• Binary neutron-star mergers (BNSMs) are among the most readily detectable gravitational-wave (GW) sources with LIGO. They are also thought to produce short $\gamma$-ray bursts (SGRBs), and kilonovae that are powered by r-process nuclei. Detecting these phenomena simultaneously would provide an unprecedented view of the physics during and after the merger of two compact objects. Such a Rosetta Stone event was detected by LIGO/Virgo on 17 August 2017 at a distance of $\sim40$~Mpc. We monitored the position of the BNSM with ALMA at 338.5 GHz and GMRT at 1.4 GHz, from 1.4 to 44 days after the merger. Our observations rule out any afterglow more luminous than $3\times 10^{26}~{\rm erg~s}^{-1}$ in these bands, probing $>$2--4 dex fainter than previous SGRB limits. We match these limits, in conjunction with public data announcing the appearance of X-ray and radio emission in the weeks after the GW event, to templates of off-axis afterglows. Our broadband modeling suggests that GW170817 was accompanied by a SGRB and that the GRB jet, powered by $E_{\rm AG,\,iso}\sim10^{50}$~erg, had a half-opening angle of $\sim20^\circ$, and was misaligned by $\sim41^\circ$ from our line of sight. The data are also consistent with a more powerful, collimated jet: $E_{\rm AG,\,iso}\sim10^{51}$~erg, $\theta_{1/2,\,\rm jet}\sim5^\circ$, $\theta_{\rm obs}\sim17^\circ$. This is the most conclusive detection of an off-axis GRB afterglow and the first associated with a BNSM-GW event to date. We use the viewing angle estimates to infer the initial bulk Lorentz factor and true energy release of the burst.
  • Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are the most luminous supernovae in the universe. They are found in extreme star-forming galaxies and are probably connected with the death of massive stars. One hallmark of very massive progenitors would be a tendency to explode in very dense, UV-bright, and blue regions. In this paper we investigate the resolved host galaxy properties of two nearby hydrogen-poor SLSNe, PTF~11hrq and PTF~12dam. For both galaxies \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} multi-filter images were obtained. Additionally, we performe integral field spectroscopy of the host galaxy of PTF~11hrq using the Very Large Telescope Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (VLT/MUSE), and investigate the line strength, metallicity and kinematics. Neither PTF~11hrq nor PTF~12dam occurred in the bluest part of their host galaxies, although both galaxies have overall blue UV-to-optical colors. The MUSE data reveal a bright starbursting region in the host of PTF~11hrq, although far from the SN location. The SN exploded close to a region with disturbed kinematics, bluer color, stronger [OIII], and lower metallicity. The host galaxy is likely interacting with a companion. PTF~12dam occurred in one of the brightest pixels, in a starbursting galaxy with a complex morphology and a tidal tail, where interaction is also very likely. We speculate that SLSN explosions may originate from stars generated during star-formation episodes triggered by interaction. High resolution imaging and integral field spectroscopy are fundamental for a better understanding of SLSNe explosion sites and how star formation varies across their host galaxies.
  • An important constraint for galaxy evolution models is how much gas resides in galaxies, in particular at the peak of star formation z=1-3. We attempt a novel approach by letting long-duration Gamma Ray Bursts (LGRBs) x-ray their host galaxies and deliver column densities to us. This requires a good understanding of the obscurer and biases introduced by incomplete follow-up observations. We analyse the X-ray afterglow of all 844 Swift LGRBs to date for their column density $N_H$. To derive the population properties we propagate all uncertainties in a consistent Bayesian methodology. The $N_H$ distribution covers the $10^{20-23}\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$ range and shows no evolutionary effect. Higher obscurations, e.g. Compton-thick columns, could have been detected but are not observed. The $N_H$ distribution is consistent with sources randomly populating a ellipsoidal gas cloud of major axis $N_H^\text{major}=10^{23}\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$ with 0.22 dex intrinsic scatter between objects. The unbiased SHOALS survey of afterglows and hosts allows us to constrain the relation between Spitzer-derived stellar masses and X-ray derived column densities $N_H$. We find a well-constrained powerlaw relation of $N_H=10^{21.7}\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\times\left(M_{\star}/10^{9.5}M_{\odot}\right)^{1/3}$, with 0.5 dex intrinsic scatter between objects. The Milky Way and the Magellanic clouds also follow this relation. From the geometry of the obscurer, its stellar mass dependence and comparison with local galaxies we conclude that LGRBs are primarily obscured by galaxy-scale gas. Ray tracing of simulated Illustris galaxies reveals a relation of the same normalisation, but a steeper stellar-mass dependence and mild redshift evolution. Our new approach provides valuable insight into the gas residing in high-redshift galaxies.
  • The purported spiral host galaxy of GRB 020819B at z=0.41 has been seminal in establishing our view of the diversity of long-duration gamma-ray burst environments: optical spectroscopy of this host provided evidence that GRBs can form even at high metallicities, while millimetric observations suggested that GRBs may preferentially form in regions with minimal molecular gas. We report new observations from VLT (MUSE and X-shooter) which demonstrate that the purported host is an unrelated foreground galaxy. The probable radio afterglow is coincident with a compact, highly star-forming, dusty galaxy at z=1.9621. The revised redshift naturally explains the apparent nondetection of CO(3-2) line emission at the afterglow site from ALMA. There is no evidence that molecular gas properties in GRB host galaxies are unusual, and limited evidence that GRBs can form readily at super-Solar metallicity.
  • We present the first polarimetric observations of a Type I superluminous supernova (SLSN). LSQ14mo was observed with VLT/FORS2 at five different epochs in the V band, with the observations starting before maximum light and spanning 26 days in the rest frame (z=0.256). During this period, we do not detect any statistically significant evolution (< 2$\sigma$) in the Stokes parameters. The average values we obtain, corrected for interstellar polarisation in the Galaxy, are Q = -0.01% ($\pm$ 0.15%) and U = - 0.50% ($\pm$ 0.14%). This low polarisation can be entirely due to interstellar polarisation in the SN host galaxy. We conclude that, at least during the period of observations and at the optical depths probed, the photosphere of LSQ14mo does not present significant asymmetries, unlike most lower-luminosity hydrogen-poor SNe Ib/c. Alternatively, it is possible that we may have observed LSQ14mo from a special viewing angle. Supporting spectroscopy and photometry confirm that LSQ14mo is a typical SLSN I. Further studies of the polarisation of Type I SLSNe are required to determine whether the low levels of polarisation are a characteristic of the entire class and to also study the implications for the proposed explosion models.
  • We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 magnitudes, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SNII' with an s2 value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.
  • We present the results of modelling archival observations of type Ib SN 1999dn. In the spectra, two He I absorption features are seen: a slower component with larger opacity, and a more rapid He I component with smaller opacity. Complementary results are obtained from modelling the bolometric light curve of SN 1999dn, where a two-zone model (dense inner region, and less dense outer region) provides a much better fit than a one-zone model. A key result we find is that roughly equal amounts of radioactive material are found in both regions. The two-zone analytical model provides a more realistic representation of the structure of the ejecta, including mixing and asymmetries, which offers a physical explanation for how the radioactive material is propelled to, and mixed within, the outer regions. Our result supports the theoretical expectation that the radioactive content in the outflow of a type Ib supernova (SN) is thoroughly mixed. We fit our model to six additional SNe Ibc, of which the majority of the SNe Ib are best described by the two-zone model, and the majority of the SNe Ic by the one-zone model. Of the SNe Ic, only SN 2007gr was best fit by the two-zone model, indicating that the lack of helium spectral features for this event cannot be attributed to poor mixing.
  • GRB-selected galaxies are broadly known to be faint, blue, young, star-forming dwarf galaxies. This insight, however, is based in part on heterogeneous samples of optically selected, lower-redshift galaxies. To study the statistical properties of GRB-selected galaxies we here introduce The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) complete sample of 69 X-ray selected Swift GRB host galaxies spanning the redshift range 0.03-6.30 and summarise the first results of a large observational survey of these galaxies.
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful tracers of star-forming galaxies. We have defined a homogeneous subsample of 69 Swift GRB-selected galaxies spanning a very wide redshift range. Special attention has been devoted to making the sample optically unbiased through simple and well-defined selection criteria based on the high-energy properties of the bursts and their positions on the sky. Thanks to our extensive follow-up observations, this sample has now achieved a comparatively high degree of redshift completeness, and thus provides a legacy sample, useful for statistical studies of GRBs and their host galaxies. In this paper we present the survey design and summarize the results of our observing program conducted at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) aimed at obtaining the most basic properties of galaxies in this sample, including a catalog of R and Ks magnitudes and redshifts. We detect the host galaxies for 80 % of the GRBs in the sample, although only 42 % have Ks-band detections, which confirms that GRB-selected host galaxies are generally blue. The sample is not uniformly blue, however, with two extremely red objects detected. Moreover, galaxies hosting GRBs with no optical/NIR afterglows, whose identification therefore relies on X-ray localizations, are significantly brighter and redder than those with an optical/NIR afterglow. Our spectroscopic campaign has resulted in 77 % now having redshift measurements, with a median redshift of 2.14 +- 0.18. TOUGH alone includes 17 detected z > 2 Swift GRB host galaxies suitable for individual and statistical studies. Seven hosts have detections of the Ly-alpha emission line and we can exclude an early indication that Ly-alpha emission is ubiquitous among GRB hosts, but confirm that Ly-alpha is stronger in GRB-selected galaxies than in flux-limited samples of Lyman break galaxies.
  • The long and relatively faint gamma-ray burst GRB 060605 detected by \emph{Swift}/BAT lasted about 20 sec. Its afterglow could be observed with \emph{Swift}/XRT for nearly 1 day, while \emph{Swift}/UVOT could detect the afterglow during the first 6 hours after the event. Here, we report on integral field spectroscopy of its afterglow performed with PMAS/PPak mounted at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. In addition, we report on a detailed analysis of XRT and UVOT data and on the results of deep late-time VLT observations that reveal the GRB host galaxy. We find that the burst occurred at a redshift of $z$=3.773, possibly associated with a faint, $R_C=26.4 \pm 0.3$ host. Based on the optical and X-ray data, we deduce information on the SED of the afterglow, the position of the cooling frequency in the SED, the nature of the circumburst environment, its collimation factor, and its energetics. We find that the GRB fireball was expanding into a constant-density medium and that the explosion was collimated with a narrow half-opening angle of about 2.4 degrees. The initial Lorentz factor of the fireball was about 250; however, its beaming-corrected energy release in the gamma-ray band was comparably low. The optical, X-ray afterglow, on the other hand, was rather luminous. Finally, we find that the data are consistent within the error bars with an achromatic evolution of the afterglow during the suspected jet break time at about 0.27 days after the burst.