• While Chandrasekhar-mass ($M_{\rm Ch}$) models with a low $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ yield can match the peak luminosities of fast-declining, 91bg-like Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), they systematically fail to reproduce their faster light-curve evolution. Here we illustrate the impact of a low ejecta mass on the radiative display of low-luminosity SNe Ia, by comparing a sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model resulting from the pure central detonation of a C-O White Dwarf (WD) to a $M_{\rm Ch}$ delayed-detonation model with the same $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ yield of 0.12 M$_{\odot}$. Our sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model from a 0.90 M$_{\odot}$ WD progenitor has a $\sim$5 day shorter rise time in the integrated UV-optical-IR (uvoir) luminosity, as well as in the $B$-band, and a $\sim$20 per cent higher peak uvoir luminosity ($\sim$1 mag brighter peak $M_B$). This sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model also displays bluer maximum-light colours due to the larger specific heating rate, and larger post-maximum uvoir and $B$-band decline rates. The luminosity decline at nebular times is also more pronounced, reflecting the enhanced escape of gamma rays resulting from the lower density of the progenitor WD. The deficit of stable nickel in the innermost ejecta leads to a notable absence of forbidden lines of [Ni II] in the nebular spectra. In contrast, the $M_{\rm Ch}$ model displays a strong line due to [Ni II] 1.939 $\mu\rm{m}$, which could in principle serve to distinguish between different progenitor scenarios. Our sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model offers an unprecedented agreement with optical and near-infrared observations of the 91bg-like SN 1999by, making a strong case for a WD progenitor significantly below the Chandrasekhar-mass limit for this event and other low-luminosity SNe Ia.
  • We present multiband photometry of 60 spectroscopically-confirmed supernovae (SN): 39 SN II/IIP, 19 IIn, one IIb and one that was originally classified as a IIn but later as a Ibn. Forty-six have only optical photometry, six have only near infrared (NIR) photometry and eight have both optical and NIR. The median redshift of the sample is 0.016. We also present 192 optical spectra for 47 of the 60 SN. All data are publicly available. There are 26 optical and two NIR light curves of SN II/IIP with redshifts z > 0.01, some of which may give rise to useful distances for cosmological applications. All photometry was obtained between 2000 and 2011 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO), via the 1.2m and 1.3m PAIRITEL telescopes for the optical and NIR, respectively. Each SN was observed in a subset of the $u'UBVRIr'i'JHK_s$ bands. There are a total of 2932 optical and 816 NIR light curve points. Optical spectra were obtained using the FLWO 1.5m Tillinghast telescope with the FAST spectrograph and the MMT Telescope with the Blue Channel Spectrograph. Our photometry is in reasonable agreement with other samples from the literature. Comparison with Pan-STARRS shows that two-thirds of our individual star sequences have weighted-mean V offsets within $\pm$0.02 mag. In comparing our standard-system SN light curves with common Carnegie Supernova Project objects using their color terms, we found that roughly three-quarters have average differences within $\pm$0.04 mag. The data from this work and the literature will provide insight into SN II explosions, help with developing methods for photometric SN classification, and contribute to their use as cosmological distance indicators.
  • The faster light-curve evolution of low-luminosity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) suggests that they could result from the explosion of white dwarf (WD) progenitors below the Chandrasekhar mass ($M_{\rm Ch}$). Here we present 1D non-LTE time-dependent radiative transfer simulations of pure central detonations of carbon-oxygen WDs with a mass ($M_\rm{tot}$) between 0.88 M$_{\odot}$ and 1.15 M$_{\odot}$, and a $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ yield between 0.08 M$_{\odot}$ and 0.84 M$_{\odot}$. Their lower ejecta density compared to $M_{\rm Ch}$ models results in a more rapid increase of the luminosity at early times and an enhanced $\gamma$-ray escape fraction past maximum light. Consequently, their bolometric light curves display shorter rise times and larger post-maximum decline rates. Moreover, the higher $M(^{56}\rm{Ni})/M_\rm{tot}$ ratio at a given $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ mass enhances the temperature and ionization level in the spectrum-formation region for the less luminous models, giving rise to bluer colours at maximum light and a faster post-maximum evolution of the $B-V$ colour. For sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ models fainter than $M_B\approx -18.5$ mag at peak, the greater bolometric decline and faster colour evolution lead to a larger $B$-band post-maximum decline rate, $\Delta M_{15}(B)$. In particular, all of our previously-published $M_{\rm Ch}$ models (standard and pulsational delayed detonations) are confined to $\Delta M_{15}(B) < 1.4$ mag, while the sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ models with $M_\rm{tot}\lesssim 1$ M$_{\odot}$ extend beyond this limit to $\Delta M_{15}(B)\approx 1.65$ mag for a peak $M_B\approx -17$ mag, in better agreement with the observed width-luminosity relation (WLR). Regardless of the precise ignition mechanism, these simulations suggest that fast-declining SNe Ia at the faint end of the WLR could result from the explosion of WDs whose mass is significantly below the Chandrasekhar limit.
  • The ESSENCE survey discovered 213 Type Ia supernovae at redshifts 0.1 < z < 0.81 between 2002 and 2008. We present their R and I-band photometry, measured from images obtained using the MOSAIC II camera at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope, along with rapid-response spectroscopy for each object. We use our spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine an accurate, quantitative classification and a precise redshift. Through an extensive calibration program we have improved the precision of the CTIO Blanco natural photometric system. We use several empirical metrics to measure our internal photometric consistency and our absolute calibration of the survey. We assess the effect of various potential sources of systematic bias on our measured fluxes, and we estimate that the dominant term in the systematic error budget from the photometric calibration on our absolute fluxes is ~1%.
  • We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations of a Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation model which synthesizes 0.51 Msun of 56Ni, and confront our results to the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2002bo over the first 100 days of its evolution. Assuming only homologous expansion, this same model reproduces the bolometric and multi-band light curves, the secondary near-infrared (NIR) maxima, and the optical and NIR spectra. The chemical stratification of our model qualitatively agrees with previous inferences by Stehle et al., but reveals significant quantitative differences for both iron-group and intermediate-mass elements. We show that +/-0.1 Msun (i.e., +/-20 per cent) variations in 56Ni mass have a modest impact on the bolometric and colour evolution of our model. One notable exception is the U-band, where a larger abundance of iron-group elements results in less opaque ejecta through ionization effects, our model with more 56Ni displaying a higher near-UV flux level. In the NIR range, such variations in 56Ni mass affect the timing of the secondary maxima but not their magnitude, in agreement with observational results. Moreover, the variation in the I, J, and K_s magnitudes is less than 0.1 mag within ~10 days from bolometric maximum, confirming the potential of NIR photometry of SNe Ia for cosmology. Overall, the delayed-detonation mechanism in single Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf progenitors seems well suited for SN 2002bo and similar SNe Ia displaying a broad Si II 6355 A line. Whatever multidimensional processes are at play during the explosion leading to these events, they must conspire to produce an ejecta comparable to our spherically-symmetric model.
  • We present 645 optical spectra of 73 supernovae (SNe) of Types IIb, Ib, Ic, and broad-lined Ic. All of these types are attributed to the core collapse of massive stars, with varying degrees of intact H and He envelopes before explosion. The SNe in our sample have a mean redshift <cz> = 4200 km/s. Most of these spectra were gathered at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) between 2004 and 2009. For 53 SNe, these are the first published spectra. The data coverage range from mere identification (1-3 spectra) for a few SNe to extensive series of observations (10-30 spectra) that trace the spectral evolution for others, with an average of 9 spectra per SN. For 44 SNe of the 73 SNe presented here, we have well-determined dates of maximum light to determine the phase of each spectrum. Our sample constitutes the most extensive spectral library of stripped-envelope SNe to date. We provide very early coverage (as early as 30 days before V-band max) for photospheric spectra, as well as late-time nebular coverage when the innermost regions of the SNe are visible (as late as 2 years after explosion, while for SN1993J, we have data as late as 11.6 years). This data set has homogeneous observations and reductions that allow us to study the spectroscopic diversity of these classes of stripped SNe and to compare these to SNe associated with gamma-ray bursts. We undertake these matters in follow-up papers.
  • We explore the physics of SN Ia light curves and spectra using the 1-D non-LTE time-dependent radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. Rather than adjusting ejecta properties to match observations, we select as input one "standard" 1-D Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model, and then explore the sensitivity of radiation and gas properties on radiative-transfer modeling assumptions. The correct computation of SN Ia radiation is not exclusively a solution to an "opacity problem", characterized by the treatment of a large number of lines. It is also key to treat important atomic processes consistently. Besides handling line blanketing in non-LTE, we show that including forbidden line transitions of metals is increasingly important for the temperature and ionization of the gas beyond maximum light. Non-thermal ionization and excitation are also critical since they affect the color evolution and the Delta-M15 of our model. While impacting little the bolometric luminosity, a more complete treatment of decay routes leads to enhanced line blanketing, e.g., associated with 48Ti in the U and B bands. Overall, we find that SN Ia radiation properties are influenced in a complicated way by the atomic data we employ, so that obtaining converged results is a challenge. We nonetheless obtain a good match to the golden standard type Ia SN 2005cf in the optical and near-IR, from 5 to 60d after explosion, suggesting that assuming spherical symmetry is not detrimental to SN Ia radiative-transfer modeling at these times. Multi-D effects no doubt matter, but they are perhaps less important than accurately treating non-LTE processes [abridged].
  • Observations of SN 2011fe at early times reveal an evolution analogous to a fireball model of constant color. In contrast, our unmixed delayed detonations of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs (DDC series) exhibit a faster brightening concomitant with a shift in color to the blue. In this paper, we study the origin of these discrepancies. We find that strong chemical mixing largely resolves the photometric mismatch at early times, but it leads to an enhanced line broadening that contrasts, for example, with the markedly narrow SiII6355A line of SN 2011fe. We also explore an alternative configuration with pulsational-delayed detonations (PDDEL model series). Because of the pulsation, PDDEL models retain more unburnt carbon, have little mass at high velocity, and have a much hotter outer ejecta after the explosion. The pulsation does not influence the inner ejecta, so PDDEL and DDC models exhibit similar radiative properties beyond maximum. However, at early times, PDDEL models show bluer optical colors and a higher luminosity, even for weak mixing. Their early-time radiation is derived primarily from the initial shock-deposited energy in the outer ejecta rather than radioactive decay heating. Furthermore, PDDEL models show short-lived CII lines, reminiscent of SN 2013dy. They typically exhibit lines that are weaker, narrower, and of near-constant width, reminiscent of SN 2011fe. In addition to multi-dimensional effects, varying configurations for such ``pulsations" offer a source of spectral diversity amongst SNe Ia. PDDEL and DDC models also provide one explanation for low- and high-velocity gradient SNe Ia.
  • The high metal content and fast expansion of supernova (SN) Ia ejecta lead to considerable line overlap in their optical spectra. Uncertainties in composition and ionization further complicate the process of line identification. In this paper, we focus on the 5900A emission feature seen in SN Ia spectra after bolometric maximum, a line which in the last two decades has been associated with [CoIII]5888A or NaID. Using non-LTE time-dependent radiative-transfer calculations based on Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation models, we find that NaID line emission is extremely weak at all post-maximum epochs. Instead, we predict the presence of [CoIII]5888A after maximum in all our SN Ia models, which cover a range from 0.12 to 0.87Msun of 56Ni. We also find that the [CoIII]5888A forbidden line is present within days of bolometric maximum, and strengthens steadily for weeks thereafter. Both predictions are confirmed by observations. Rather than trivial taxonomy, these findings confirm that it is necessary to include forbidden-line transitions in radiative-transfer simulations of SNe Ia, both to obtain the correct ejecta cooling rate and to match observed optical spectra.
  • The delayed-detonation explosion mechanism applied to a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf offers a very attractive model to explain the inferred characteristics of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The resulting ejecta are chemically stratified, have the same mass and roughly the same asymptotic kinetic energy, but exhibit a range in 56Ni mass. We investigate the contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic properties of a sequence of delayed-detonation models, characterized by 56Ni masses between 0.18 and 0.81 Msun. Starting at 1d after explosion, we perform the full non-LTE, time-dependent radiative transfer with the code CMFGEN, with an accurate treatment of line blanketing, and compare our results to SNe Ia at bolometric maximum. Despite the 1D treatment, our approach delivers an excellent agreement to observations. We recover the range of SN Ia luminosities, colours, and spectral characteristics from the near-UV to 1 micron, for standard as well as low-luminosity 91bg-like SNe Ia. Our models predict an increase in rise time to peak with increasing 56Ni mass, from ~15 to ~21d, yield peak bolometric luminosities that match Arnett's rule to within 10%, and reproduce the much smaller scatter in near-IR magnitudes compared to the optical. We reproduce the morphology of individual spectral features, the stiff dependence of the R(Si) spectroscopic ratio on 56Ni mass, and the onset of blanketing from TiII/ScII in low-luminosity SNe Ia with a 56Ni mass <0.3 Msun. We find that ionization effects, which often dominate over abundance variations, can produce high-velocity features in CaII lines, even in 1D. Distinguishing between different SN Ia explosion mechanisms is a considerable challenge but the results presented here provide additional support to the viability of the delayed-detonation model.
  • We present non-LTE time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations of pair-instability supernovae (PISNe) stemming from red-supergiant (RSG), blue-supergiant (BSG) and Wolf-Rayet (WR) star rotation-free progenitors born in the mass range 160-230Msun, at 10^-4 Zsun. Although subject to uncertainties in convection and stellar mass-loss rates, our initial conditions come from physically-consistent models that treat evolution from the main-sequence, the onset of the pair-production instability, and the explosion phase. With our set of input models characterized by large 56Ni and ejecta masses, and large kinetic energies, we recover qualitatively the Type II-Plateau, II-peculiar, and Ib/c light-curve morphologies, although they have larger peak bolometric luminosities (~10^9 to 10^10 Lsun) and a longer duration (~200d). We discuss the spectral properties for each model during the photospheric and nebular phases, including Balmer lines in II-P and II-pec at early times, the dominance of lines from intermediate-mass-elements (IMEs) near the bolometric maximum, and the strengthening of metal line blanketing thereafter. Having similar He-core properties, all models exhibit similar post-peak spectra that are strongly blanketed by FeII and FeI lines, characterized by red colors, and that arise from photospheres/ejecta with a temperature of <4000K. Combined with the modest line widths after bolometric peak, these properties contrast with those of known super-luminous SNe suggesting that PISNe are yet to be discovered. Being reddish, PISNe will be difficult to observe at high redshift except when they stem from RSG explosions, in which case they could be used as metallicity probes and distance indicators.
  • Much uncertainty surrounds the origin of super-luminous supernovae (SNe). Motivated by the discovery of the Type Ic SN2007bi, we study its proposed association with a pair-instability SN (PISN). We compute stellar-evolution models for primordial ~200Msun stars, simulating the implosion/explosion due to the pair-production instability, and use them as inputs for detailed non-LTE time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations that include non-local energy deposition and non-thermal processes. We retrieve the basic morphology of PISN light curves from red-supergiant, blue-supergiant, and Wolf-Rayet (WR) star progenitors. Although we confirm that a progenitor 100Msun helium core (PISN model He100) fits well the SN2007bi light curve, the low ratios of its kinetic energy and 56Ni mass to the ejecta mass, similar to standard core-collapse SNe, conspire to produce cool photospheres, red spectra subject to strong line blanketing, and narrow line profiles, all conflicting with SN2007bi observations. He-core models of increasing 56Ni-to-ejecta mass ratio have bluer spectra, but still too red to match SN2007bi, even for model He125 -- the effect of 56Ni heating is offset by the associated increase in blanketing. In contrast, the delayed injection of energy by a magnetar represents a more attractive alternative to reproduce the blue, weakly-blanketed, and broad-lined spectra of super-luminous SNe. The extra heat source is free of blanketing and is not explicitly tied to the ejecta. Experimenting with a ~9Msun WR-star progenitor, initially exploded to yield a ~1.6B SN Ib/c ejecta but later influenced by tunable magnetar-like radiation, we produce a diversity of blue spectral morphologies reminiscent of SN2007bi, the peculiar Type Ib SN2005bf, and super-luminous SN2005ap-like events.
  • [Abridged] We investigate the use of a wide variety of spectroscopic measurements to determine distances to low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia). We consider linear models for predicting distances to SN Ia using light-curve width and color parameters (determined using the SALT2 light-curve fitter) and a spectroscopic indicator, and evaluate the resulting Hubble diagram scatter using a cross-validation procedure. We confirm the ability of spectral flux ratios alone at maximum light to reduce the scatter of Hubble residuals by ~10% with respect to the standard combination of light-curve width and color. When used in combination with the SALT2 color parameter, the color-corrected flux ratio R^c(6420/5290) at maximum light leads to an even lower scatter, although the improvement has low statistical significance (<2 sigma) given the size of our sample (26 SN Ia). We highlight the importance of an accurate relative flux calibration and the failure of this method for highly-reddened objects. Comparison with synthetic spectra from 2D delayed-detonation explosion models shows that the correlation of R(6630/4400) with SN Ia absolute magnitudes can be largely attributed to intrinsic color variations and not to reddening by dust in the host galaxy. We consider flux ratios at other ages, as well as the use of pairs of flux ratios, revealing the presence of small-scale intrinsic spectroscopic variations in the iron-group dominated absorption features around ~4300 A and ~4800 A. The best flux ratio overall is the color-corrected R^c(4610/4260) at t=-2.5d from maximum light, which leads to ~30% lower scatter with respect to the standard combination of light-curve width and color. We examine other spectroscopic indicators related to line-profile morphology, but none appear to lead to a significant improvement over the standard light-curve width and color parameters.
  • We combine the CfA3 supernova Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. (2008) to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1+w=0.013 +0.066/-0.068 (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically-useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R_V=3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R_V=1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < Delta < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R_V=3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R_V=1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2 sigma, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.
  • - Constraining the cosmological parameters and understanding Dark Energy have tremendous implications for the nature of the Universe and its physical laws. - The pervasive limit of systematic uncertainties reached by cosmography based on Cepheids and Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) warrants a search for complementary approaches. - Type II SNe have been shown to offer such a path. Their distances can be well constrained by luminosity-based or geometric methods. Competing, complementary, and concerted efforts are underway, to explore and exploit those objects that are extremely well matched to next generation facilities. Spectroscopic follow-up will be enabled by space- based and 20-40 meter class telescopes. - Some systematic uncertainties of Type II SNe, such as reddening by dust and metallicity effects, are bound to be different from those of SNe Ia. Their stellar progenitors are known, promising better leverage on cosmic evolution. In addition, their rate - which closely tracks the ongoing star formation rate - is expected to rise significantly with look- back time, ensuring an adequate supply of distant examples. - These data will competitively constrain the dark energy equation of state, allow the determination of the Hubble constant to 5%, and promote our understanding of the processes involved in the last dramatic phases of massive stellar evolution.
  • We have obtained 1087 NIR (JHKs) measurements of 21 SNe Ia using PAIRITEL, nearly doubling the number of well-sampled NIR SN Ia light curves. These data strengthen the evidence that SNe Ia are excellent standard candles in the NIR, even without correction for optical light-curve shape. We construct fiducial NIR templates for normal SNe Ia from our sample, excluding only the three known peculiar SNe Ia: SN 2005bl, SN 2005hk, and SN 2005ke. The H-band absolute magnitudes in this sample of 18 SNe Ia have an intrinsic rms of only 0.15 mag with no correction for light-curve shape. We found a relationship between the H-band extinction and optical color excess of AH=0.2E(B-V). This variation is as small as the scatter in distance modulus measurements currently used for cosmology based on optical light curves after corrections for light-curve shape. Combining the homogeneous PAIRITEL measurements with 23 SNe Ia from the literature, these 41 SNe Ia have standard H-band magnitudes with an rms scatter of 0.16 mag. The good match of our sample with the literature sample suggests there are few systematic problems with the photometry. We present a nearby NIR Hubble diagram that shows no correlation of the residuals from the Hubble line with light-curve properties. Future samples that account for optical and NIR light-curve shapes, absorption, spectroscopic variation, or host-galaxy properties may reveal effective ways to improve the use of SNe Ia as distance indicators. Since systematic errors due to dust absorption in optical bands remain the leading difficulty in the cosmological use of supernovae, the good behavior of SN Ia NIR light curves and their relative insensitivity to reddening make these objects attractive candidates for future cosmological work.
  • We analyze the Type II Plateau supernovae (SN II-P) 2005cs and 2006bp with the non-LTE model atmosphere code CMFGEN. We fit 13 spectra in the first month for SN 2005cs and 18 for SN 2006bp. {\sl Swift} ultraviolet photometry and ground-based optical photometry calibrate each spectrum. Our analysis shows both objects were discovered less than 3 days after they exploded, making these the earliest SN II-P spectra ever studied. They reveal broad and very weak lines from highly-ionized fast ejecta with an extremely steep density profile. We identify He{\sc ii} 4686\AA emission in the SN 2006bp ejecta. Days later, the spectra resemble the prototypical Type II-P SN 1999em, which had a supergiant-like photospheric composition. Despite the association of SN 2005cs with possible X-ray emission, the emergent UV and optical light comes from the photosphere, not from circumstellar emission. We surmise that the very steep density fall-off we infer at early times may be a fossil of the combined actions of the shock wave passage and radiation driving at shock breakout. Based on tailored CMFGEN models, the direct-fitting technique and the Expanding Photosphere Method both yield distances and explosion times that agree within a few percent. We derive a distance to NGC 5194, the host of SN 2005cs, of 8.9$\pm$0.5 Mpc and 17.5$\pm$0.8 Mpc for SN 2006bp in NGC 3953. The luminosity of SN 2006bp is 1.5 times that of SN 1999em, and 6 times that of SN 2005cs. Reliable distances to Type II-P supernovae that do not depend on a small range in luminosity provide an independent route to the Hubble Constant and improved constraints on other cosmological parameters.
  • We present an algorithm to identify the type of an SN spectrum and to determine its redshift and age. This algorithm, based on the correlation techniques of Tonry & Davis, is implemented in the Supernova Identification (SNID) code. It is used by members of ongoing high-redshift SN searches to distinguish between type Ia and type Ib/c SNe, and to identify "peculiar" SNe Ia. We develop a diagnostic to quantify the quality of a correlation between the input and template spectra, which enables a formal evaluation of the associated redshift error. Furthermore, by comparing the correlation redshifts obtained using SNID with those determined from narrow lines in the SN host galaxy spectrum, we show that accurate redshifts (with a typical error less than 0.01) can be determined for SNe Ia without a spectrum of the host galaxy. Last, the age of an input spectrum is determined with a typical 3-day accuracy, shown here by using high-redshift SNe Ia with well-sampled light curves. The success of the correlation technique confirms the similarity of some SNe Ia at low and high redshifts. The SNID code, which is available to the community, can also be used for comparative studies of SN spectra, as well as comparisons between data and models.
  • Motivated by the recognition that variation in the optical transmission of the atmosphere is probably the main limitation to the precision of ground-based CCD measurements of celestial fluxes, we review the physical processes that attenuate the passage of light through the Earth's atmosphere. The next generation of astronomical surveys, such as PanSTARRS and LSST, will greatly benefit from dedicated apparatus to obtain atmospheric transmission data that can be associated with each survey image. We review and compare various approaches to this measurement problem, including photometry, spectroscopy, and LIDAR. In conjunction with careful measurements of instrumental throughput, atmospheric transmission measurements should allow next-generation imaging surveys to produce photometry of unprecedented precision. Our primary concerns are the real-time determination of aerosol scattering and absorption by water along the line of sight, both of which can vary over the course of a night's observations.
  • We report early photospheric-phase observations of the Type IIP Supernova (SN) 2005cs obtained by Swift's Ultraviolet-Optical and X-Ray Telescopes. Observations started within two days of discovery and continued regularly for three weeks. During this time the V-band magnitude remained essentially constant, while the UV was initially bright but steadily faded until below the brightness of an underlying UV-bright HII region. This UV decay is similar to SNe II observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer. UV grism spectra show the P-Cygni absorption of MgII 2798A, indicating a photospheric origin of the UV flux. Based on non-LTE model atmosphere calculations with the CMFGEN code, we associate the rapid evolution of the UV flux with the cooling of the ejecta, the peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED) shifting from ~700A on June 30th to ~1200A on July 5th. Furthermore, the corresponding recombination of the ejecta, e.g., the transition from FeIII to FeII, induces considerable strengthening of metal line-blanketing at and above the photosphere, blocking more effectively this fading UV flux. SN2005cs was not detected in X-rays, and the upper limit to the X-ray luminosity yields a limit to the mass loss rate of the progenitor of about 10^-5 solar masses per year. Overall, Swift presents a unique opportunity to capture the early and fast evolution of Type II SNe in the UV, providing additional constraints on the reddening, the SED shortward of 4000A, and the ionization state and temperature of the photon-decoupling regions.
  • We present an algorithm to identify the types of supernova spectra, and determine their redshift and phase. This algorithm, based on the correlation techniques of Tonry & Davis, is implemented in the SuperNova IDentification code (SNID). It is used by members of the ESSENCE project to determine whether a noisy spectrum of a high-redshift supernova is indeed of type Ia, as opposed to, e.g., type Ib/c. Furthermore, by comparing the correlation redshifts obtained using SNID with those determined from narrow lines in the supernova host galaxy spectrum, we show that accurate redshifts (with a typical error < 0.01) can be determined for SNe Ia for which a spectrum of the host galaxy is unavailable. Last, the phase of an input spectrum is determined with a typical accuracy of ~3 days.
  • We present a set of 11 type Ia supernova (SN Ia) lightcurves with dense, pre-maximum sampling. These supernovae (SNe), in galaxies behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), were discovered by the SuperMACHO survey. The SNe span a redshift range of z = 0.11 - 0.35. Our lightcurves contain some of the earliest pre-maximum observations of SNe Ia to date. We also give a functional model that describes the SN Ia lightcurve shape (in our VR-band). Our function uses the "expanding fireball" model of Goldhaber et al. (1998) to describe the rising lightcurve immediately after explosion but constrains it to smoothly join the remainder of the lightcurve. We fit this model to a composite observed VR-band lightcurve of three SNe between redshifts of 0.135 to 0.165. These SNe have not been K-corrected or adjusted to account for reddening. In this redshift range, the observed VR-band most closely matches the rest frame V-band. Using the best fit to our functional description of the lightcurve, we find the time between explosion and observed VR-band maximum to be 17.6+-1.3(stat)+-0.07(sys) rest-frame days for a SN Ia with a VR-band Delta m_{-10} of 0.52mag. For the redshifts sampled, the observed VR-band time-of-maximum brightness should be the same as the rest-frame V-band maximum to within 1.1 rest-frame days.
  • The proper usage of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators has revolutionized cosmology, and added a new dominant component to the energy density of the Universe, dark energy. Following the discovery and confirmation era, the currently ongoing SNe Ia surveys aim to determine the properties of the dark energy. ESSENCE is a five year ground-based supernova survey aimed at finding and characterizing 200 SNe Ia in the redshift domain z=[0.2-0.8]. The goal of the project is to put constraints on the equation of state parameter, w, of the dark energy with an accuracy of <10%. This paper presents these ongoing efforts in the context of the current developments in observational cosmology.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of 23 high redshift supernovae spanning a range of z=0.34-1.03, 9 of which are unambiguously classified as Type Ia. These supernovae were discovered during the IfA Deep Survey, which began in September 2001 and observed a total of 2.5 square degrees to a depth of approximately m=25-26 in RIZ over 9-17 visits, typically every 1-3 weeks for nearly 5 months, with additional observations continuing until April 2002. We give a brief description of the survey motivations, observational strategy, and reduction process. This sample of 23 high-redshift supernovae includes 15 at z>0.7, doubling the published number of objects at these redshifts, and indicates that the evidence for acceleration of the universe is not due to a systematic effect proportional to redshift. In combination with the recent compilation of Tonry et al. (2003), we calculate cosmological parameter density contours which are consistent with the flat universe indicated by the CMB (Spergel et al. 2003). Adopting the constraint that Omega_total = 1.0, we obtain best-fit values of (Omega_m, Omega_Lambda)=(0.33, 0.67) using 22 SNe from this survey augmented by the literature compilation. We show that using the empty-beam model for gravitational lensing does not eliminate the need for Omega_Lambda > 0. Experience from this survey indicates great potential for similar large-scale surveys while also revealing the limitations of performing surveys for z>1 SNe from the ground.