• It is shown that the tessellation of a compact, hyperbolic surface induced by a typical long geodesic segment, when properly scaled, looks locally like a Poisson line process. This implies that the global statistics of the tessellation -- for instance, the fraction of triangles -- approach those of the limiting Poisson line process.
  • Voters making a binary decision purchase votes from a centralized clearing house, paying the square of the number of votes purchased. The net payoff to an agent with utility $u$ who purchases $v$ votes is $\Psi (S_{n+1})u-v^{2}$, where $\Psi$ is a monotone function taking values between -1 and +1 and $S_{n+1}$ is the sum of all votes purchased by the $n+1$ voters participating in the election. The utilities of the voters are assumed to arise by random sampling from a probability distribution $F_{U}$ with compact support; each voter knows her own utility, but not those of the other voters, although she does know the sampling distribution $F_{U}$. Nash equilibria for this game are described. These results imply that the expected inefficiency of any Nash equilibrium decays like $1/n$.
  • We obtain sharp asymptotic estimates for hitting probabilities of a critical branching Brownian motion in one dimension with killing at 0 We also obtain sharp asymptotic formulas for the tail probabilities of the number of particles killed at 0. In the special case of double-or-nothing branching, we give exact formulas for both the hitting probabilities, in terms of elliptic functions, and the distribution of the number of killed particles.
  • We consider a branching random walk initiated by a single particle at location 0 in which particles alternately reproduce according to the law of a Galton-Watson process and disperse according to the law of a driftless random walk on the integers. When the offspring distribution has mean 1 the branching process is critical, and therefore dies out with probability 1. We prove that if the particle jump distribution has mean zero, positive finite variance $\eta^{2}$, and finite $4+\varepsilon$ moment, and if the offspring distribution has positive variance $\sigma^{2}$ and finite third moment then the distribution of the rightmost position $M$ reached by a particle of the branching random walk satisfies $P\{M \geq x\}\sim 6\eta^{2}/ (\sigma^{2}x^{2})$ as $x \rightarrow \infty$. We also prove a conditional limit theorem for the distribution of the rightmost particle location at time $n$ given that the process survives for $n$ generations.
  • We consider measure-valued processes $X=(X_t)$ that solve the following martingale problem: for a given initial measure $X_0$, and for all smooth, compactly supported test functions $\varphi$, \begin{eqnarray*}X_t(\varphi )=X_0(\varphi)+\frac{1}{2}\int _0^tX_s(\Delta \varphi )\,ds+\theta \int_0^tX_s(\varphi )\,ds\\{}-\int_0^tX_s(L_s\varphi )\,ds+M_t(\varphi ).\end{eqnarray*} Here $L_s(x)$ is the local time density process associated with $X$, and $M_t(\varphi )$ is a martingale with quadratic variation $[M(\varphi )]_t=\int_0^tX_s(\varphi ^2)\,ds$. Such processes arise as scaling limits of SIR epidemic models. We show that there exist critical values $\theta_c(d)\in(0,\infty)$ for dimensions $d=2,3$ such that if $\theta>\theta_c(d)$, then the solution survives forever with positive probability, but if $\theta<\theta_c(d)$, then the solution dies out in finite time with probability 1. For $d=1$ we prove that the solution dies out almost surely for all values of $\theta$. We also show that in dimensions $d=2,3$ the process dies out locally almost surely for any value of $\theta$; that is, for any compact set $K$, the process $X_t(K)=0$ eventually.
  • Any exchangeable Markov processes on $[k]^{\mathbb{N}}$ with cadlag sample paths projects to a Markov process on the simplex whose sample paths are cadlag and of locally bounded variation. Furthermore, any such process has a de Finetti-type description as a mixture of i.i.d. copies of time-inhomogeneous Markov processes on $[k]$. In the Feller case, these time-inhomogeneous Markov processes have a relatively simple structure; however, in the non-Feller case a greater variety of behaviors is possible since the transition law of the underlying Markov process on $[k]^{\zz{N}}$ can depend in a non-trivial way on the exchangeable $\sigma$-algebra of the process.
  • We consider a critical continuous-time branching process (a Yule process) in which the individuals independently execute symmetric $\alpha-$stable random motions on the real line starting at their birth points. Because the branching process is critical, it will eventually die out, and so there is a well-defined maximal location $M$ ever visited by an individual particle of the process. We prove that the distribution of $M$ satisfies the asymptotic relation $P\{M\geq x \}\sim (2/\alpha)^{1/2}x^{-\alpha /2}$ as $x \rightarrow \infty$.
  • Let $\Upsilon $ be a compact, negatively curved surface. From the (finite) set of all closed geodesics on $\Upsilon$ of length $\leq L$, choose one, say $\gamma_{L}$, at random and let $N (\gamma_{L})$ be the number of its self-intersections. It is known that there is a positive constant $\kappa$ depending on the metric such that $N (\gamma_{L})/L^{2} \rightarrow \kappa$ in probability as $L\rightarrow \infty$. The main results of this paper concern the size of typical fluctuations of $N (\gamma_{L})$ about $\kappa L^{2}$. It is proved that if the metric has constant curvature -1 then typical fluctuations are of order $L$, in particular, $(N (\gamma_{L})-\kappa L^{2})/L$ converges weakly to a nondegenerate probability distribution. In contrast, it is also proved that if the metric has variable negative curvature then fluctuations of $N (\gamma_{L})$ are of order $L^{3/2}$, in particular, $(N (\gamma_{L})-\kappa L^{2})/L^{3/2}$ converges weakly to a Gaussian distribution. Similar results are proved for generic geodesics, that is, geodesics whose initial tangent vectors are chosen randomly according to normalized Liouville measure.
  • We study the convergence rate to stationarity for a class of exchangeable partition-valued Markov chains called cut-and-paste chains. The law governing the transitions of a cut-and-paste chain are determined by products of i.i.d. stochastic matrices, which describe the chain induced on the simplex by taking asymptotic frequencies. Using this representation, we establish upper bounds for the mixing times of ergodic cut-and-paste chains, and under certain conditions on the distribution of the governing random matrices we show that the "cutoff phenomenon" holds.
  • It is proved that the Green's function of a symmetric finite range random walk on a co-compact Fuchsian group decays exponentially in distance at the radius of convergence R. It is also shown that Ancona's inequalities extend to R, and therefore that the Martin boundary for R-potentials coincides with the natural geometric boundary S^1, and that the Martin kernel is uniformly H\"older continuous. Finally, it is proved that this implies a local limit theorem for the transition probabilities.
  • Oriented closed curves on an orientable surface with boundary are described up to continuous deformation by reduced cyclic words in the generators of the fundamental group and their inverses. By self-intersection number one means the minimum number of transversal self-intersection points of representatives of the class. We prove that if a class is chosen at random from among all classes of $m$ letters, then for large $m$ the distribution of the self-intersection number approaches the Gaussian distribution.
  • It is proved that the Green's function of the simple random walk on a surface group of large genus decays exponentially at the spectral radius. It is also shown that Ancona's inequalities extend to the spectral radius R, and therefore that the Martin boundary for R-potentials coincides with the natural geometric boundary S^1. This implies that the Green's function obeys a power law with exponent 1/2 at the spectral radius.
  • We study the fluctuations of self-intersection counts of random geodesic segments of length $t$ on a compact, negatively curved surface in the limit of large $t$. If the initial direction vector of the geodesic is chosen according to the \emph{Liouville measure}, then it is not difficult to show that the number $N (t)$ of self-intersections by time $t$ grows like $\kappa t^{2}$, where $\kappa =\kappa_{M}$ is a positive constant depending on the surface $M$. We show that (for a smooth modification of $N (t)$) the fluctuations are of size $t$, and the limit distribution is a weak limit of Gaussian quadratic forms. We also show that the fluctuations of \emph{localized} self-intersection counts (that is, only self-intersections in a fixed subset of $M$ are counted) are typically of size $t^{3/2}$, and the limit distribution is Gaussian.
  • The behavior at criticality of spatial SIR (susceptible/infected/recovered) epidemic models in dimensions two and three is investigated. In these models, finite populations of size N are situated at the vertices of the integer lattice, and infectious contacts are limited to individuals at the same or at neighboring sites. Susceptible individuals, once infected, remain contagious for one unit of time and then recover, after which they are immune to further infection. It is shown that the measure-valued processes associated with these epidemics, suitably scaled, converge, in the large-N limit, either to a standard Dawson-Watanabe process (super-Brownian motion) or to a Dawson-Watanabe process with location-dependent killing, depending on the size of the the initially infected set. A key element of the argument is a proof of Adler's 1993 conjecture that the local time processes associated with branching random walks converge to the local time density process associated with the limiting super-Brownian motion.
  • In the simple mean-field SIS and SIR epidemic models, infection is transmitted from infectious to susceptible members of a finite population by independent $p-$coin tosses. Spatial variants of these models are proposed, in which finite populations of size $N$ are situated at the sites of a lattice and infectious contacts are limited to individuals at neighboring sites. Scaling laws for both the mean-field and spatial models are given when the infection parameter $p$ is such that the epidemics are critical. It is shown that in all cases there is a critical threshold for the numbers initially infected: below the threshold, the epidemic evolves in essentially the same manner as its branching envelope, but at the threshold evolves like a branching process with a size-dependent drift.
  • In the simple mean-field SIS and SIR epidemic models, infection is transmitted from infectious to susceptible members of a finite population by independent p-coin tosses. Spatial variants of these models are proposed, in which finite populations of size N are situated at the sites of a lattice and infectious contacts are limited to individuals at neighboring sites. Scaling laws for these models are given when the infection parameter p is such that the epidemics are critical. It is shown that in all cases there is a critical threshold for the numbers initially infected: below the threshold, the epidemic evolves in essentially the same manner as its branching envelope, but at the threshold evolves like a branching process with a size-dependent drift. The corresponding scaling limits are super-Brownian motions and Dawson-Watanabe processes with killing, respectively.
  • When do nonparametric Bayesian procedures ``overfit''? To shed light on this question, we consider a binary regression problem in detail and establish frequentist consistency for a certain class of Bayes procedures based on hierarchical priors, called uniform mixture priors. These are defined as follows: let $\nu$ be any probability distribution on the nonnegative integers. To sample a function $f$ from the prior $\pi^{\nu}$, first sample $m$ from $\nu$ and then sample $f$ uniformly from the set of step functions from $[0,1]$ into $[0,1]$ that have exactly $m$ jumps (i.e., sample all $m$ jump locations and $m+1$ function values independently and uniformly). The main result states that if a data-stream is generated according to any fixed, measurable binary-regression function $f_0\not\equiv1/2$, then frequentist consistency obtains: that is, for any $\nu$ with infinite support, the posterior of $\pi^{\nu}$ concentrates on any $L^1$ neighborhood of $f_0$. Solution of an associated large-deviations problem is central to the consistency proof.
  • This paper is concerned with the problem of recovering a finite, deterministic time series from observations that are corrupted by additive, independent noise. A distinctive feature of this problem is that the available data exhibit long-range dependence and, as a consequence, existing statistical theory and methods are not readily applicable. This paper gives an analysis of the denoising problem that extends recent work of Lalley, but begins from first principles. Both positive and negative results are established. The positive results show that denoising is possible under somewhat restrictive conditions on the additive noise. The negative results show that, under more general conditions on the noise, no procedure can recover the underlying deterministic series.
  • The Northeast Model is a spin system on the two-dimensional integer lattice that evolves according to the following rule: Whenever a site's southerly and westerly nearest neighbors have spin $1$, it may reset its own spin by tossing a $p$-coin; at all other times, its spin remains frozen. It is proved that the northeast model has a phase transition at $p_{c}=1-\beta_{c}$, where $\beta_{c}$ is the critical parameter for oriented percolation. For $p<p_{c}$, the trivial measure $\delta_{0}$ that puts mass one on the configuration with all spins set at $0$ is the unique ergodic, translation invariant, stationary measure. For $p\geq p_{c}$, the product Bernoulli-$p$ measure on configuration space is the unique nontrivial, ergodic, translation invariant, stationary measure for the system, and it is mixing. For $p>2/3$ it is shown that there is exponential decay of correlations.
  • We consider a two-type stochastic competition model on the integer lattice Z^d. The model describes the space evolution of two ``species'' competing for territory along their boundaries. Each site of the space may contain only one representative (also referred to as a particle) of either type. The spread mechanism for both species is the same: each particle produces offspring independently of other particles and can place them only at the neighboring sites that are either unoccupied, or occupied by particles of the opposite type. In the second case, the old particle is killed by the newborn. The rate of birth for each particle is equal to the number of neighboring sites available for expansion. The main problem we address concerns the possibility of the long-term coexistence of the two species. We have shown that if we start the process with finitely many representatives of each type, then, under the assumption that the limit set in the corresponding first passage percolation model is uniformly curved, there is positive probability of coexistence.