energy. The combination with multi-wavelength data will give unique additional information, such as exquisite constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity using the multi-tracer technique, as well as a better handle on foregrounds and systematics. Such a wide survey with MeerKAT is also a great match for HI galaxy studies, providing unrivalled statistics in the pre-SKA era for galaxies resolved in the HI emission line beyond local structures at z > 0.01. It will also produce a large continuum galaxy sample down to a depth of about 5\,$\mu$Jy in L-band, which is quite unique over such large areas and will allow studies of the large-scale structure of the Universe out to high redshifts, complementing the galaxy HI survey to form a transformational multi-wavelength approach to study galaxy dynamics and evolution. Finally, the same survey will supply unique information for a range of other science applications, including a large statistical investigation of galaxy clusters as well as produce a rotation measure map across a huge swathe of the sky. The MeerKLASS survey will be a crucial step on the road to using SKA1-MID for cosmological applications and other commensal surveys, as described in the top priority SKA key science projects (abridged).
  • We measure the cross-correlation between Fermi-LAT gamma-ray photons and over 1000 deg$^2$ of weak lensing data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), and the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). We present the first measurement of tomographic weak lensing cross-correlations and the first application of spectral binning to cross-correlations between gamma rays and weak lensing. The measurements are performed using an angular power spectrum estimator while the covariance is estimated using an analytical prescription. We verify the accuracy of our covariance estimate by comparing it to two internal covariance estimators. Based on the non-detection of a cross-correlation signal, we derive constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. We compute exclusion limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section $\langle\sigma_\rm{ann} v \rangle$, decay rate $\Gamma_\rm{dec}$, and particle mass $m_\rm{DM}$. We find that in the absence of a cross-correlation signal, tomography does not significantly improve the constraining power of the analysis. Assuming a strong contribution to the gamma-ray flux due to small-scale clustering of dark matter and accounting for known astrophysical sources of gamma rays, we exclude the thermal relic cross-section for particle masses of $m_\rm{DM}\lesssim 20$ GeV.
  • We report the detection of a cross-correlation signal between {\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope diffuse gamma-ray maps and catalogs of clusters. In our analysis, we considered three different catalogs: WHL12, redMaPPer and PlanckSZ. They all show a positive correlation with different amplitudes, related to the average mass of the objects in each catalog, which also sets the catalog bias. The signal detection is confirmed by the results of a stacking analysis. The cross-correlation signal extends to rather large angular scales, around 1 degree, that correspond, at the typical redshift of the clusters in these catalogs, to a few to tens of Mpc, i.e. the typical scale-length of the large scale structures in the Universe. Most likely this signal is contributed by the cumulative emission from AGNs associated to the filamentary structures that converge toward the high peaks of the matter density field in which galaxy clusters reside. In addition, our analysis reveals the presence of a second component, more compact in size and compatible with a point-like emission from within individual clusters. At present, we cannot distinguish between the two most likely interpretations for such a signal, i.e. whether it is produced by AGNs inside clusters or if it is a diffuse gamma-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium. We argue that this latter, intriguing, hypothesis might be tested by applying this technique to a low redshift large mass cluster sample.
  • Weak lensing has become an increasingly important tool in cosmology and the use of galaxy shapes to measure cosmic shear has become routine. The weak-lensing distortion tensor contains two other effects in addition to the two components of shear: the convergence and rotation. The rotation mode is not measurable using the standard cosmic shear estimators based on galaxy shapes, as there is no information on the original shapes of the images before they were lensed. Due to this, no estimator has been proposed for the rotation mode in cosmological weak-lensing surveys, and the rotation mode has never been constrained. Here, we derive an estimator for this quantity, which is based on the use of radio polarisation measurements of the intrinsic position angles of galaxies. The rotation mode can be sourced by physics beyond $\Lambda$CDM, and also offers the chance to perform consistency checks of $\Lambda$CDM and of weak-lensing surveys themselves. We present simulations of this estimator and show that, for the pedagogical example of cosmic string spectra, this estimator could detect a signal that is consistent with the constraints from Planck. We examine the connection between the rotation mode and the shear $B$-modes and thus how this estimator could help control systematics in future radio weak-lensing surveys.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will produce spectroscopic surveys of tens to hundreds of millions of HI galaxies, eventually covering 30,000 sq. deg. and reaching out to redshift z~2. The huge volumes probed by the SKA will allow for some of the best constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity, based on measurements of the large-scale power spectrum. We investigate various observational set-ups for HI galaxy redshift surveys, compatible with the SKA Phase 1 and Phase 2 (full SKA) configurations. We use the corresponding number counts and bias for each survey from realistic simulations and derive the magnification bias and the evolution of source counts directly from these. For the first time, we produce forecasts that fully include the general relativistic effects on the galaxy number counts. These corrections to the standard analysis become important on very large scales, where the signal of primordial non-Gaussianity grows strongest. Our results show that, for the full survey, the non-Gaussianity parameter fNL can be constrained down to an accuracy of 1.54. This improves the current limit set by the Planck satellite by a factor of five, using a completely different approach.
  • In this third paper of a series on radio weak lensing for cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array, we scrutinise synergies between cosmic shear measurements in the radio and optical/near-IR bands for mitigating systematic effects. We focus on three main classes of systematics: (i) experimental systematic errors in the observed shear; (ii) signal contamination by intrinsic alignments; and (iii) systematic effects due to an incorrect modelling of non-linear scales. First, we show that a comprehensive, multi-wavelength analysis provides a self-calibration method for experimental systematic effects, only implying <50% increment on the errors on cosmological parameters. We also illustrate how the cross-correlation between radio and optical/near-IR surveys alone is able to remove residual systematics with variance as large as 0.00001, i.e. the same order of magnitude of the cosmological signal. This also opens the possibility of using such a cross-correlation as a means to detect unknown experimental systematics. Secondly, we demonstrate that, thanks to polarisation information, radio weak lensing surveys will be able to mitigate contamination by intrinsic alignments, in a way similar but fully complementary to available self-calibration methods based on position-shear correlations. Lastly, we illustrate how radio weak lensing experiments, reaching higher redshifts than those accessible to optical surveys, will probe dark energy and the growth of cosmic structures in regimes less contaminated by non-linearities in the matter perturbations. For instance, the higher-redshift bins of radio catalogues peak at z~0.8-1, whereas their optical/near-IR counterparts are limited to z<0.5-0.7. This translates into having a cosmological signal 2 to 5 times less contaminated by non-linear perturbations.
  • We construct forecasts for cosmological parameter constraints from weak gravitational lensing surveys involving the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Considering matter content, dark energy and modified gravity parameters, we show that the first phase of the SKA (SKA1) can be competitive with other Stage III experiments such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and that the full SKA (SKA2) can potentially form tighter constraints than Stage IV optical weak lensing experiments, such as those that will be conducted with LSST, WFIRST-AFTA or Euclid-like facilities. Using weak lensing alone, going from SKA1 to SKA2 represents improvements by factors of $\sim10$ in matter, $\sim10$ in dark energy and $\sim5$ in modified gravity parameters. We also show, for the first time, the powerful result that comparably tight constraints (within $\sim5\%$) for both Stage III and Stage IV experiments, can be gained from cross-correlating shear maps between the optical and radio wavebands, a process which can also eliminate a number of potential sources of systematic errors which can otherwise limit the utility of weak lensing cosmology.
  • We construct a pipeline for simulating weak lensing cosmology surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), taking as inputs telescope sensitivity curves; correlated source flux, size and redshift distributions; a simple ionospheric model; source redshift and ellipticity measurement errors. We then use this simulation pipeline to optimise a 2-year weak lensing survey performed with the first deployment of the SKA (SKA1). Our assessments are based on the total signal-to-noise of the recovered shear power spectra, a metric that we find to correlate very well with a standard dark energy figure of merit. We first consider the choice of frequency band, trading off increases in number counts at lower frequencies against poorer resolution; our analysis strongly prefers the higher frequency Band 2 (950-1760 MHz) channel of the SKA-MID telescope to the lower frequency Band 1 (350-1050 MHz). Best results would be obtained by allowing the centre of Band 2 to shift towards lower frequency, around 1.1 GHz. We then move on to consider survey size, finding that an area of 5,000 square degrees is optimal for most SKA1 instrumental configurations. Finally, we forecast the performance of a weak lensing survey with the second deployment of the SKA. The increased survey size (3$\pi$\,steradian) and sensitivity improves both the signal-to-noise and the dark energy metrics by two orders of magnitude.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Despite its continued observational successes, there is a persistent (and growing) interest in extending cosmology beyond the standard model, $\Lambda$CDM. This is motivated by a range of apparently serious theoretical issues, involving such questions as the cosmological constant problem, the particle nature of dark matter, the validity of general relativity on large scales, the existence of anomalies in the CMB and on small scales, and the predictivity and testability of the inflationary paradigm. In this paper, we summarize the current status of $\Lambda$CDM as a physical theory, and review investigations into possible alternatives along a number of different lines, with a particular focus on highlighting the most promising directions. While the fundamental problems are proving reluctant to yield, the study of alternative cosmologies has led to considerable progress, with much more to come if hopes about forthcoming high-precision observations and new theoretical ideas are fulfilled.
  • We recently proposed to cross-correlate the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background with the gravitational lensing signal of cosmic shear. This represents a novel and promising strategy to search for annihilating or decaying particle dark matter (DM) candidates. In the present work, we demonstrate the potential of a tomographic-spectral approach: measuring the cross-correlation in separate bins of redshift and energy significantly improves the sensitivity to a DM signal. Indeed, the technique proposed here takes advantage of the different scaling of the astrophysical and DM components with redshift and, simultaneously, of their different energy spectra and different angular extensions. The sensitivity to a particle DM signal is extremely promising even when the DM-induced emission is quite faint. We first quantify the prospects of detecting DM by cross-correlating the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) diffuse gamma-ray background with the cosmic shear expected from the Dark Energy Survey. Under the hypothesis of a significant subhalo boost, such a measurement can deliver a 5-sigma detection of DM, if the DM particle is lighter than 300 GeV and has a thermal annihilation rate. We then forecast the capability of the European Space Agency Euclid satellite (whose launch is planned for 2020), in combination with an hypothetical future gamma-ray detector with slightly improved specifications compared to current telescopes. We predict that the cross-correlation of their data will allow a measurement of the DM mass with an uncertainty of a factor of 1.5-2, even for moderate subhalo boosts, for DM masses up to few hundreds of GeV and thermal annihilation rates.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Next-generation cosmological surveys will probe ever larger volumes of the Universe, including the largest scales, near and beyond the horizon. On these scales, the galaxy power spectrum carries signatures of local primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) and horizon-scale general relativistic (GR) effects. However, cosmic variance limits the detection of horizon-scale effects. Combining different surveys via the multi-tracer method allows us to reduce the effect down cosmic variance. This method benefits from large bias differences between two tracers of the underlying dark matter distribution, which suggests a multi-wavelength combination of large volume surveys that are planned on a similar timescale. We show that the combination of two contemporaneous surveys, a large neutral hydrogen intensity mapping survey in SKA Phase1 and a Euclid-like photometric survey, will provide unprecedented constraints on PNG as well as detection of the GR effects. We forecast that the error on local PNG will break through the cosmic variance limit on cosmic microwave background surveys and achieve $\sigma(f_{NL})\simeq1.4-0.5$, depending on assumed priors, bias, and sky coverage. GR effects are more robust to changes in the assumed fiducial model, and we forecast that they can be detected with a signal-to-noise of about $14$.
  • Non-Gaussianity in the primordial fluctuations that seeded structure formation produces a signal in the galaxy power spectrum on very large scales. This signal contains vital information about the primordial Universe, but it is very challenging to extract, because of cosmic variance and large-scale systematics - especially after the Planck experiment has already ruled out a large amplitude for the signal. Cosmic variance and experimental systematics can be alleviated by the multi-tracer method. Here we address another systematic - introduced by not using the correct relativistic analysis of the power spectrum on very large scales. In order to reduce the errors on fNL, we need to include measurements on the largest possible scales. Failure to include the relativistic effects on these scales can introduce significant bias in the best-fit value of fNL from future galaxy surveys.
  • Future galaxy redshift surveys aim at probing the clustering of the cosmic large-scale structure with unprecedented accuracy, thus complementing cosmic microwave background experiments in the quest to deliver the most precise and accurate picture ever of our Universe. Analyses of such measurements are usually performed within the context of the so-called vanilla LCDM model - the six-parameter phenomenological model which, for instance, emerges from best fits against the recent data obtained by the Planck satellite. Here, we show that such an approach is prone to subtle systematics when the Gaussianity of primordial fluctuations is concerned. In particular, we demonstrate that, if we neglect even a tiny amount of primordial non-Gaussianity - fully consistent with current limits - we shall introduce spurious biases in the reconstruction of cosmological parameters. This is a serious issue that must be properly accounted for in view of accurate (as well as precise) cosmology.
  • We provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We first summarise the capabilities and timeline of the LSST and overview its science goals. We then discuss the science questions in common between the two projects, and how they can be best addressed by combining the data from both telescopes. We describe how weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering studies with LSST and SKA can provide improved constraints on the causes of the cosmological acceleration. We summarise the benefits to galaxy evolution studies of combining deep optical multi-band imaging with radio observations. Finally, we discuss the excellent match between one of the most unique features of the LSST, its temporal cadence in the optical waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA.
  • HI intensity mapping (IM) is a novel technique capable of mapping the large-scale structure of the Universe in three dimensions and delivering exquisite constraints on cosmology, by using HI as a biased tracer of the dark matter density field. This is achieved by measuring the intensity of the redshifted 21cm line over the sky in a range of redshifts without the requirement to resolve individual galaxies. In this chapter, we investigate the potential of SKA1 to deliver HI intensity maps over a broad range of frequencies and a substantial fraction of the sky. By pinning down the baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift space distortion features in the matter power spectrum -- thus determining the expansion and growth history of the Universe -- these surveys can provide powerful tests of dark energy models and modifications to General Relativity. They can also be used to probe physics on extremely large scales, where precise measurements of spatial curvature and primordial non-Gaussianity can be used to test inflation; on small scales, by measuring the sum of neutrino masses; and at high redshifts where non-standard evolution models can be probed. We discuss the impact of foregrounds as well as various instrumental and survey design parameters on the achievable constraints. In particular we analyse the feasibility of using the SKA1 autocorrelations to probe the large-scale signal.
  • The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) has the potential to produce galaxy redshift surveys which will be competitive with other state of the art cosmological experiments in the next decade. In this chapter we summarise what capabilities the first and the second phases of the SKA will be able to achieve in its current state of design. We summarise the different cosmological experiments which are outlined in further detail in other chapters of this Science Book. The SKA will be able to produce competitive Baryonic Oscillation (BAOs) measurements in both its phases. The first phase of the SKA will provide similar measurements as optical and IR experiments with completely different systematic effects whereas the second phase being transformational in terms of its statistical power. The SKA will produce very accurate Redshift Space Distortions (RSD) measurements, being superior to other experiments at lower redshifts, due to the large number of galaxies. Cross correlations of the galaxy redshift data from the SKA with radio continuum surveys and optical surveys will provide extremely good calibration of photometric redshifts as well as extremely good bounds on modifications of gravity. Basing on a Principle Component Analysis (PCA) approach, we find that the SKA will be able to provide competitive constraints on dark energy and modified gravity models. Due to the large area covered the SKA it will be a transformational experiment in measuring physics from the largest scales such as non-Gaussian signals from $\textrm{f}_{\textrm{nl}}$. Finally, the SKA might produce the first real time measurement of the redshift drift. The SKA will be a transformational machine for cosmology as it grows from an early Phase 1 to its full power.
  • The imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in large-scale structure can be used as a standard ruler for mapping out the cosmic expansion history, and hence for testing cosmological models. In this article we briefly describe the scientific background to the BAO technique, and forecast the potential of the Phase 1 and 2 SKA telescopes to perform BAO surveys using both galaxy catalogues and intensity mapping, assessing their competitiveness with current and future optical galaxy surveys. We find that a 25,000 sq. deg. intensity mapping survey on a Phase 1 array will preferentially constrain the radial BAO, providing a highly competitive 2% constraint on the expansion rate at z ~ 2. A 30,000 sq. deg. galaxy redshift survey on SKA2 will outperform all other planned experiments for z < 1.4.
  • Alterations of the gravity Lagrangian introduced in modified torsion gravity theories---also referred to as $f(T)$ gravity---allows for an accelerated expansion in a matter dominated Universe. In this framework, the cosmic speed up is driven by an effective `torsion fluid'. Besides the background evolution of the Universe, structure formation is also modified because of a time dependent effective gravitational constant. Here, we investigate the imprints of $f(T)$ gravity on galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing to the aim of understanding whether future galaxy surveys could constrain torsion gravity and discriminate amongst it and standard general relativity. Specifically, we compute Fisher matrix forecasts for two viable $f(T)$ models to both infer the accuracy on the measurement of the model parameters and evaluate the power that a combined clustering and shear analysis will have as a tool for model selection. We find that with such a combination of probes it will indeed be possible to tightly constrain $f(T)$ model parameters. Moreover, the Occam's razor provided by the Bayes factor will allow us to confirm an $f(T)$ power-law extension of the concordance $\Lambda{\rm CDM}$ model, were a value larger than 0.02 of its power-law slope measured, whereas in $\Lambda{\rm CDM}$ it is exactly 0.
  • In this paper we investigate magnetic fields generated in the early Universe. These fields are important candidates at explaining the origin of astrophysical magnetism observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters, whose genesis is still by and large unclear. Compared to the standard inflationary power spectrum, intermediate to small scales would experience further substantial matter clustering, were a cosmological magnetic field present prior to recombination. As a consequence, the bias and redshift distribution of galaxies would also be modified. Hitherto, primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) have been tested and constrained with a number of cosmological observables, e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation, galaxy clustering and, more recently, weak gravitational lensing. Here, we explore the constraining potential of the density fluctuation bias induced by gravitational lensing magnification onto the galaxy-galaxy angular power spectrum. Such an effect is known as magnification bias. Compared to the usual galaxy clustering approach, magnification bias helps in lifting the pathological degeneracy present amongst power spectrum normalisation and galaxy bias. This is because magnification bias cross-correlates galaxy number density fluctuations of nearby objects with weak lensing distortions of high-redshift sources. Thus, it takes advantage of the gravitational deflection of light, which is insensitive to galaxy bias but powerful in constraining the density fluctuation amplitude. To scrutinise the potentiality of this method, we adopt a deep and wide-field spectroscopic galaxy survey. We show that magnification bias does contain important information on primordial magnetism, which will be useful in combination with galaxy clustering and shear. We find we shall be able to rule out at 95.4% CL amplitudes of PMFs larger than 0.0005 nG for values of the PMF power spectral index ~0.
  • We explore the use of different radio galaxy populations as tracers of different mass halos and therefore, with different bias properties, to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type. We perform a Fisher matrix analysis based on the predicted auto and cross angular power spectra of these populations, using simulated redshift distributions as a function of detection flux and the evolution of the bias for the different galaxy types (Star forming galaxies, Starburst galaxies, Radio-Quiet Quasars, FRI and FRII AGN galaxies). We show that such a multi-tracer analysis greatly improves the information on non-Gaussianity by drastically reducing the cosmic variance contribution to the overall error budget. By using this method applied to future surveys, we predict a constraint of sigma_fnl=3.6 on the local non-Gaussian parameter for a galaxy detection flux limit of 10 \muJy and sigma_fnl=2.2 for 1 \muJy. We show that this significantly improves on the constraints obtained when using the whole undifferentiated populations (sigma_fnl=48 for 10 \muJy and sigma_fnl=12 for 1 \muJy). We conclude that continuum radio surveys alone have the potential to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity to an accuracy at least a factor of two better than the present constraints obtained with Planck data on the CMB bispectrum, opening a window to obtain sigma_fnl~1 with the Square Kilometer Array.
  • The large-scale structure of the Universe supplies crucial information about the physical processes at play at early times. Unresolved maps of the intensity of 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen HI at redshifts z~1-5 are the best hope of accessing the ultralarge-scale information, directly related to the early Universe. A purpose-built HI intensity experiment may be used to detect the large scale effects of primordial non-Gaussianity, placing stringent bounds on different models of inflation. We argue that it may be possible to place tight constraints on the non-Gaussianity parameter f_NL, with an error close to ~1.