• Massive foreground galaxy clusters magnify and distort the light of objects behind them, permitting a view into both the extremely distant and intrinsically faint galaxy populations. We present here the z ~ 6 - 8 candidate high-redshift galaxies from the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS), a Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope survey of 41 massive galaxy clusters spanning an area of ~200 arcmin^2. These clusters were selected to be excellent lenses and we find similar high-redshift sample sizes and magnitude distributions as CLASH. We discover 321 candidate galaxies with photometric redshifts between z ~ 6 to z ~ 8, including extremely bright objects with H-band magnitudes of m_AB ~ 23 mag. As a sample, the observed (lensed) magnitudes of these galaxies are among the brightest known at z> 6, comparable to much wider, blank-field surveys. RELICS demonstrates the efficiency of using strong gravitational lenses to produce high-redshift samples in the epoch of reionization. These brightly observed galaxies are excellent targets for follow-up study with current and future observatories, including the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters magnifies background galaxies, enhancing our ability to discover statistically significant samples of galaxies at z>6, in order to constrain the high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions. Here, we present the first five lens models out of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble Treasury Program, based on new HST WFC3/IR and ACS imaging of the clusters RXC J0142.9+4438, Abell 2537, Abell 2163, RXC J2211.7-0349, and ACT-CLJ0102-49151. The derived lensing magnification is essential for estimating the intrinsic properties of high-redshift galaxy candidates, and properly accounting for the survey volume. We report on new spectroscopic redshifts of multiply imaged lensed galaxies behind these clusters, which are used as constraints, and detail our strategy to reduce systematic uncertainties due to lack of spectroscopic information. In addition, we quantify the uncertainty on the lensing magnification due to statistical and systematic errors related to the lens modeling process, and find that in all but one cluster, the magnification is constrained to better than 20% in at least 80% of the field of view, including statistical and systematic uncertainties. The five clusters presented in this paper span the range of masses and redshifts of the clusters in the RELICS program. We find that they exhibit similar strong lensing efficiencies to the clusters targeted by the Hubble Frontier Fields within the WFC3/IR field of view. Outputs of the lens models are made available to the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes
  • The most distant galaxies known are at z~10-11, observed 400-500 Myr after the Big Bang. The few z~10-11 candidates discovered to date have been exceptionally small- barely resolved, if at all, by the Hubble Space Telescope. Here we present the discovery of SPT0615-JD, a fortuitous z~10 (z_phot=9.9+/-0.6) galaxy candidate stretched into an arc over ~2.5" by the effects of strong gravitational lensing. Discovered in the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble Treasury program and companion S-RELICS Spitzer program, this candidate has a lensed H-band magnitude of 25.7+/-0.1 AB mag. With a magnification of \mu~4-7 estimated from our lens models, the de-lensed intrinsic magnitude is 27.6+/-0.3 AB mag, and the half-light radius is r_e<0.8 kpc, both consistent with other z>9 candidates. The inferred stellar mass (log [M* /M_Sun]=9.7^{+0.7}_{-0.5}) and star formation rate (\log [SFR/M_Sun yr^{-1}]=1.3^{+0.2}_{-0.3}) indicate that this candidate is a typical star-forming galaxy on the z>6 SFR-M* relation. We note that three independent lens models predict two counterimages, at least one of which should be of a similar magnitude to the arc, but these counterimages are not yet detected. Counterimages would not be expected if the arc were at lower redshift. However, the only spectral energy distributions capable of fitting the Hubble and Spitzer photometry well at lower redshifts require unphysical combinations of z~2 galaxy properties. The unprecedented lensed size of this z~10 candidate offers the potential for the James Webb Space Telescope to study the geometric and kinematic properties of a galaxy observed 500 Myr after the Big Bang.
  • We present an analysis of 15 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshift z > 1 (9 at 1.5 < z < 2.3) recently discovered in the CANDELS and CLASH Multi-Cycle Treasury programs using WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We combine these SNe Ia with a new compilation of 1050 SNe Ia, jointly calibrated and corrected for simulated survey biases to produce accurate distance measurements. We present unbiased constraints on the expansion rate at six redshifts in the range 0.07 < z < 1.5 based only on this combined SN Ia sample. The added leverage of our new sample at z > 1.5 leads to a factor of ~3 improvement in the determination of the expansion rate at z = 1.5, reducing its uncertainty to ~20%, a measurement of H(z=1.5)/H0=2.67 (+0.83,-0.52). We then demonstrate that these six measurements alone provide a nearly identical characterization of dark energy as the full SN sample, making them an efficient compression of the SN Ia data. The new sample of SNe Ia at z > 1 usefully distinguishes between alternative cosmological models and unmodeled evolution of the SN Ia distance indicators, placing empirical limits on the latter. Finally, employing a realistic simulation of a potential WFIRST SN survey observing strategy, we forecast optimistic future constraints on the expansion rate from SNe Ia.
  • Using the power of gravitational lensing magnification by massive galaxy clusters, the Hubble Frontier Fields provide deep views of six patches of the high redshift Universe. The combination of deep Hubble imaging and exceptional lensing strength has revealed the greatest numbers of multiply-imaged galaxies available to constrain models of cluster mass distributions. However, even with $\mathcal{O}(100)$ images per cluster, the uncertainties associated with the reconstructions are not negligible. The goal of this paper is to show the diversity of model magnification predictions. We examine 7 and 9 mass models of Abell 2744 and MACS J0416, respectively, submitted to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes for public distribution in September 2015. The dispersion between model predictions increases from 30% at common low magnifications ($\mu\sim2$) to 70% at rare high magnifications ($\mu\sim40$). MACS J0416 exhibits smaller dispersions than Abell 2744 for $2<\mu<10$. We show that magnification maps based on different lens inversion techniques typically differ from each other by more than their quoted statistical errors. This suggests that some models underestimate the true uncertainties, which are primarily due to various lensing degeneracies. Though the exact mass sheet degeneracy is broken, its generalized counterpart is not broken at least in Abell 2744. Other, local degeneracies are also present in both clusters. Our comparison of models is complementary to the comparison of reconstructions of known synthetic mass distributions. By focusing on observed clusters, we can identify those that are best constrained, and therefore provide the clearest view of the distant Universe.
  • We present two supernovae (SNe) discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), an HST multi-cycle treasury program. We classify both objects as Type Ia SNe and find redshifts of z = 1.80+-0.02 and 2.26 +0.02 -0.10, the latter of which is the highest redshift Type Ia SN yet seen. Using light curve fitting we determine luminosity distances and find that both objects are consistent with a standard Lambda-CDM cosmological model. These SNe were observed using the HST Wide Field Camera 3 infrared detector (WFC3-IR), with imaging in both wide- and medium-band filters. We demonstrate that the classification and redshift estimates are significantly improved by the inclusion of single-epoch medium-band observations. This medium-band imaging approximates a very low resolution spectrum (lambda/delta lambda ~ 100) which can isolate broad spectral absorption features that differentiate Type Ia SNe from their most common core collapse cousins. This medium-band method is also insensitive to dust extinction and (unlike grism spectroscopy) it is not affected by contamination from the SN host galaxy or other nearby sources. As such, it can provide a more efficient - though less precise - alternative to IR spectroscopy for high-z SNe.
  • The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) multi-cycle treasury programs with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have provided new opportunities to probe the rate of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) at high redshift, now extending to $z\approx2.5$. Here we use a sample of approximately 44 CCSNe to determine volumetric rates, $R_{CC}$, in six redshift bins in the range $0.1<z<2.5$. Together with rates from our previous HST program, and rates from the literature, we trace a more complete history of $R_{CC}(z)$, with $R_{CC}=0.72\pm0.06$ yr$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ 10$^{-4}$ $h_{70}^{3}$ at $z<0.08$, and increasing to $3.7^{+3.1}_{-1.6}$ yr$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ 10$^{-4}$ $h_{70}^{3}$ to $z\approx2.0$. The statistical precision in each bin is several factors better than than the systematic error, with significant contributions from host extinction, and average peak absolute magnitudes of the assumed luminosity functions for CCSN types. Assuming negligible time delays from stellar formation to explosion, we find these composite CCSN rates to be in excellent agreement with cosmic star formation rate density (SFRs) derived largely from dust-corrected rest-frame UV emission, with a scaling factor of $k=0.0091\pm0.0017\,M^{-1}_{\odot}$, and inconsistent (to $>95\%$ confidence) with SFRs from IR luminous galaxies, or with SFR models that include simple evolution in the initial mass function over time. This scaling factor is expected if the fraction of the IMF contributing to CCSN progenitors is in the 8 to 50 $M_{\odot}$ range. It is not supportive, however, of an upper mass limit for progenitors at $<20\,M_{\odot}$.
  • SN HFF14Tom is a Type Ia Supernova (SN) discovered at z = 1.3457 +- 0.0001 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). In a cosmology-independent analysis, we find that HFF14Tom is 0.77 +- 0.15 magnitudes brighter than unlensed Type Ia SNe at similar redshift, implying a lensing magnification of mu_obs = 2.03 +- 0.29. This observed magnification provides a rare opportunity for a direct empirical test of galaxy cluster lens models. Here we test 17 lens models, 13 of which were generated before the SN magnification was known, qualifying as pure "blind tests". The models are collectively fairly accurate: 8 of the models deliver median magnifications that are consistent with the measured mu to within 1-sigma. However, there is a subtle systematic bias: the significant disagreements all involve models overpredicting the magnification. We evaluate possible causes for this mild bias, and find no single physical or methodological explanation to account for it. We do find that model accuracy can be improved to some extent with stringent quality cuts on multiply-imaged systems, such as requiring that a large fraction have spectroscopic redshifts. In addition to testing model accuracies as we have done here, Type Ia SN magnifications could also be used as inputs for future lens models of Abell 2744 and other clusters, providing valuable constraints in regions where traditional strong- and weak-lensing information is unavailable.
  • The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) was a multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that surveyed a total area of ~0.25 deg^2 with ~900 HST orbits spread across 5 fields over 3 years. Within these survey images we discovered 65 supernovae (SN) of all types, out to z~2.5. We classify ~24 of these as Type Ia SN (SN Ia) based on host-galaxy redshifts and SN photometry (supplemented by grism spectroscopy of 6 SN). Here we present a measurement of the volumetric SN Ia rate as a function of redshift, reaching for the first time beyond z=2 and putting new constraints on SN Ia progenitor models. Our highest redshift bin includes detections of SN that exploded when the universe was only ~3 Gyr old and near the peak of the cosmic star-formation history. This gives the CANDELS high-redshift sample unique leverage for evaluating the fraction of SN Ia that explode promptly after formation (<500 Myr). Combining the CANDELS rates with all available SN Ia rate measurements in the literature we find that this prompt SN Ia fraction is fP=0.53 +0.09 -0.10 (stat) +0.10 -0.26 (sys), consistent with a delay time distribution that follows a simple t^{-1} power law for all times t>40 Myr. However, a mild tension is apparent between ground-based low-z surveys and space-based high-z surveys. In both CANDELS and the sister HST program CLASH, we find a low rate of SN Ia at z>1. This could be a hint that prompt progenitors are in fact relatively rare, accounting for only ~20% of all SN Ia explosions -- though further analysis and larger samples will be needed to examine that suggestion.
  • We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and Abell 383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was approximately 1.0 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is approximately 0.2 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak lensing maps of the clusters: 0.83 +/- 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 +/- 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 +/- 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.
  • Aims. We investigate the degree of improvement in dark energy constraints that can be achieved by extending Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) samples to redshifts z > 1.5 with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), particularly in the ongoing CANDELS and CLASH multi-cycle treasury programs. Methods. Using the popular CPL parametrization of the dark energy, w = w0 +wa(1-a), we generate mock SN Ia samples that can be projected out to higher redshifts. The synthetic datasets thus generated are fitted to the CPL model, and we evaluate the improvement that a high-z sample can add in terms of ameliorating the statistical and systematic uncertainties on cosmological parameters. Results. In an optimistic but still very achievable scenario, we find that extending the HST sample beyond CANDELS+CLASH to reach a total of 28 SN Ia at z > 1.0 could improve the uncertainty in the wa parameter by up to 21%. The corresponding improvement in the figure of merit (FoM) would be as high as 28%. Finally, we consider the use of high-redshift SN Ia samples to detect non-cosmological evolution in SN Ia luminosities with redshift, finding that such tests could be undertaken by future spacebased infrared surveys using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).
  • Past analyses of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) have identified an irreducible scatter of 5-10% in distance widely attributed to an intrinsic dispersion in luminosity. Another, equally valid, source of this scatter is intrinsic dispersion in color. Misidentification of the true source of this scatter can bias both the retrieved color-luminosity relation and cosmological parameter measurements. The size of this bias depends on the magnitude of the intrinsic color dispersion relative to the distribution of colors that correlate with distance. We produce a realistic simulation of a misattribution of intrinsic scatter, and find a negative bias in the recovered color-luminosity relation, beta, of dbeta -1.0 (~33%) and a positive bias in the equation of state parameter, w, of dw +0.04 (~4%). We re-analyze current published data sets with the assumptions that the distance scatter is predominantly the result of color. Unlike previous analyses, we find that the data are consistent with a Milky Way reddening law R_V=3.1, and that a Milky Way dust model better predicts the asymmetric color-luminosity trends than the conventional luminosity scatter hypothesis. We also determine that accounting for color variation reduces the correlation between various Host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals by ~20%.
  • We present the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN) at redshift $z = 1.914$ from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program on the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope (HST)}. This SN was discovered in the infrared using the Wide-Field Camera 3, and it is the highest-redshift Type Ia SN yet observed. We classify this object as a SN\,Ia by comparing its light curve and spectrum with those of a large sample of Type Ia and core-collapse supernovae (SNe). Its apparent magnitude is consistent with that expected from the $\Lambda$CDM concordance cosmology. We discuss the use of spectral evidence for classification of $z > 1.5$ SNe\,Ia using {\it HST} grism simulations, finding that spectral data alone can frequently rule out SNe\,II, but distinguishing between SNe\,Ia and SNe\,Ib/c can require prohibitively long exposures. In such cases, a quantitative analysis of the light curve may be necessary for classification. Our photometric and spectroscopic classification methods can aid the determination of SN rates and cosmological parameters from the full high-redshift CANDELS SN sample.
  • We present a candidate for the most distant galaxy known to date with a photometric redshift z = 10.7 +0.6 / -0.4 (95% confidence limits; with z < 9.5 galaxies of known types ruled out at 7.2-sigma). This J-dropout Lyman Break Galaxy, named MACS0647-JD, was discovered as part of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). We observe three magnified images of this galaxy due to strong gravitational lensing by the galaxy cluster MACSJ0647.7+7015 at z = 0.591. The images are magnified by factors of ~8, 7, and 2, with the brighter two observed at ~26th magnitude AB (~0.15 uJy) in the WFC3/IR F160W filter (~1.4 - 1.7 um) where they are detected at >~ 12-sigma. All three images are also confidently detected at >~ 6-sigma in F140W (~1.2 - 1.6 um), dropping out of detection from 15 lower wavelength HST filters (~0.2 - 1.4 um), and lacking bright detections in Spitzer/IRAC 3.6um and 4.5um imaging (~3.2 - 5.0 um). We rule out a broad range of possible lower redshift interlopers, including some previously published as high redshift candidates. Our high redshift conclusion is more conservative than if we had neglected a Bayesian photometric redshift prior. Given CLASH observations of 17 high mass clusters to date, our discoveries of MACS0647-JD at z ~ 10.8 and MACS1149-JD1 at z ~ 9.6 are consistent with a lensed luminosity function extrapolated from lower redshifts. This would suggest that low luminosity galaxies could have reionized the universe. However given the significant uncertainties based on only two galaxies, we cannot yet rule out the sharp drop off in number counts at z >~ 10 suggested by field searches.
  • We present VLT/X-shooter observations of a high redshift, type Ia supernova host galaxy, discovered with HST/WFC3 as part of the CANDELS Supernova project. The galaxy exhibits strong emission lines of Ly{\alpha}, [O II], H{\beta}, [O III], and H{\alpha} at z = 1.54992(+0.00008-0.00004). From the emission-line fluxes and SED fitting of broad-band photometry we rule out AGN activity and characterize the host galaxy as a young, low mass, metal poor, starburst galaxy with low intrinsic extinction and high Ly{\alpha} escape fraction. The host galaxy stands out in terms of the star formation, stellar mass, and metallicity compared to its lower redshift counterparts, mainly because of its high specific star-formation rate. If valid for a larger sample of high-redshift SN Ia host galaxies, such changes in the host galaxy properties with redshift are of interest because of the potential impact on the use of SN Ia as standard candles in cosmology.
  • We report the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SNIa) at redshift z=1.55 with the infrared detector of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3-IR) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This object was discovered in CANDELS imaging data of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, and followed as part of the CANDELS+CLASH Supernova project, comprising the SN search components from those two HST multi-cycle treasury programs. This is the highest redshift SNIa with direct spectroscopic evidence for classification. It is also the first SN Ia at z>1 found and followed in the infrared, providing a full light curve in rest-frame optical bands. The classification and redshift are securely defined from a combination of multi-band and multi-epoch photometry of the SN, ground-based spectroscopy of the host galaxy, and WFC3-IR grism spectroscopy of both the SN and host. This object is the first of a projected sample at z>1.5 that will be discovered by the CANDELS and CLASH programs. The full CANDELS+CLASH SN Ia sample will enable unique tests for evolutionary effects that could arise due to differences in SN Ia progenitor systems as a function of redshift. This high-z sample will also allow measurement of the SN Ia rate out to z~2, providing a complementary constraint on SN Ia progenitor models.
  • Norman A. Grogin, Dale D. Kocevski, S. M. Faber, Henry C. Ferguson, Anton M. Koekemoer, Adam G. Riess, Viviana Acquaviva, David M. Alexander, Omar Almaini, Matthew L. N. Ashby, Marco Barden, Eric F. Bell, Frédéric Bournaud, Thomas M. Brown, Karina I. Caputi, Stefano Casertano, Paolo Cassata, Marco Castellano, Peter Challis, Ranga-Ram Chary, Edmond Cheung, Michele Cirasuolo, Christopher J. Conselice, Asantha Roshan Cooray, Darren J. Croton, Emanuele Daddi, Tomas Dahlen, Romeel Davé, Duília F. de Mello, Avishai Dekel, Mark Dickinson, Timothy Dolch, Jennifer L. Donley, James S. Dunlop, Aaron A. Dutton, David Elbaz, Giovanni G. Fazio, Alexei V. Filippenko, Steven L. Finkelstein, Adriano Fontana, Jonathan P. Gardner, Peter M. Garnavich, Eric Gawiser, Mauro Giavalisco, Andrea Grazian, Yicheng Guo, Nimish P. Hathi, Boris Häussler, Philip F. Hopkins, Jia-Sheng Huang, Kuang-Han Huang, Saurabh W. Jha, Jeyhan S. Kartaltepe, Robert P. Kirshner, David C. Koo, Kamson Lai, Kyoung-Soo Lee, Weidong Li, Jennifer M. Lotz, Ray A. Lucas, Piero Madau, Patrick J. McCarthy, Elizabeth J. McGrath, Daniel H. McIntosh, Ross J. McLure, Bahram Mobasher, Leonidas A. Moustakas, Mark Mozena, Kirpal Nandra, Jeffrey A. Newman, Sami-Matias Niemi, Kai G. Noeske, Casey J. Papovich, Laura Pentericci, Alexandra Pope, Joel R. Primack, Abhijith Rajan, Swara Ravindranath, Naveen A. Reddy, Alvio Renzini, Hans-Walter Rix, Aday R. Robaina, Steven A. Rodney, David J. Rosario, Piero Rosati, Sara Salimbeni, Claudia Scarlata, Brian Siana, Luc Simard, Joseph Smidt, Rachel S. Somerville, Hyron Spinrad, Amber N. Straughn, Louis-Gregory Strolger, Olivia Telford, Harry I. Teplitz, Jonathan R. Trump, Arjen van der Wel, Carolin Villforth, Risa H. Wechsler, Benjamin J. Weiner, Tommy Wiklind, Vivienne Wild, Grant Wilson, Stijn Wuyts, Hao-Jing Yan, Min S. Yun
    Oct. 19, 2011 astro-ph.CO
    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) is designed to document the first third of galactic evolution, over the approximate redshift (z) range 8--1.5. It will image >250,000 distant galaxies using three separate cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope, from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared, and will find and measure Type Ia supernovae at z>1.5 to test their accuracy as standardizable candles for cosmology. Five premier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected, each with extensive ancillary data. The use of five widely separated fields mitigates cosmic variance and yields statistically robust and complete samples of galaxies down to a stellar mass of 10^9 M_\odot to z \approx 2, reaching the knee of the ultraviolet luminosity function (UVLF) of galaxies to z \approx 8. The survey covers approximately 800 arcmin^2 and is divided into two parts. The CANDELS/Deep survey (5\sigma\ point-source limit H=27.7 mag) covers \sim 125 arcmin^2 within GOODS-N and GOODS-S. The CANDELS/Wide survey includes GOODS and three additional fields (EGS, COSMOS, and UDS) and covers the full area to a 5\sigma\ point-source limit of H \gtrsim 27.0 mag. Together with the Hubble Ultra Deep Fields, the strategy creates a three-tiered "wedding cake" approach that has proven efficient for extragalactic surveys. Data from the survey are nonproprietary and are useful for a wide variety of science investigations. In this paper, we describe the basic motivations for the survey, the CANDELS team science goals and the resulting observational requirements, the field selection and geometry, and the observing design. The Hubble data processing and products are described in a companion paper.
  • We report results from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge (SNPCC), a publicly released mix of simulated supernovae (SNe), with types (Ia, Ibc, and II) selected in proportion to their expected rate. The simulation was realized in the griz filters of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with realistic observing conditions (sky noise, point-spread function and atmospheric transparency) based on years of recorded conditions at the DES site. Simulations of non-Ia type SNe are based on spectroscopically confirmed light curves that include unpublished non-Ia samples donated from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP), the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II). A spectroscopically confirmed subset was provided for training. We challenged scientists to run their classification algorithms and report a type and photo-z for each SN. Participants from 10 groups contributed 13 entries for the sample that included a host-galaxy photo-z for each SN, and 9 entries for the sample that had no redshift information. Several different classification strategies resulted in similar performance, and for all entries the performance was significantly better for the training subset than for the unconfirmed sample. For the spectroscopically unconfirmed subset, the entry with the highest average figure of merit for classifying SNe~Ia has an efficiency of 0.96 and an SN~Ia purity of 0.79. As a public resource for the future development of photometric SN classification and photo-z estimators, we have released updated simulations with improvements based on our experience from the SNPCC, added samples corresponding to the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the SDSS, and provided the answer keys so that developers can evaluate their own analysis.
  • The IfA Deep survey uncovered ~130 thermonuclear supernovae (TNSNe, i.e. Type Ia) candidates at redshifts from z=0.1 out to beyond z=1. The TNSN explosion rates derived from these data have been controversial, conflicting with evidence emerging from other surveys. This work revisits the IfA Deep survey to re-evaluate the photometric evidence. Applying the SOFT program to the light curves of all SN candidates, we derive new classification grades and redshift estimates. We find a volumetric rate for z~0.5 that is substantially smaller than the originally published values, bringing the revised IfA Deep rate into good agreement with other surveys. With our improved photometric analysis techniques, we are able to confidently extend the rate measurements to higher redshifts, and we find a steadily increasing TNSN rate, with no indication of a peak out to z=1.05.
  • We present deep 3.6 cm radio continuum observations of the HII region W40 obtained using the Very Large Array in its A and B configurations. We detect a total of 20 compact radio sources in a region of 4 x 4 arcmin, with 11 of them concentrated in a band with 30 arcsec of extent. We also present JHK photometry of the W40 cluster taken with the QUIRC instrument on the University of Hawaii 2.2 meter telescope. These data reveal that 15 of the 20 VLA sources have infrared counterparts, and 10 show radio variability with periods less than 20 days. Based on these combined radio and IR data, we propose that 8 of the radio sources are candidate ultracompact HII regions, 7 are likely to be young stellar objects, and 2 may be shocked interstellar gas.
  • Wide field surveys will soon be discovering Type Ia supernovae (SNe) at rates of several thousand per year. Spectroscopic follow-up can only scratch the surface for such enormous samples, so these extensive data sets will only be useful to the extent that they can be characterized by the survey photometry alone. In a companion paper (Rodney and Tonry, 2009) we introduced the SOFT method for analyzing SNe using direct comparison to template light curves, and demonstrated its application for photometric SN classification. In this work we extend the SOFT method to derive estimates of redshift and luminosity distance for Type Ia SNe, using light curves from the SDSS and SNLS surveys as a validation set. Redshifts determined by SOFT using light curves alone are consistent with spectroscopic redshifts, showing a root-mean-square scatter in the residuals of RMS_z=0.051. SOFT can also derive simultaneous redshift and distance estimates, yielding results that are consistent with the currently favored Lambda-CDM cosmological model. When SOFT is given spectroscopic information for SN classification and redshift priors, the RMS scatter in Hubble diagram residuals is 0.18 mags for the SDSS data and 0.28 mags for the SNLS objects. Without access to any spectroscopic information, and even without any redshift priors from host galaxy photometry, SOFT can still measure reliable redshifts and distances, with an increase in the Hubble residuals to 0.37 mags for the combined SDSS and SNLS data set. Using Monte Carlo simulations we predict that SOFT will be able to improve constraints on time-variable dark energy models by a factor of 2-3 with each new generation of large-scale SN surveys.
  • Modern supernova (SN) surveys are now uncovering stellar explosions at rates that far surpass what the world's spectroscopic resources can handle. In order to make full use of these SN datasets, it is necessary to use analysis methods that depend only on the survey photometry. This paper presents two methods for utilizing a set of SN light curve templates to classify SN objects. In the first case we present an updated version of the Bayesian Adaptive Template Matching program (BATM). To address some shortcomings of that strictly Bayesian approach, we introduce a method for Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT), which utilizes Fuzzy Set Theory for the definition and combination of SN light curve models. For well-sampled light curves with a modest signal to noise ratio (S/N>10), the SOFT method can correctly separate thermonuclear (Type Ia) SNe from core collapse SNe with 98% accuracy. In addition, the SOFT method has the potential to classify supernovae into sub-types, providing photometric identification of very rare or peculiar explosions. The accuracy and precision of the SOFT method is verified using Monte Carlo simulations as well as real SN light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the SuperNova Legacy Survey. In a subsequent paper the SOFT method is extended to address the problem of parameter estimation, providing estimates of redshift, distance, and host galaxy extinction without any spectroscopy.
  • The W40 complex is a nearby site of recent massive star formation composed of a dense molecular cloud adjacent to an HII region that contains an embedded OB star cluster. The HII region is beginning to blister out and break free from its envelope of molecular gas, but our line of sight to the central stars is largely obscured by intervening dust. Several bright OB stars in W40 - visible at optical, infrared, or cm wavelengths - are providing the ionizing flux that heats the HII region. The known stellar component of W40 is dominated by a small number of partly or fully embedded OB stars which have been studied at various wavelengths, but the lower mass stellar population remains largely unexamined. Despite its modest optical appearance, at 600pc W40 is one of the nearest massive star forming regions, and with a UV flux of about 1/10th of the Orion Nebula Cluster, this neglected region deserves detailed investigation.
  • We observed the young open cluster NGC 2301 for 14 nights in Feb. 2004 using the orthogonal transfer CCD camera (OPTIC). We used PSF shaping techniques ("square stars") during the observations allowing a larger dynamic range (4.5 magnitudes) of high photometric precision results ($\le$2 mmag) to be obtained. These results are better than similar observing campaigns using standard CCD imagers. This paper discusses our observational techniques and presents initial results for the variability statistics found in NGC 2301. Details of the variability statistics as functions of color, variability type, stellar type, and cluster location will appear in paper II.