• We present results of a ground-based near-infrared campaign with Palomar TripleSpec, Keck NIRSPEC, and Gemini GNIRS to target two samples of reddened active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates from the 31 deg$^2$ Stripe 82 X-ray survey. One sample, which is $\sim$89\% complete to $K<16$ (Vega), consists of eight confirmed AGNs, four of which were identified with our follow-up program, and is selected to have red $R-K$ colors ($>4$, Vega). The fainter sample ($K>17$, Vega) represents a pilot program to follow-up four sources from a parent sample of 34 that are not detected in the single-epoch SDSS catalog and have {\it WISE} quasar colors. All twelve sources are broad-line AGNs (at least one permitted emission line has a FWHM exceeding 1300 km s$^{-1}$) and span a redshift range $0.59 < z < 2.5$. Half the ($R-K$)-selected AGNs have features in their spectra suggestive of outflows. When comparing these sources to a matched sample of blue Type 1 AGNs, we find the reddened AGNs are more distant ($z > 0.5$) and a greater percentage have high X-ray luminosities ($L_{\rm X,full} > 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$). Such outflows and high luminosities may be consistent with the paradigm that reddened broad-line AGNs represent a transitory phase in AGN evolution as described by the major merger model for black hole growth. Results from our pilot program demonstrate proof-of-concept that our selection technique is successful in discovering reddened quasars at $z > 1$ missed by optical surveys.
  • Mrk 1018 is a "changing-look" AGN whose optical spectrum transitioned from a Type 1.9 to Type 1 between 1979 and 1984 and back to a Type 1.9 in 2015. This latest transition was accompanied by a decrease in X-ray flux. We analyze the Chandra spectra from 2010 and 2016 and NuSTAR spectra from 2016, carefully treating pile-up in the Chandra spectrum from 2010 and self-consistently modeling absorption, reflection, and Fe K$\alpha$ line emission in the X-ray spectra from 2016. We demonstrate that while the 2-10 keV X-ray flux decreased by an order of magnitude (1.46$^{+0.10}_{-0.13} \times 10^{-11}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ to 1.31$^{+0.09}_{-0.04} \times 10^{-12}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$), the Fe K$\alpha$ equivalent width (EW) increased from 0.18$^{+0.17}_{-0.12}$ to 0.61$^{+0.27}_{-0.25}$ keV, due to a depressed AGN continuum. We jointly fit the Chandra and NuSTAR spectra from 2016 using the physically-motivated MYTorus model, finding that the torus orientation is consistent with a face-on geometry, and lines of sight intersecting the torus are ruled out. While we measure no line-of-sight absorption, we measure a column density of $N_{\rm H}$ = 5.38$^{+14}_{-4.0} \times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ for gas out of the line-of-sight which reprocesses the X-ray emission. We find a high relative normalization between the Compton scattered emission and transmitted continuum, indicative of time lags between the primary X-ray source and reprocessing gas. We predict that the Fe K$\alpha$ line will respond to the decrease in AGN flux, which would manifest as a decrease in the Fe K$\alpha$ EW.
  • We present the Chandra imaging and spectral analysis of NGC 4968, a nearby (z = 0.00986) Seyfert 2 galaxy. We discover extended ($\sim$1 kpc) X-ray emission in the soft band (0.5 - 2 keV) that is neither coincident with the narrow line region nor the extended radio emission. Based on spectral modeling, it is linked to on-going star formation ($\sim$2.6-4 M$_{\sun}$ yr$^{-1}$). The soft emission at circumnuclear scales (inner $\sim$400 pc) originates from hot gas, with kT $\sim$ 0.7 keV, while the most extended thermal emission is cooler (kT $\sim$ 0.3 keV). We refine previous measurements of the extreme Fe K$\alpha$ equivalent width in this source (EW = 2.5$^{+2.6}_{-1.0}$ keV), which suggests the central engine is completely embedded within Compton-thick levels of obscuration. Using physically motivated models fit to the Chandra spectrum, we derive a Compton-thick column density ($N_{\rm H} > 1.25\times10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$) and an intrinsic hard (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity of $\sim$3-8$\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (depending on the presumed geometry of the obscurer), which is over two orders of magnitude larger than that observed. The large Fe K$\alpha$ EW suggests a spherical covering geometry, which could be confirmed with X-ray measurements above 10 keV. NGC 4968 is similar to other active galaxies that exhibit extreme Fe K$\alpha$ EWs (i.e., $>$2 keV) in that they also contain ongoing star formation. This work supports the idea that gas associated with nuclear star formation may increase the covering factor of the enshrouding gas and play a role in obscuring AGN.
  • The uncertain origin of the recently-discovered `changing-looking' quasar phenomenon -- in which a luminous quasar dims significantly to a quiescent state in repeat spectroscopy over ~10 year timescales -- may present unexpected challenges to our understanding of quasar accretion. To better understand this phenomenon, we take a first step to building a sample of changing-look quasars with a systematic but simple archival search for these objects in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. By leveraging the >10 year baselines for objects with repeat spectroscopy, we uncover two new changing-look quasars, and a third discovered previously. Decomposition of the multi-epoch spectra and analysis of the broad emission lines suggest that the quasar accretion disk emission dims due to rapidly decreasing accretion rates (by factors of >2.5), while disfavoring changes in intrinsic dust extinction for the two objects where these analyses are possible. Broad emission line energetics also support intrinsic dimming of quasar emission as the origin for this phenomenon rather than transient tidal disruption events or supernovae. Although our search criteria included quasars at all redshifts and transitions from either quasar-like to galaxy-like states or the reverse, all of the clear cases of changing-look quasars discovered were at relatively low-redshift (z ~ 0.2 - 0.3) and only exhibit quasar-like to galaxy-like transitions.
  • We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of 115 deg^2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its 'warm' mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z > 3 to test various models for "feedback" from active galactic nuclei (AGN). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z > 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5{\sigma} depths of 6.13 {\mu}Jy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 {\mu}Jy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively - depths significantly fainter than WISE. We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically-confirmed quasars (98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z > 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 {\mu}m-only detection catalog containing 6.1 million sources, a 4.5 {\mu}m-only detection catalog containing 6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing 5.4 million sources.
  • Some reddened quasars appear to be transitional objects in the merger-induced black hole growth/galaxy evolution paradigm, where a heavily obscured nucleus starts to be unveiled by powerful quasar winds evacuating the surrounding cocoon of dust and gas. Hard X-ray observations are able to peer through this gas and dust, revealing the properties of circumnuclear obscuration. Here, we present NuSTAR and XMM-Newton/Chandra observations of FIRST-2MASS selected red quasars F2M 0830+3759 and F2M 1227+3214. We find that though F2M 0830+3759 is moderately obscured ($N_{\rm H,Z} = 2.1\pm0.2 \times10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) and F2M 1227+3214 is mildly absorbed ($N_{\rm H,Z} = 3.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$) along the line-of-sight, heavier global obscuration may be present in both sources, with $N_{\rm H,S} = 3.7^{+4.1}_{-2.6} \times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $< 5.5\times10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, for F2M 0830+3759 and F2M 1227+3214, respectively. F2M 0830+3759 also has an excess of soft X-ray emission below 1 keV which is well accommodated by a model where 7% of the intrinsic AGN X-ray emission is scattered into the line-of-sight. While F2M 1227+3214 has a dust-to-gas ratio ($E(B-V)$/$N_{\rm H}$) consistent with the Galactic value, the $E(B-V)$/$N_{\rm H}$ value for F2M 0830+3759 is lower than the Galactic standard, consistent with the paradigm that the dust resides on galactic scales while the X-ray reprocessing gas originates within the dust-sublimation zone of the broad-line-region. The X-ray and 6.1$\mu$m luminosities of these red quasars are consistent with the empirical relations derived for high-luminosity, unobscured quasars, extending the parameter space of obscured AGN previously observed by NuSTAR to higher luminosities.
  • Capitalizing on the all-sky coverage of {\it WISE}, and the 35\% and 50\% sky coverage from SDSS and Pan-STARRS, respectively, we explore the efficacy of $m_{R}$ (optical) - $m_{3.4 \mu m}$ (mid-infrared), hereafter $R-W1$, as a color diagnostic to identify obscured supermassive black hole accretion in wide-area X-ray surveys. We use the $\sim$16.5 deg$^2$ Stripe 82 X-ray survey data as a test-bed to compare $R-W1$ with $R-K$, an oft-used obscured AGN selection criterion, and examine where different classes of objects lie in this parameter space. Most stars follow a well-defined path in $R-K$ vs. $R-W1$ space. We demonstrate that optically normal galaxies hosting X-ray AGN at redshifts $0.5<z<1$ can be recovered with an $R-W1>4$ color-cut, while they typically are not selected as AGN based on their $W1-W2$ colors. Additionally, different observed X-ray luminosity bins favor different regions in $R-W1$ parameter space: moderate luminosity AGN ($10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1} < L_{\rm 0.5-10 keV} < 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$) tend to have red colors while the highest luminosity AGN ($L_{\rm 0.5-10 keV} > 10^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$) have bluer colors; higher spectroscopic completeness of the Stripe 82X sample is needed to determine whether this is a selection effect or an intrinsic property. Finally, we parameterize X-ray obscuration of Stripe 82X AGN by calculating their hardness ratios (HRs) and find no clear trends between HR and optical reddening. Our results will help inform best-effort practices in following-up obscured AGN candidates in current and future wide-area, shallow X-ray surveys, including the all-sky {\it eROSITA} mission.
  • We release the next installment of the Stripe 82 X-ray survey point-source catalog, which currently covers 31.3 deg$^2$ of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 Legacy field. In total, 6181 unique X-ray sources are significantly detected with {\it XMM-Newton} ($>5\sigma$) and {\it Chandra} ($>4.5\sigma$). This catalog release includes data from {\it XMM-Newton} cycle AO 13, which approximately doubled the Stripe 82X survey area. The flux limits of the Stripe 82X survey are $8.7\times10^{-16}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, $4.7\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, and $2.1\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in the soft (0.5-2 keV), hard (2-10 keV), and full bands (0.5-10 keV), respectively, with approximate half-area survey flux limits of $5.4\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, $2.9\times10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, and $1.7\times10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. We matched the X-ray source lists to available multi-wavelength catalogs, including updated matches to the previous release of the Stripe 82X survey; 88\% of the sample is matched to a multi-wavelength counterpart. Due to the wide area of Stripe 82X and rich ancillary multi-wavelength data, including coadded SDSS photometry, mid-infrared {\it WISE} coverage, near-infrared coverage from UKIDSS and VHS, ultraviolet coverage from {\it GALEX}, radio coverage from FIRST, and far-infrared coverage from {\it Herschel}, as well as existing $\sim$30\% optical spectroscopic completeness, we are beginning to uncover rare objects, such as obscured high-luminosity AGN at high-redshift. The Stripe 82X point source catalog is a valuable dataset for constraining how this population grows and evolves, as well as for studying how they interact with the galaxies in which they live.
  • SDSS J015957.64+003310.5 is an X-ray selected, $z=0.31$ AGN from the Stripe 82X survey that transitioned from a Type 1 quasar to a Type 1.9 AGN between 2000 and 2010. This is the most distant AGN, and first quasar, yet observed to have undergone such a dramatic change. We re-observed the source with the double spectrograph on the Palomar 5m telescope in July 2014 and found that the spectrum is unchanged since 2010. From fitting the optical spectra, we find that the AGN flux dropped by a factor of 6 between 2000 and 2010 while the broad H$\alpha$ emission faded and broadened. Serendipitous X-ray observations caught the source in both the bright and dim state, showing a similar 2-10 keV flux diminution as the optical while lacking signatures of obscuration. The optical and X-ray changes coincide with $g$-band magnitude variations over multiple epochs of Stripe 82 observations. We demonstrate that variable absorption, as might be expected from the simplest AGN unification paradigm, does not explain the observed photometric or spectral properties. We interpret the changing state of J0159+0033 to be caused by dimming of the AGN continuum, reducing the supply of ionizing photons available to excite gas in the immediate vicinity around the black hole. J0159+0033 provides insight into the intermittency of black hole growth in quasars, as well as an unprecedented opportunity to study quasar physics (in the bright state) and the host galaxy (in the dim state), which has been impossible to do in a single sources until now.
  • Using self-consistent, physically motivated models, we investigate the X-ray obscuration in 19 Type 2 [OIII] 5007 \AA\ selected AGN, 9 of which are local Seyfert 2 galaxies and 10 of which are Type 2 quasar candidates. We derive reliable line-of-sight and global column densities for these objects, which is the first time this has been reported for an AGN sample; 4 AGN have significantly different global and line-of-sight column densities. Five sources are heavily obscured to Compton-thick. We comment on interesting sources revealed by our spectral modeling, including a candidate ``naked'' Sy2. After correcting for absorption, we find that the ratio of the rest-frame, 2-10 keV luminosity (L$_{\rm 2-10keV,in}$) to L$_{\rm [OIII]}$ is 1.54 $\pm$ 0.49 dex which is essentially identical to the mean Type 1 AGN value. The Fe K$\alpha$ luminosity is significantly correlated with L$_{\rm [OIII]}$, but with substantial scatter. Finally, we do not find a trend between L$_{\rm 2-10keV,in}$ and global or line-of-sight column density, between column density and redshift, between column density and scattering fraction or between scattering fraction and redshift.
  • We have analyzed the {\it XMM-Newton} and {\it Chandra} data overlapping $\sim$16.5 deg$^2$ of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82, including $\sim$4.6 deg$^2$ of proprietary {\it XMM-Newton} data that we present here. In total, 3362 unique X-ray sources are detected at high significance. We derive the {\it XMM-Newton} number counts and compare them with our previously reported {\it Chandra} Log$N$-Log$S$ relations and other X-ray surveys. The Stripe 82 X-ray source lists have been matched to multi-wavelength catalogs using a maximum likelihood estimator algorithm. We discovered the highest redshift ($z=5.86$) quasar yet identified in an X-ray survey. We find 2.5 times more high luminosity (L$_x \geq 10^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$) AGN than the smaller area {\it Chandra} and {\it XMM-Newton} survey of COSMOS and 1.3 times as many identified by XBo\"otes. Comparing the high luminosity AGN we have identified with those predicted by population synthesis models, our results suggest that this AGN population is a more important component of cosmic black hole growth than previously appreciated. Approximately a third of the X-ray sources not detected in the optical are identified in the infrared, making them candidates for the elusive population of obscured high luminosity AGN in the early universe.
  • We present the first results of a wide area X-ray survey within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, a 300 deg$^2$ region of the sky with a substantial investment in multi-wavelength coverage. We analyzed archival {\it Chandra} observations that cover 7.5 deg$^2$ within Stripe 82 ("Stripe 82 ACX"), reaching 4.5$\sigma$ flux limits of 7.9$\times10^{-16}$, 3.4$\times10^{-15}$ and 1.8$\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in the soft (0.5-2 keV), hard (2-7 keV) and full (0.5-7 keV) bands, to find 774, 239 and 1118 X-ray sources, respectively. Three hundred twenty-one sources are detected only in the full band and 9 sources are detected solely in the soft band. Utilizing data products from the {\it Chandra} Source Catalog, we construct independent Log$N$-Log$S$ relationships, detailing the number density of X-ray sources as a function of flux, which show general agreement with previous {\it Chandra} surveys. We compare the luminosity distribution of Stripe 82 ACX with the smaller, deeper CDF-S + E-CDFS surveys and with {\it Chandra}-COSMOS, illustrating the benefit of wide-area surveys in locating high luminosity AGN. We also investigate the differences and similarities of X-ray and optical selection to uncover obscured AGN in the local Universe. Finally, we estimate the population of AGN we expect to find with increased coverage of 100 deg$^2$ or 300 deg$^2$, which will provide unprecedented insight into the high redshift, high luminosity regime of black hole growth currently under-represented in X-ray surveys.
  • Using the spectra of a sample of $\sim$28,000 nearby obscured active galaxies from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we probe the connection between AGN activity and star formation over a range of radial scales in the host galaxy. We use the extinction-corrected luminosity of the [OIII] 5007 \AA\ line as a proxy of intrinsic AGN power and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion rate. The star formation rates (SFRs) are taken from the MPA-JHU value-added catalog and are measured through the 3$^{\prime\prime}$ SDSS aperture. We construct matched samples of galaxies covering a range in redshifts. With increasing redshift, the projected aperture size encompasses increasing amounts of the host galaxy. This allows us to trace the radial distribution of star-formation as a function of AGN luminosity. We find that the star formation becomes more centrally concentrated with increasing AGN luminosity and Eddington ratio. This implies that such circumnuclear star formation is associated with AGN activity, and that it increasingly dominates over omnipresent disk star formation at higher AGN luminosities, placing critical constraints on theoretical models that link host galaxy star formation and SMBH fueling. We parametrize this relationship and find that the star formation on radial scales $<$1.7 kpc, when including a constant disk component, has a sub-linear dependence on SMBH accretion rate: $SFR \propto \dot{M}^{0.36}$, suggesting that angular momentum transfer through the disk limits accretion efficiency rather than the supply from stellar mass loss.
  • We have explored the interplay of star formation and AGN activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e. L$_{x,AGN}$ and L$_{x,SF}$) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L$_{x,AGN}$ and L$_{x,SF}$ from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L$_{x,AGN}$ and L$_{x,SF}$ derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3\sigma\ confidence level. Using the infrared [NeII]12.8\mu m and [OIV]26\mu m lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L$_{x,SF}$ and L$_{x,AGN}$ at the 3\sigma\ level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGN.
  • We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from SDSS and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic contributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [NeII] 12.8 \mu m emission-line is well correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGN show a clear excess of [NeIII] 15.6 \mu m emission relative to star forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including: the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [NeV] 14.3 \mu m to [NeII] \mu m 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7, 11.3, and 17 $\mu m$ PAH features, and the optical "D" parameter which measures the distance a source lies from the locus of star forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN-dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 \mu m feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.
  • We have analyzed archival \textit{Chandra} and \textit{XMM-Newton} data for two nearly complete homogeneously selected samples of type 2 Seyfert galaxies (Sy2s). These samples were selected based on intrinsic Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) flux proxies: a mid-infrared (MIR) sample from the original IRAS 12$\mu$m survey and an optical ([OIII]$\lambda$ 5007 \AA\ flux limited) sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), providing a total of 45 Sy2s. As the MIR and [OIII] fluxes are largely unaffected by AGN obscuration, these samples can present an unbiased estimate of the Compton-thick (column density N$_H > 10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$) subpopulation. We find that the majority of this combined sample is likely heavily obscured, as evidenced by the 2-10 keV X-ray attenuation (normalized by intrinsic flux diagnostics) and the large Fe K$\alpha$ equivalent widths (several hundred eV to over 1 keV). A wide range of these obscuration diagnostics is present, showing a continuum of column densities, rather than a clear segregation into Compton-thick and Compton-thin sub-populations. We find that in several instances, the fitted column densities severely under-represent the attenuation implied by these obscuration diagnostics, indicating that simple X-ray models may not always recover the intrinsic absorption. We compared AGN and host galaxy properties, such as intrinsic luminosity, central black hole mass, accretion rate, and star formation rate with obscuration diagnostics. No convincing evidence exists to link obscured sources with unique host galaxy populations from their less absorbed counterparts. Finally, we estimate that a majority of these Seyfert 2s will be detectable in the 10-40 keV range by the future NuSTAR mission, which would confirm whether these heavily absorbed sources are indeed Compton-thick.
  • We consider five indicators for intrinsic AGN luminosity: the luminosities of the [OIII]$\lambda$5007 line, the [OIV]25.89$\mu$m line, the mid-infrared (MIR) continuum emission by the torus, and the radio and hard X-ray (E $>$ 10keV) continuum emission. We compare these different proxies using two complete samples of low-redshift type 2 AGN selected in a homogeneous way based on different indicators: an optically selected [OIII] sample and a mid-infrared selected 12$\mu$m sample. We examine the correlations between all five different proxies, and find better agreement for the [OIV], MIR, and [OIII] luminosities than for the hard X-ray and radio luminosities. Next, we compare the ratios of the fluxes of the different proxies to their values in unobscured Type 1 AGN. The agreement is best for the ratio of the [OIV] and MIR fluxes, while the ratios of the hard X-ray to [OIII], [OIV], and MIR fluxes are systematically low by about an order-of-magnitude in the Type 2 AGN, indicating that hard X-ray selected samples do not represent the full Type 2 AGN population. In a similar spirit, we compare different optical and MIR diagnostics of the relative energetic contributions of AGN and star formation processes in our samples of Type 2 AGN. We find good agreement between the various diagnostic parameters, such as the equivalent width of the MIR polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features, the ratio of the MIR [OIV]/[NeII] emission-lines, the spectral index of the MIR continuum, and the commonly used optical emission-line ratios. Finally, we test whether the presence of cold gas associated with star-formation leads to an enhanced conversion efficiency of AGN ionizing radiation into [OIII] or [OIV] emission. We find that no compelling evidence exists for this scenario for the luminosities represented in this sample (L$_{bol}$ $\approx$ 10$^{9}$ - 8 $\times$ 10$^{11}$ L$_{\sun}$). (abridged)
  • (abridged)The majority of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) suffer from significant obscuration by surrounding dust and gas. X-ray surveys in the 2-10 keV band will miss the most heavily-obscured AGN in which the absorbing column density exceeds $\sim10^{24}$cm$^{-2}$ (the Compton-thick AGN). It is therefore vital to know the fraction of AGN that are missed in such X-rays surveys and to determine if these AGN represent some distinct population in terms of the fundamental properties of AGN and/or their host galaxies. In this paper we present the analysis of \textit{XMM-Newton} X-ray data for a complete sample of 17 low-redshift Type 2 Seyfert galaxies chosen from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey based solely on the high observed flux of the [OIII]$\lambda$5007 emission-line. This line is formed in the Narrow Line Region hundreds of parsecs away from the central engine. Thus, unlike the X-ray emission, it is not affected by obscuration due to the torus surrounding the black hole. It therefore provides a useful isotropic indicator of the AGN luminosity. As additional indicators of the intrinsic AGN luminosity, we use the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure the luminosities of the mid-infrared continuum and the [OIV]25.89$\mu$m narrow emission-line. We then use the ratio of the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity to the [OIII], [OIV], and mid-infrared luminosities to assess the amount of X-ray obscuration and to distinguish between Compton-thick and Compton-thin objects. We find that the majority of the sources suffer significant amounts of obscuration: the observed 2-10 keV emission is depressed by more than an order-of-magnitude in 11 of the 17 cases (as expected for Compton-thick sources).
  • Vela X is a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) associated with the active pulsar B0833-45 and contained within the Vela supernova remnant (SNR). A collimated X-ray filament ("cocoon") extends south-southwest from the pulsar to the center of Vela X. VLA observations uncovered radio emission coincident with the eastern edge of the cocoon and H.E.S.S. has detected TeV $\gamma$-ray emission from this region as well. Using XMM-\textit{Newton} archival data, covering the southern portion of this feature, we analyze the X-ray properties of the cocoon. The X-ray data are best fit by an absorbed nonequilibrium plasma model with a powerlaw component. Our analysis of the thermal emission shows enhanced abundances of O, Ne, and Mg within the cocoon, indicating the presence of ejecta-rich material from the propagation of the SNR reverse shock, consistent with Vela X being a disrupted PWN. We investigate the physical processes that excite the electrons in the PWN to emit in the radio, X-ray and $\gamma$-ray bands. The radio and non-thermal X-ray emission can be explained by synchrotron emission. We model the $\gamma$-ray emission by Inverse Compton scattering of electrons off of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. We use a 3-component broken power law to model the synchrotron emission, finding an intrinsic break in the electron spectrum at $\sim5 \times 10^{6}$ keV and a cooling break at $\sim$ 5.5 $\times 10^{10}$ keV. This cooling break along with a magnetic field strength of 5 $\times 10^{-6}$ G indicate that the synchrotron break occurs at $\sim$1 keV.