• We present astroplan - an open source, open development, Astropy affiliated package for ground-based observation planning and scheduling in Python. astroplan is designed to provide efficient access to common observational quantities such as celestial rise, set, and meridian transit times and simple transformations from sky coordinates to altitude-azimuth coordinates without requiring a detailed understanding of astropy's implementation of coordinate systems. astroplan provides convenience functions to generate common observational plots such as airmass and parallactic angle as a function of time, along with basic sky (finder) charts. Users can determine whether or not a target is observable given a variety of observing constraints, such as airmass limits, time ranges, Moon illumination/separation ranges, and more. A selection of observation schedulers are included which divide observing time among a list of targets, given observing constraints on those targets. Contributions to the source code from the community are welcome.
  • Theoretical models of stars constitute a fundamental bedrock upon which much of astrophysics is built, but large swaths of model parameter space remain uncalibrated by observations. The best calibrators are eclipsing binaries in clusters, allowing measurement of masses, radii, luminosities, and temperatures, for stars of known metallicity and age. We present the discovery and detailed characterization of PTFEB132.707+19.810, a P=6.0 day eclipsing binary in the Praesepe cluster ($\tau$~600--800 Myr; [Fe/H]=0.14$\pm$0.04). The system contains two late-type stars (SpT$_P$=M3.5$\pm$0.2; SpT$_S$=M4.3$\pm$0.7) with precise masses ($M_p=0.3953\pm0.0020$~$M_{\odot}$; $M_s=0.2098\pm0.0014$~$M_{\odot}$) and radii ($R_p=0.363\pm0.008$~$R_{\odot}$; $R_s=0.272\pm0.012$~$R_{\odot}$). Neither star meets the predictions of stellar evolutionary models. The primary has the expected radius, but is cooler and less luminous, while the secondary has the expected luminosity, but is cooler and substantially larger (by 20%). The system is not tidally locked or circularized. Exploiting a fortuitous 4:5 commensurability between $P_{orb}$ and $P_{rot,prim}$, we demonstrate that fitting errors from the unknown spot configuration only change the inferred radii by <1--2%. We also analyze subsets of data to test the robustness of radius measurements; the radius sum is more robust to systematic errors and preferable for model comparisons. We also test plausible changes in limb darkening, and find corresponding uncertainties of ~1%. Finally, we validate our pipeline using extant data for GU Boo, finding that our independent results match previous radii to within the mutual uncertainties (2--3%). We therefore suggest that the substantial discrepancies are astrophysical; since they are larger than for old field stars, they may be tied to the intermediate age of PTFEB132.707+19.810.
  • We analyze {\it K2} light curves for 794 low-mass ($1 > M_* > 0.1$ $M_{\odot}$) members of the $\approx$650-Myr-old open cluster Praesepe, and measure rotation periods ($P_{rot}$) for 677 of these stars. We find that half of the rapidly rotating $>$0.3 $M_{\odot}$ stars are confirmed or candidate binary systems. The remaining $>0.3$ $M_{\odot}$ fast rotators have not been searched for companions, and are therefore not confirmed single stars. We found previously that nearly all rapidly rotating $>$0.3 $M_{\odot}$ stars in the Hyades are binaries, but we require deeper binary searches in Praesepe to confirm whether binaries in these two co-eval clusters have different $P_{rot}$ distributions. We also compare the observed $P_{rot}$ distribution in Praesepe to that predicted by models of angular-momentum evolution. We do not observe the clear bimodal $P_{rot}$ distribution predicted by Brown (2014) for $>$0.5 $M_{\odot}$ stars at the age of Praesepe, but 0.25$-$0.5 $M_{\odot}$ stars do show stronger bimodality. In addition, we find that $>$60\% of early M dwarfs in Praesepe rotate more slowly than predicted at 650 Myr by Matt et al. (2015), which suggests an increase in braking efficiency for these stars relative to solar-type stars and fully convective stars. The incompleteness of surveys for binaries in open clusters likely impacts our comparison with these models, since the models only attempt to describe the evolution of isolated single stars.
  • Empirical calibrations of the stellar age-rotation-activity relation (ARAR) rely on observations of the co-eval populations of stars in open clusters. We used the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study M37, a 500-Myr-old open cluster that has been extensively surveyed for rotation periods ($P_{\rm rot}$). M37 was observed almost continuously for five days, for a total of 440.5 ksec, to measure stellar X-ray luminosities ($L_{\mathrm{X}}$), a proxy for coronal activity, across a wide range of masses. The cluster's membership catalog was revisited to calculate updated membership probabilities from photometric data and each star's distance to the cluster center. The result is a comprehensive sample of 1699 M37 members: 426 with $P_{\rm rot}$, 278 with X-ray detections, and 76 with both. We calculate Rossby numbers, $R_o = P_{\rm rot}/\tau$, where $\tau$ is the convective turnover time, and ratios of the X-ray-to-bolometric luminosity, $L_{\rm X}/L_{\rm bol}$, to minimize mass dependencies in our characterization of the rotation-coronal activity relation at 500 Myr. We find that fast rotators, for which $R_o<0.09\pm0.01$, show saturated levels of activity, with log($L_{\rm X}/L_{\rm bol}$)$=-3.06\pm0.04$. For $R_o\geq0.09\pm0.01$, activity is unsaturated and follows a power law of the form $R_o^\beta$, where $\beta$=$-2.03_{-0.14}^{+0.17}$. This is the largest sample available for analyzing the dependence of coronal emission on rotation for a single-aged population, covering stellar masses in the range 0.4$-$1.3 $M_{\odot}$, $P_{\rm rot}$ in the range 0.4$-$12.8 d, and $L_{\rm X}$ in the range 10$^{28.4-30.5}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Our results make M37 a new benchmark open cluster for calibrating the ARAR at ages of $\approx$500 Myr.
  • We examine the hypothesis that the red near-infrared colors of some L dwarfs could be explained by a "dust haze" of small particles in their upper atmospheres. This dust haze would exist in conjunction with the clouds found in dwarfs with more typical colors. We developed a model which uses Mie theory and the Hansen particle size distributions to reproduce the extinction due to the proposed dust haze. We apply our method to 23 young L dwarfs and 23 red field L dwarfs. We constrain the properties of the dust haze including particle size distribution and column density using Markov-Chain Monte Carlo methods. We find that sub-micron range silicate grains reproduce the observed reddening. Current brown dwarf atmosphere models include large grain (1--100~$\mu m$) dust clouds but not submicron dust grains. Our results provide a strong proof of concept and motivate a combination of large and small dust grains in brown dwarf atmosphere models.