• The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) concept requires an optical coronagraph that provides deep starlight suppression over a broad spectral bandwidth, high throughput for point sources at small angular separation, and insensitivity to temporally-varying, low-order aberrations. Vortex coronagraphs are a promising solution that perform optimally on off-axis, monolithic telescopes and may also be designed for segmented telescopes with minor losses in performance. We describe the key advantages of vortex coronagraphs on off-axis telescopes: 1) Unwanted diffraction due to aberrations is passively rejected in several low-order Zernike modes relaxing the wavefront stability requirements for imaging Earth-like planets from <10 to >100 pm rms. 2) Stars with angular diameters >0.1 $\lambda/D$ may be sufficiently suppressed. 3) The absolute planet throughput is >10%, even for unfavorable telescope architectures. 4) Broadband solutions ($\Delta\lambda/\lambda>0.1$) are readily available for both monolithic and segmented apertures. The latter make use of grayscale apodizers in an upstream pupil plane to provide suppression of diffracted light from amplitude discontinuities in the telescope pupil without inducing additional stroke on the deformable mirrors. We set wavefront stability requirements on the telescope, based on a stellar irradiance threshold set at an angular separation of 3$\pm$0.5 $\lambda/D$ from the star, and discuss how some requirements may be relaxed by trading robustness to aberrations for planet throughput.
  • High-contrast imaging and spectroscopy provide unique constraints for exoplanet formation models as well as for planetary atmosphere models. Instrumentation techniques in this field have greatly improved over the last two decades, with the development of stellar coronagraphy, in parallel with specific methods of wavefront sensing and control. Next generation space- and ground-based telescopes will allow the characterization cold solar-system like planets for the first time and maybe even in situ detection of bio-markers. However, the growth of primary mirror diameters, necessary for these detection, comes with an increase of their complexity (segmentation, secondary mirror features). These discontinuities in the aperture can greatly limit the performance of coronagraphic instruments. In this context, we introduced a new technique, Active Correction of Aperture Discontinuities - Optimized Stroke Minimization (ACAD-OSM), to correct for the diffractive effects of aperture discontinuities in the final image plane of a coronagraph, using deformable mirrors. In this paper, we present several tools that can be used to optimize the performance of this technique for its application to future large missions. In particular, we analyze the influence of the deformable setup (size and separating distance) and found that there is an optimal point for this setup, optimizing the performance of the instrument in contrast and throughput while minimizing the strokes applied to the deformable mirrors. These results will help us design future coronagraphic instruments to obtain the best performance.
  • We explore the capabilities of a starshade mission to directly image multi-star systems. In addition to the diffracted and scattered light for the on-axis star, a multi-star system features additional starlight leakage from the off-axis star that must also be controlled. A basic option is for additional starshades to block the off-axis stars. An interesting option takes the form of hybrid operation of a starshade in conjunction with an internal starlight suppression. Two hybrid scenarios are considered. One such scenario includes the coronagraph instrument blocking the on-axis star, with the starshade blocking off-axis starlight. Another scenario uses the wavefront control system in the coronagraph instrument and using a recent Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control (SNWC) technique can remove the off-axis stellar leakage to enable a region of high-contrast around the on-axis star blocked by the starshade.We present simulation results relevant for the WFIRST telescope.
  • The detection of molecular species in the atmospheres of earth-like exoplanets orbiting nearby stars requires an optical system that suppresses starlight and maximizes the sensitivity to the weak planet signals at small angular separations. Achieving sufficient contrast performance on a segmented aperture space telescope is particularly challenging due to unwanted diffraction within the telescope from amplitude and phase discontinuities in the pupil. Apodized vortex coronagraphs are a promising solution that theoretically meet the performance needs for high contrast imaging with future segmented space telescopes. We investigate the sensitivity of apodized vortex coronagraphs to the expected aberrations, including segment co-phasing errors in piston and tip/tilt as well as other low-order and mid-spatial frequency aberrations. Coronagraph designs and their associated telescope requirements are identified for conceptual HabEx and LUVOIR telescope designs.
  • Current state-of-the-art high contrast imaging instruments take advantage of a number of elegant coronagraph designs to suppress starlight and image nearby faint objects, such as exoplanets and circumstellar disks. The ideal performance and complexity of the optical systems depends strongly on the shape of the telescope aperture. Unfortunately, large primary mirrors tend to be segmented and have various obstructions, which limit the performance of most conventional coronagraph designs. We present a new family of vortex coronagraphs with numerically-optimized gray-scale apodizers that provide the sensitivity needed to directly image faint exoplanets with large, segmented aperture telescopes, including the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) as well as potential next-generation space telescopes.
  • The design and scale of a future mission to directly image and characterize potentially Earth-like planets will be impacted, to some degree, by the expected yield of such planets. Recent efforts to increase the estimated yields, by creating observation plans optimized for the detection and characterization of Earth-twins, have focused solely on coronagraphic instruments; starshade-based missions could benefit from a similar analysis. Here we explore how to prioritize observations for a starshade given the limiting resources of both fuel and time, present analytic expressions to estimate fuel use, and provide efficient numerical techniques for maximizing the yield of starshades. We implemented these techniques to create an approximate design reference mission code for starshades and used this code to investigate how exoEarth candidate yield responds to changes in mission, instrument, and astrophysical parameters for missions with a single starshade. We find that a starshade mission operates most efficiently somewhere between the fuel- and exposure-time limited regimes, and as a result, is less sensitive to photometric noise sources as well as parameters controlling the photon collection rate in comparison to a coronagraph. We produced optimistic yield curves for starshades, assuming our optimized observation plans are schedulable and future starshades are not thrust-limited. Given these yield curves, detecting and characterizing several dozen exoEarth candidates requires either multiple starshades or an eta_Earth > ~0.3.
  • Searching for nearby habitable worlds with direct imaging and spectroscopy will require a telescope large enough to provide angular resolution and sensitivity to planets around a significant sample of stars. Segmented telescopes are a compelling option to obtain such large apertures. However, these telescope designs have a complex geometry (central obstruction, support structures, segmentation) that makes high-contrast imaging more challenging. We are developing a new high-contrast imaging testbed at STScI to provide an integrated solution for wavefront control and starlight suppression on complex aperture geometries. We present our approach for the testbed optical design, which defines the surface requirements for each mirror to minimize the amplitude-induced errors from the propagation of out-of-pupil surfaces. Our approach guarantees that the testbed will not be limited by these Fresnel propagation effects, but only by the aperture geometry. This approach involves iterations between classical ray-tracing optical design optimization, and end-to-end Fresnel propagation with wavefront control (e.g. Electric Field Conjugation / Stroke Minimization). The construction of the testbed is planned to start in late Fall 2013.
  • We discuss scientific, technical and programmatic issues related to the use of an NRO 2.4m telescope for the WFIRST initiative of the 2010 Decadal Survey. We show that this implementation of WFIRST, which we call "NEW WFIRST," would achieve the goals of the NWNH Decadal Survey for the WFIRST core programs of Dark Energy and Microlensing Planet Finding, with the crucial benefit of deeper and/or wider near-IR surveys for GO science and a potentially Hubble-like Guest Observer program. NEW WFIRST could also include a coronagraphic imager for direct detection of dust disks and planets around neighboring stars, a high-priority science and technology precursor for future ambitious programs to image Earth-like planets around neighboring stars.
  • The specification of polishing requirements for the optics in coronagraphs dedicated to exo-planet detection requires careful and accurate optical modelling. Numerical representations of the propagation of aberrations through the system as well as simulations of the broadband wavefront compensation system using multiple DMs are critical when one devises an error budget for such a class of instruments. In this communication we introduce an analytical tool that serves this purpose for Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraphs. We first start by deriving the analytical form of the propagation of a harmonic ripple through a PIAA unit. Using this result we derive the chromaticity of the field at any plane in the optical train of a telescope equipped with such a coronagraph. Finally we study the chromatic response of a sequential DM wavefront actuator correcting such a corrugated field and thus quantify the requirements on the manufacturing of PIAA mirrors
  • The Telescope for Habitable Exoplanets and Interstellar/Intergalactic Astronomy (THEIA) is a mission concept study for a flagship-class telescope-occulter system to search for terrestrial planets and perform general astrophysics with a space-based 4m telescope. A number of design options were considered for the occulter and telescope optical systems; in this paper we discuss the design of occulters and coronagraphs for THEIA and examine their merits. We present two optimized occulters: a 25.6m-radius occulter with 19m petals that achieves 10^-12 suppression from 250-1000nm with a 75mas inner working angle, and a 20.0m-radius occulter with 10m petals that achieves 10^-12 suppression from 250-700nm with a 75mas inner working angle. For more widely separated planets (IWA > 108mas), this second occulter is designed to operate at a second closer distance where it provides 10^-12 suppression from 700-1000nm. We have also explored occulter/coronagraph hybrid systems, and found that an AIC coronagraph that exploits the symmetry of the PSF at the occulter can improve performance; however, it requires very accurate tolerances on the occulter manufacturing of the telescope/occulter system as the AIC does not cancel asymmetric terms. Other coronagraphs proved infeasible, primarily due to the fact that the residual starlight from the occulter is not a plane wave, and so is poorly suppressed by the coronagraph.
  • We propose to use a high throughput and high precision multi-object dispersed fixed-delay interferometer for all sky Doppler surveys for extrasolar planets. This instrument, a combination of a fixed-delay interferometer with a moderate resolution spectrometer,is completely different from current echelle spectrometers. Doppler RV is measured through monitoring interference fringe shifts of stellar absorption lines over a broad band. Coupling this multi-object instrument with a wide field telescope (a few degree, such as Sloan and WIYN) and UV, visible and near-IR detectors will allow to simultaneously obtain hundreds of stellar fringing spectra for searching for planets. The RV survey speed can be increased by more than 2 orders of magnitude over that for the echelles. A prototype dispersed fixed-delay interferometer has been observed at the Hobby-Eberly 9m and Palomar 5m telescopes in 2001 and demonstrated photo noise limited Doppler precision with Aldebaran. Our recent observations at the KPNO 2.1m telescope in 2002 demonstrate a short term Doppler precision of ~ 3 m/s with eta Cas (V = 3.5), a RV stable star and also obtained a RV curve for 51 Peg. (V = 5.5), confirming previous planet detection with an independent RV technique. The total measured detection efficiency including the sky, telescope and fiber transmission losses, the instrument and iodine transmission losses and detector quantum efficiency is 3.4% under 1.5 arcsec seeing conditions, which is comparable to all of the echelle spectrometers for planet detection.