• Quantum coherence, the ability to control the phases in superposition states is a resource, and it is of crucial importance, therefore, to understand how it is consumed in use. It has been suggested that catalytic coherence is possible, that is repeated use of the coherence without degradation or reduction in performance. The claim has particular relevance for quantum thermodynamics because, were it true, it would allow free energy that is locked in coherence to be extracted $\textit{indefinitely}$. We address this issue directly with a careful analysis of the proposal by $\AA{}$berg. We find that coherence $\textit{cannot}$ be used catalytically, or even repeatedly without limit.
  • We investigate the optimal measurement strategy for state discrimination of the trine ensemble of qubit states prepared with arbitrary prior probabilities. Our approach generates the minimum achievable probability of error and also the maximum confidence strategy. Although various cases with symmetry have been considered and solution techniques put forward in the literature, to our knowledge this is only the second such closed form, analytical, arbitrary prior, example available for the minimum-error figure of merit, after the simplest and well-known two-state example.
  • Linear optical operations are fundamental and significant for both quantum mechanics and classical technologies. We demonstrate a non-cascaded approach to perform arbitrary unitary and non-unitary linear operations for N-dimensional phase-coherent spatial modes with meticulously designed phase gratings. As implemented on spatial light modulators (SLMs), the unitary transformation matrix has been realized with dimensionalities ranging from 7 to 24 and the corresponding fidelities are from 95.1% to 82.1%. For the non-unitary operators, a matrix is presented for the tomography of a 4-level quantum system with a fidelity of 94.9%. Thus, the linear operator has been successfully implemented with much higher dimensionality than that in previous reports. It should be mentioned that our method is not limited to SLMs and can be easily applied on other devices. Thus we believe that our proposal provides another option to perform linear operation with a simple, fixed, error-tolerant and scalable scheme.
  • We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy: a new technique that enables the determination of the orientated optical activity pseudotensor components $B_{XX}$, $B_{YY}$ and $B_{ZZ}$ of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample and provides an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral solely by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centres. The principles that underpin chiral rotational spectroscopy could be exploited moreover in the search for molecular chirality in space, which, if found, might add weight to hypotheses that biological homochirality and indeed life itself are of cosmic origin. A basic design for a chiral rotational spectrometer together with a model of its functionality is given. Our proposed technique offers the more familiar polarisability components $\alpha_{XX}$, $\alpha_{YY}$ and $\alpha_{ZZ}$ as by-products, which could see it find use even for achiral molecules.
  • We consider the problem of minimum-error quantum state discrimination for single-qubit mixed states. We present a method which uses the Helstrom conditions constructively and analytically; this algebraic approach is complementary to existing geometric methods, and solves the problem for any number of arbitrary signal states with arbitrary prior probabilities.
  • We know that in empty space there is no preferred state of rest. This is true both in special relativity but also in Newtonian mechanics with its associated Galilean relativity. It comes as something of a surprise, therefore, to discover the existence a friction force associated with spontaneous emission. he resolution of this paradox relies on a central idea from special relativity even though our derivation of it is non-relativistic. We examine the possibility that the physics underlying this effect might be explored in an ion trap, via the observation of a superposition of different mass states.
  • The Roentgen term is an often neglected contribution to the interaction between an atom and an electromagnetic field in the electric dipole approximation. In this work we discuss how this interaction term leads to a difference between the kinetic and canonical momentum of an atom which, in turn, leads to surprising radiation forces acting on the atom. We use a number of examples to explore the main features of this interaction, namely forces acting against the expected dipole force or accelerations perpendicular to the beam propagation axis.
  • Sir Peter Knight is a pioneer in quantum optics which has now grown to an important branch of modern physics to study the foundations and applications of quantum physics. He is leading an effort to develop new technologies from quantum mechanics. In this collection of essays, we recall the time we were working with him as a postdoc or a PhD student and look at how the time with him has influenced our research.
  • Probabilities enter quantum mechanics via Born's rule, the uniqueness of which was proven by Gleason. Busch subsequently relaxed the assumptions of this proof, expanding its domain of applicability in the process. Extending this work to sequential measurement processes is the aim of this paper. Given only a simple set of postulates, a probability measure is derived utilising the concept of Liouville space and the most general permissible quantum channel arises in the same manner. Super-Liouville space is constructed and a Bayesian interpretation of this object is provided. An important application of the new method is demonstrated, providing an axiomatic derivation of important results of the BB84 protocol in quantum cryptography.
  • State discrimination is a useful test problem with which to clarify the power and limitations of different classes of measurement. We consider the problem of discriminating between given states of a bi-partite quantum system via sequential measurement of the subsystems, with classical feed-forward of measurement results. Our aim is to understand when sequential measurements, which are relatively easy to implement experimentally, perform as well, or almost as well as optimal joint measurements, which are in general more technologically challenging. We construct conditions that the optimal sequential measurement must satisfy, analogous to the well-known Helstrom conditions for minimum error discrimination in the unrestricted case. We give several examples and compare the optimal probability of correctly identifying the state via global versus sequential measurement strategies.
  • The four-qubit states $\lvert\chi^{ij}\rangle$, exhibiting genuinely multi-partite entanglement have been shown to have many interesting properties and have been suggested for novel applications in quantum information processing. In this work we propose a simple quantum circuit and its corresponding optical embodiment with which to prepare photon pairs in the $\lvert\chi^{ij}\rangle$ states. Our approach uses hyper-entangled photon pairs, produced by the type-I spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) process in two contiguous nonlinear crystals, together with a set of simple linear-optical transformations. Our photon pairs are maximally hyper-entangled in both their polarisation and orbital angular momentum (OAM). After one of these daughter photons passes through our optical setup, we obtain photon pairs in the hyper-entangled state $\lvert\chi^{00}\rangle$, and the $\lvert\chi^{ij}\rangle$ states can be achieved by further simple transformations.
  • We show how a simple calculation leads to the surprising result that an excited two-level atom moving through vacuum sees a tiny friction force of first order in v/c. At first sight this seems to be in obvious contradiction to other calculations showing that the interaction with the vacuum does not change the velocity of an atom. It is yet more surprising that this change in the atom's momentum turns out to be a necessary result of energy and momentum conservation in special relativity.
  • Two particle interference phenomena, such as the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect, are a direct manifestation of the nature of the symmetry properties of indistinguishable particles as described by quantum mechanics. The Hong-Ou-Mandel effect has recently been applied as a tool for pure state tomography of a single photon. In this article, we generalise the method to extract additional information for a pure state and extend this to the full tomography of mixed states as well. The formalism is kept general enough to apply to both boson and fermion based interferometry. Our theoretical discussion is accompanied by two proposals of interferometric setups that allow the measurement of a tomographically complete set of observables for single photon quantum states.
  • We determine the shared information that can be extracted from time-bin entangled photons using frame encoding. We consider photons generated by a general down-conversion source and also model losses, dark counts and the effects of multiple photons within each frame. Furthermore, we describe a procedure for including other imperfections such as after-pulsing, detector dead-times and jitter. The results are illustrated by deriving analytic expressions for the maximum information that can be extracted from high-dimensional time-bin entangled photons generated by a spontaneous parametric down conversion. A key finding is that under realistic conditions and using standard SPAD detectors one can still choose frame size so as to extract over 10 bits per photon. These results are thus useful for experiments on high-dimensional quantum-key distribution system.
  • As an alternative to conventional multi-pixel cameras, single-pixel cameras enable images to be recorded using a single detector that measures the correlations between the scene and a set of patterns. However, to fully sample a scene in this way requires at least the same number of correlation measurements as there are pixels in the reconstructed image. Therefore single-pixel imaging systems typically exhibit low frame-rates. To mitigate this, a range of compressive sensing techniques have been developed which rely on a priori knowledge of the scene to reconstruct images from an under-sampled set of measurements. In this work we take a different approach and adopt a strategy inspired by the foveated vision systems found in the animal kingdom - a framework that exploits the spatio-temporal redundancy present in many dynamic scenes. In our single-pixel imaging system a high-resolution foveal region follows motion within the scene, but unlike a simple zoom, every frame delivers new spatial information from across the entire field-of-view. Using this approach we demonstrate a four-fold reduction in the time taken to record the detail of rapidly evolving features, whilst simultaneously accumulating detail of more slowly evolving regions over several consecutive frames. This tiered super-sampling technique enables the reconstruction of video streams in which both the resolution and the effective exposure-time spatially vary and adapt dynamically in response to the evolution of the scene. The methods described here can complement existing compressive sensing approaches and may be applied to enhance a variety of computational imagers that rely on sequential correlation measurements.
  • We recognise that Stegosaurus exhibited exterior chirality and could, therefore, have assumed either of two distinct, mirror-image forms. Our preliminary investigations suggest that both existed. Stegosaurus's exterior chirality raises new questions such as the validity of well-known exhibits whilst offering new insights into long-standing questions such as the function of the plates. We inform our discussions throughout with examples of modern-day animals that exhibit exterior chirality.
  • We analyse the properties of a strongly-damped quantum harmonic oscillator by means of an exact diagonalisation of the full Hamiltonian, including both the oscillator and the reservoir degrees of freedom to which it is coupled. Many of the properties of the oscillator, including its steady-state properties and entanglement with the reservoir can be understood and quantified in terms of a simple probability density, which we may associate with the ground-state frequency spectrum of the oscillator.
  • We respond to recent works by Bradshaw and Andrews on the discriminatory optical force for chiral molecules, in particular to the erroneous claims made by them concerning our earlier work.
  • We show how it is possible to operate end-to-end relays on a QKD network by treating each relay as a trusted eavesdropper operating an intercept/resend strategy. It is shown that, by introducing the concept of bit transport, the key rate compared to that of single-link channels is unaffected. The technique of bit transport extends the capability of QKD networks. We also discuss techniques for reducing the level of trust required in the relays. In particular we demonstrate that it is possible to create a simple quantum key exchange scheme using secret sharing such that by the addition of a single extra relay on a multi-relay channel requires the eavesdropper to compromise all the relays on the channel. By coupling this with multi-path capability and asynchronous quantum key establishment we show that, in effect, an eavesdropper has to compromise all relays on an entire network and collect data on the entire network from its inception.
  • We present a classical linear response theory for a magneto-dielectric material and determine the polariton dispersion relations. The electromagnetic field fluctuation spectra are obtained and polariton sum rules for their optical parameters are presented. The electromagnetic field for systems with multiple polariton branches is quantised in 3 dimensions and field operators are converted to 1-dimensional forms appropriate for parallel light beams. We show that the field-operator commutation relations agree with previous calculations that ignored polariton effects. The Abraham (kinetic) and Minkowski (canonical) momentum operators are introduced and their corresponding single-photon momenta are identified. The commutation relations of these and of their angular analogues support the identification, in particular, of the Minkowski momentum with the canonical momentum of the light. We exploit the Heaviside-Larmor symmetry of Maxwell's equations to obtain, very directly, the Einsetin-Laub force density for action on a magneto-dielectric. The surface and bulk contributions to the radiation pressure are calculated for the passage of an optical pulse into a semi-infinite sample.
  • We present a tensorial relative of the familiar affine connection and argue that it should be regarded as the gravitational field tensor. Remarkably, the Lagrangian density expressed in terms of this tensor has a simple form, which depends only on the metric and its first derivatives and, moreover, is a true scalar quantity. The geodesic equation, moreover, shows that our tensor plays a role that is strongly reminiscent of the gravitational field in Newtonian mechanics and this, together with other evidence, which we present, leads us to identify it as the gravitational field tensor. We calculate the gravitational field tensor for the Schwarzschild metric. We suggest some of the advantages to be gained from applying our tensor to the study of gravitational waves.
  • Recent years have seen vast progress in the generation and detection of structured light, with potential applications in high capacity optical data storage and continuous variable quantum technologies. Here we measure the transmission of structured light through cold rubidium atoms and observe regions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We use q-plates to generate a probe beam with azimuthally varying phase and polarisation structure, and its right and left circular polarisation components provide the probe and control of an EIT transition. We observe an azimuthal modulation of the absorption profile that is dictated by the phase and polarisation structure of the probe laser. Conventional EIT systems do not exhibit phase sensitivity. We show, however, that a weak transverse magnetic field closes the EIT transitions, thereby generating phase dependent dark states which in turn lead to phase dependent transparency, in agreement with our measurements.
  • That the speed of light in free space is constant is a cornerstone of modern physics. However, light beams have finite transverse size, which leads to a modification of their wavevectors resulting in a change to their phase and group velocities. We study the group velocity of single photons by measuring a change in their arrival time that results from changing the beam's transverse spatial structure. Using time-correlated photon pairs we show a reduction of the group velocity of photons in both a Bessel beam and photons in a focused Gaussian beam. In both cases, the delay is several microns over a propagation distance of the order of 1 m. Our work highlights that, even in free space, the invariance of the speed of light only applies to plane waves. Introducing spatial structure to an optical beam, even for a single photon, reduces the group velocity of the light by a readily measurable amount.
  • Quantum optical amplification that beats the noise addition limit for deterministic amplifiers has been realized experimentally using several different nondeterministic protocols. These schemes either require single-photon sources, or operate by noise addition and photon subtraction. Here we present an experimental demonstration of a protocol that allows nondeterministic amplification of known sets of coherent states with high gain and high fidelity. The experimental system employs the two mature quantum optical technologies of state comparison and photon subtraction and does not rely on elaborate quantum resources such as single-photon sources. The use of coherent states rather than single photons allows for an increased rate of amplification and a less complex photon source. Furthermore it means that the amplification is not restricted to low amplitude states. With respect to the two key parameters, fidelity and amplified state production rate, we demonstrate, without the use of quantum resources, significant improvements over previous experimental implementations.
  • Busch's theorem deriving the standard quantum probability rule can be regarded as a more general form of Gleason's theorem. Here we show that a further generalisation is possible by reducing the number of quantum postulates used by Busch. We do not assume that the positive measurement outcome operators are effects or that they form a probability operator measure. We derive a more general probability rule from which the standard rule can be obtained from the normal laws of probability when there is no measurement outcome information available, without the need for further quantum postulates. Our general probability rule has prediction-retrodiction symmetry and we show how it may be applied in quantum communications and in retrodictive quantum theory.