• A classical problem in causal inference is that of matching, where treatment units need to be matched to control units based on covariate information. In this work, we propose a method that computes high quality almost-exact matches for high-dimensional categorical datasets. This method, called FLAME (Fast Large-scale Almost Matching Exactly), learns a distance metric for matching using a hold-out training data set. In order to perform matching efficiently for large datasets, FLAME leverages techniques that are natural for query processing in the area of database management, and two implementations of FLAME are provided: the first uses SQL queries and the second uses bit-vector techniques. The algorithm starts by constructing matches of the highest quality (exact matches on all covariates), and successively eliminates variables in order to match exactly on as many variables as possible, while still maintaining interpretable high-quality matches and balance between treatment and control groups. We leverage these high quality matches to estimate conditional average treatment effects (CATEs). Our experiments show that FLAME scales to huge datasets with millions of observations where existing state-of-the-art methods fail, and that it achieves significantly better performance than other matching methods.
  • There are many approaches is use today to either prevent or minimize the impact of inter-query interactions on a shared cluster. Despite these measures, performance issues due to concurrent executions of mixed workloads still prevail causing undue waiting times for queries. Analyzing these resource interferences is thus critical in order to answer time sensitive questions like 'who is causing my query to slowdown' in a multi-tenant environment. More importantly, dignosing whether the slowdown of a query is a result of resource contentions caused by other queries or some other external factor can help an admin narrow down the many possibilities of performance degradation. This process of investigating the symptoms of resource contentions and attributing blame to concurrent queries is non-trivial and tedious, and involves hours of manually debugging through a cycle of query interactions. In this paper, we present ProtoXplore - a Proto or first system to eXplore contentions, that helps administrators determine whether the blame for resource bottlenecks can be attributed to concurrent queries, and uses a methodology called Resource Acquire Time Penalty (RATP) to quantify this blame towards contentious sources accurately. Further, ProtoXplore builds on the theory of explanations and enables a step-wise deep exploration of various levels of performance bottlenecks faced by a query during its execution using a multi-level directed acyclic graph called ProtoGraph. Our experimental evaluation uses ProtoXplore to analyze the interactions between TPC-DS queries on Apache Spark to show how ProtoXplore provides explanations that help in diagnosing contention related issues and better managing a changing mixed workload in a shared cluster.
  • The study of causality or causal inference - how much a given treatment causally affects a given outcome in a population - goes way beyond correlation or association analysis of variables, and is critical in making sound data driven decisions and policies in a multitude of applications. The gold standard in causal inference is performing "controlled experiments", which often is not possible due to logistical or ethical reasons. As an alternative, inferring causality on "observational data" based on the "Neyman-Rubin potential outcome model" has been extensively used in statistics, economics, and social sciences over several decades. In this paper, we present a formal framework for sound causal analysis on observational datasets that are given as multiple relations and where the population under study is obtained by joining these base relations. We study a crucial condition for inferring causality from observational data, called the "strong ignorability assumption" (the treatment and outcome variables should be independent in the joined relation given the observed covariates), using known conditional independences that hold in the base relations. We also discuss how the structure of the conditional independences in base relations given as graphical models help infer new conditional independences in the joined relation. The proposed framework combines concepts from databases, statistics, and graphical models, and aims to initiate new research directions spanning these fields to facilitate powerful data-driven decisions in today's big data world.
  • In this paper, we study the complexity of answering conjunctive queries (CQ) with inequalities). In particular, we are interested in comparing the complexity of the query with and without inequalities. The main contribution of our work is a novel combinatorial technique that enables us to use any Select-Project-Join query plan for a given CQ without inequalities in answering the CQ with inequalities, with an additional factor in running time that only depends on the query. The key idea is to define a new projection operator, which keeps a small representation (independent of the size of the database) of the set of input tuples that map to each tuple in the output of the projection; this representation is used to evaluate all the inequalities in the query. Second, we generalize a result by Papadimitriou-Yannakakis [17] and give an alternative algorithm based on the color-coding technique [4] to evaluate a CQ with inequalities by using an algorithm for the CQ without inequalities. Third, we investigate the structure of the query graph, inequality graph, and the augmented query graph with inequalities, and show that even if the query and the inequality graphs have bounded treewidth, the augmented graph not only can have an unbounded treewidth but can also be NP-hard to evaluate. Further, we illustrate classes of queries and inequalities where the augmented graphs have unbounded treewidth, but the CQ with inequalities can be evaluated in poly-time. Finally, we give necessary properties and sufficient properties that allow a class of CQs to have poly-time combined complexity with respect to any inequality pattern. We also illustrate classes of queries where our query-plan-based technique outperforms the alternative approaches discussed in the paper.
  • Query evaluation in tuple-independent probabilistic databases is the problem of computing the probability of an answer to a query given independent probabilities of the individual tuples in a database instance. There are two main approaches to this problem: (1) in `grounded inference' one first obtains the lineage for the query and database instance as a Boolean formula, then performs weighted model counting on the lineage (i.e., computes the probability of the lineage given probabilities of its independent Boolean variables); (2) in methods known as `lifted inference' or `extensional query evaluation', one exploits the high-level structure of the query as a first-order formula. Although it is widely believed that lifted inference is strictly more powerful than grounded inference on the lineage alone, no formal separation has previously been shown for query evaluation. In this paper we show such a formal separation for the first time. We exhibit a class of queries for which model counting can be done in polynomial time using extensional query evaluation, whereas the algorithms used in state-of-the-art exact model counters on their lineages provably require exponential time. Our lower bounds on the running times of these exact model counters follow from new exponential size lower bounds on the kinds of d-DNNF representations of the lineages that these model counters (either explicitly or implicitly) produce. Though some of these queries have been studied before, no non-trivial lower bounds on the sizes of these representations for these queries were previously known.
  • The best current methods for exactly computing the number of satisfying assignments, or the satisfying probability, of Boolean formulas can be seen, either directly or indirectly, as building 'decision-DNNF' (decision decomposable negation normal form) representations of the input Boolean formulas. Decision-DNNFs are a special case of 'd-DNNF's where 'd' stands for 'deterministic'. We show that any decision-DNNF can be converted into an equivalent 'FBDD' (free binary decision diagram) -- also known as a 'read-once branching program' (ROBP or 1-BP) -- with only a quasipolynomial increase in representation size in general, and with only a polynomial increase in size in the special case of monotone k-DNF formulas. Leveraging known exponential lower bounds for FBDDs, we then obtain similar exponential lower bounds for decision-DNNFs which provide lower bounds for the recent algorithms. We also separate the power of decision-DNNFs from d-DNNFs and a generalization of decision-DNNFs known as AND-FBDDs. Finally we show how these imply exponential lower bounds for natural problems associated with probabilistic databases.
  • We study the problem of concealing functionality of a proprietary or private module when provenance information is shown over repeated executions of a workflow which contains both `public' and `private' modules. Our approach is to use `provenance views' to hide carefully chosen subsets of data over all executions of the workflow to ensure G-privacy: for each private module and each input x, the module's output f(x) is indistinguishable from G -1 other possible values given the visible data in the workflow executions. We show that G-privacy cannot be achieved simply by combining solutions for individual private modules; data hiding must also be `propagated' through public modules. We then examine how much additional data must be hidden and when it is safe to stop propagating data hiding. The answer depends strongly on the workflow topology as well as the behavior of public modules on the visible data. In particular, for a class of workflows (which include the common tree and chain workflows), taking private solutions for each private module, augmented with a `public closure' that is `upstream-downstream safe', ensures G-privacy. We define these notions formally and show that the restrictions are necessary. We also study the related optimization problems of minimizing the amount of hidden data.
  • Scientific workflow systems increasingly store provenance information about the module executions used to produce a data item, as well as the parameter settings and intermediate data items passed between module executions. However, authors/owners of workflows may wish to keep some of this information confidential. In particular, a module may be proprietary, and users should not be able to infer its behavior by seeing mappings between all data inputs and outputs. The problem we address in this paper is the following: Given a workflow, abstractly modeled by a relation R, a privacy requirement \Gamma and costs associated with data. The owner of the workflow decides which data (attributes) to hide, and provides the user with a view R' which is the projection of R over attributes which have not been hidden. The goal is to minimize the cost of hidden data while guaranteeing that individual modules are \Gamma -private. We call this the "secureview" problem. We formally define the problem, study its complexity, and offer algorithmic solutions.
  • A boolean expression is in read-once form if each of its variables appears exactly once. When the variables denote independent events in a probability space, the probability of the event denoted by the whole expression in read-once form can be computed in polynomial time (whereas the general problem for arbitrary expressions is #P-complete). Known approaches to checking read-once property seem to require putting these expressions in disjunctive normal form. In this paper, we tell a better story for a large subclass of boolean event expressions: those that are generated by conjunctive queries without self-joins and on tuple-independent probabilistic databases. We first show that given a tuple-independent representation and the provenance graph of an SPJ query plan without self-joins, we can, without using the DNF of a result event expression, efficiently compute its co-occurrence graph. From this, the read-once form can already, if it exists, be computed efficiently using existing techniques. Our second and key contribution is a complete, efficient, and simple to implement algorithm for computing the read-once forms (whenever they exist) directly, using a new concept, that of co-table graph, which can be significantly smaller than the co-occurrence graph.