• We consider the task of learning the parameters of a {\em single} component of a mixture model, for the case when we are given {\em side information} about that component, we call this the "search problem" in mixture models. We would like to solve this with computational and sample complexity lower than solving the overall original problem, where one learns parameters of all components. Our main contributions are the development of a simple but general model for the notion of side information, and a corresponding simple matrix-based algorithm for solving the search problem in this general setting. We then specialize this model and algorithm to four common scenarios: Gaussian mixture models, LDA topic models, subspace clustering, and mixed linear regression. For each one of these we show that if (and only if) the side information is informative, we obtain parameter estimates with greater accuracy, and also improved computation complexity than existing moment based mixture model algorithms (e.g. tensor methods). We also illustrate several natural ways one can obtain such side information, for specific problem instances. Our experiments on real data sets (NY Times, Yelp, BSDS500) further demonstrate the practicality of our algorithms showing significant improvement in runtime and accuracy.
  • We consider support recovery in the quadratic logistic regression setting - where the target depends on both p linear terms $x_i$ and up to $p^2$ quadratic terms $x_i x_j$. Quadratic terms enable prediction/modeling of higher-order effects between features and the target, but when incorporated naively may involve solving a very large regression problem. We consider the sparse case, where at most $s$ terms (linear or quadratic) are non-zero, and provide a new faster algorithm. It involves (a) identifying the weak support (i.e. all relevant variables) and (b) standard logistic regression optimization only on these chosen variables. The first step relies on a novel insight about correlation tests in the presence of non-linearity, and takes $O(pn)$ time for $n$ samples - giving potentially huge computational gains over the naive approach. Motivated by insights from the boolean case, we propose a non-linear correlation test for non-binary finite support case that involves hashing a variable and then correlating with the output variable. We also provide experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods.
  • A rank-$r$ matrix $X \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times n}$ can be written as a product $U V^\top$, where $U \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times r}$ and $V \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times r}$. One could exploit this observation in optimization: e.g., consider the minimization of a convex function $f(X)$ over rank-$r$ matrices, where the set of rank-$r$ matrices is modeled via the factorization $UV^\top$. Though such parameterization reduces the number of variables, and is more computationally efficient (of particular interest is the case $r \ll \min\{m, n\}$), it comes at a cost: $f(UV^\top)$ becomes a non-convex function w.r.t. $U$ and $V$. We study such parameterization for optimization of generic convex objectives $f$, and focus on first-order, gradient descent algorithmic solutions. We propose the Bi-Factored Gradient Descent (BFGD) algorithm, an efficient first-order method that operates on the $U, V$ factors. We show that when $f$ is (restricted) smooth, BFGD has local sublinear convergence, and linear convergence when $f$ is both (restricted) smooth and (restricted) strongly convex. For several key applications, we provide simple and efficient initialization schemes that provide approximate solutions good enough for the above convergence results to hold.
  • In this paper we present a new algorithm for computing a low rank approximation of the product $A^TB$ by taking only a single pass of the two matrices $A$ and $B$. The straightforward way to do this is to (a) first sketch $A$ and $B$ individually, and then (b) find the top components using PCA on the sketch. Our algorithm in contrast retains additional summary information about $A,B$ (e.g. row and column norms etc.) and uses this additional information to obtain an improved approximation from the sketches. Our main analytical result establishes a comparable spectral norm guarantee to existing two-pass methods; in addition we also provide results from an Apache Spark implementation that shows better computational and statistical performance on real-world and synthetic evaluation datasets.
  • We study the projected gradient descent method on low-rank matrix problems with a strongly convex objective. We use the Burer-Monteiro factorization approach to implicitly enforce low-rankness; such factorization introduces non-convexity in the objective. We focus on constraint sets that include both positive semi-definite (PSD) constraints and specific matrix norm-constraints. Such criteria appear in quantum state tomography and phase retrieval applications. We show that non-convex projected gradient descent favors local linear convergence in the factored space. We build our theory on a novel descent lemma, that non-trivially extends recent results on the unconstrained problem. The resulting algorithm is Projected Factored Gradient Descent, abbreviated as ProjFGD, and shows superior performance compared to state of the art on quantum state tomography and sparse phase retrieval applications.
  • We consider the non-square matrix sensing problem, under restricted isometry property (RIP) assumptions. We focus on the non-convex formulation, where any rank-$r$ matrix $X \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times n}$ is represented as $UV^\top$, where $U \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times r}$ and $V \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times r}$. In this paper, we complement recent findings on the non-convex geometry of the analogous PSD setting [5], and show that matrix factorization does not introduce any spurious local minima, under RIP.
  • We consider the problem of solving mixed random linear equations with $k$ components. This is the noiseless setting of mixed linear regression. The goal is to estimate multiple linear models from mixed samples in the case where the labels (which sample corresponds to which model) are not observed. We give a tractable algorithm for the mixed linear equation problem, and show that under some technical conditions, our algorithm is guaranteed to solve the problem exactly with sample complexity linear in the dimension, and polynomial in $k$, the number of components. Previous approaches have required either exponential dependence on $k$, or super-linear dependence on the dimension. The proposed algorithm is a combination of tensor decomposition and alternating minimization. Our analysis involves proving that the initialization provided by the tensor method allows alternating minimization, which is equivalent to EM in our setting, to converge to the global optimum at a linear rate.
  • This paper considers the recovery of a rank $r$ positive semidefinite matrix $X X^T\in\mathbb{R}^{n\times n}$ from $m$ scalar measurements of the form $y_i := a_i^T X X^T a_i$ (i.e., quadratic measurements of $X$). Such problems arise in a variety of applications, including covariance sketching of high-dimensional data streams, quadratic regression, quantum state tomography, among others. A natural approach to this problem is to minimize the loss function $f(U) = \sum_i (y_i - a_i^TUU^Ta_i)^2$ which has an entire manifold of solutions given by $\{XO\}_{O\in\mathcal{O}_r}$ where $\mathcal{O}_r$ is the orthogonal group of $r\times r$ orthogonal matrices; this is {\it non-convex} in the $n\times r$ matrix $U$, but methods like gradient descent are simple and easy to implement (as compared to semidefinite relaxation approaches). In this paper we show that once we have $m \geq C nr \log^2(n)$ samples from isotropic gaussian $a_i$, with high probability {\em (a)} this function admits a dimension-independent region of {\em local strong convexity} on lines perpendicular to the solution manifold, and {\em (b)} with an additional polynomial factor of $r$ samples, a simple spectral initialization will land within the region of convexity with high probability. Together, this implies that gradient descent with initialization (but no re-sampling) will converge linearly to the correct $X$, up to an orthogonal transformation. We believe that this general technique (local convexity reachable by spectral initialization) should prove applicable to a broader class of nonconvex optimization problems.
  • This paper considers the problem of matrix completion when some number of the columns are completely and arbitrarily corrupted, potentially by a malicious adversary. It is well-known that standard algorithms for matrix completion can return arbitrarily poor results, if even a single column is corrupted. One direct application comes from robust collaborative filtering. Here, some number of users are so-called manipulators who try to skew the predictions of the algorithm by calibrating their inputs to the system. In this paper, we develop an efficient algorithm for this problem based on a combination of a trimming procedure and a convex program that minimizes the nuclear norm and the $\ell_{1,2}$ norm. Our theoretical results show that given a vanishing fraction of observed entries, it is nevertheless possible to complete the underlying matrix even when the number of corrupted columns grows. Significantly, our results hold without any assumptions on the locations or values of the observed entries of the manipulated columns. Moreover, we show by an information-theoretic argument that our guarantees are nearly optimal in terms of the fraction of sampled entries on the authentic columns, the fraction of corrupted columns, and the rank of the underlying matrix. Our results therefore sharply characterize the tradeoffs between sample, robustness and rank in matrix completion.
  • We study the minimization of a convex function $f(X)$ over the set of $n\times n$ positive semi-definite matrices, but when the problem is recast as $\min_U g(U) := f(UU^\top)$, with $U \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times r}$ and $r \leq n$. We study the performance of gradient descent on $g$---which we refer to as Factored Gradient Descent (FGD)---under standard assumptions on the original function $f$. We provide a rule for selecting the step size and, with this choice, show that the local convergence rate of FGD mirrors that of standard gradient descent on the original $f$: i.e., after $k$ steps, the error is $O(1/k)$ for smooth $f$, and exponentially small in $k$ when $f$ is (restricted) strongly convex. In addition, we provide a procedure to initialize FGD for (restricted) strongly convex objectives and when one only has access to $f$ via a first-order oracle; for several problem instances, such proper initialization leads to global convergence guarantees. FGD and similar procedures are widely used in practice for problems that can be posed as matrix factorization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to provide precise convergence rate guarantees for general convex functions under standard convex assumptions.
  • Stochastic gradient descent is the method of choice for large-scale machine learning problems, by virtue of its light complexity per iteration. However, it lags behind its non-stochastic counterparts with respect to the convergence rate, due to high variance introduced by the stochastic updates. The popular Stochastic Variance-Reduced Gradient (SVRG) method mitigates this shortcoming, introducing a new update rule which requires infrequent passes over the entire input dataset to compute the full-gradient. In this work, we propose CheapSVRG, a stochastic variance-reduction optimization scheme. Our algorithm is similar to SVRG but instead of the full gradient, it uses a surrogate which can be efficiently computed on a small subset of the input data. It achieves a linear convergence rate ---up to some error level, depending on the nature of the optimization problem---and features a trade-off between the computational complexity and the convergence rate. Empirical evaluation shows that CheapSVRG performs at least competitively compared to the state of the art.
  • In this paper we consider the collaborative ranking setting: a pool of users each provides a small number of pairwise preferences between $d$ possible items; from these we need to predict preferences of the users for items they have not yet seen. We do so by fitting a rank $r$ score matrix to the pairwise data, and provide two main contributions: (a) we show that an algorithm based on convex optimization provides good generalization guarantees once each user provides as few as $O(r\log^2 d)$ pairwise comparisons -- essentially matching the sample complexity required in the related matrix completion setting (which uses actual numerical as opposed to pairwise information), and (b) we develop a large-scale non-convex implementation, which we call AltSVM, that trains a factored form of the matrix via alternating minimization (which we show reduces to alternating SVM problems), and scales and parallelizes very well to large problem settings. It also outperforms common baselines on many moderately large popular collaborative filtering datasets in both NDCG and in other measures of ranking performance.
  • Phase retrieval problems involve solving linear equations, but with missing sign (or phase, for complex numbers) information. More than four decades after it was first proposed, the seminal error reduction algorithm of (Gerchberg and Saxton 1972) and (Fienup 1982) is still the popular choice for solving many variants of this problem. The algorithm is based on alternating minimization; i.e. it alternates between estimating the missing phase information, and the candidate solution. Despite its wide usage in practice, no global convergence guarantees for this algorithm are known. In this paper, we show that a (resampling) variant of this approach converges geometrically to the solution of one such problem -- finding a vector $\mathbf{x}$ from $\mathbf{y},\mathbf{A}$, where $\mathbf{y} = \left|\mathbf{A}^{\top}\mathbf{x}\right|$ and $|\mathbf{z}|$ denotes a vector of element-wise magnitudes of $\mathbf{z}$ -- under the assumption that $\mathbf{A}$ is Gaussian. Empirically, we demonstrate that alternating minimization performs similar to recently proposed convex techniques for this problem (which are based on "lifting" to a convex matrix problem) in sample complexity and robustness to noise. However, it is much more efficient and can scale to large problems. Analytically, for a resampling version of alternating minimization, we show geometric convergence to the solution, and sample complexity that is off by log factors from obvious lower bounds. We also establish close to optimal scaling for the case when the unknown vector is sparse. Our work represents the first theoretical guarantee for alternating minimization (albeit with resampling) for any variant of phase retrieval problems in the non-convex setting.
  • An active learner is given a class of models, a large set of unlabeled examples, and the ability to interactively query labels of a subset of these examples; the goal of the learner is to learn a model in the class that fits the data well. Previous theoretical work has rigorously characterized label complexity of active learning, but most of this work has focused on the PAC or the agnostic PAC model. In this paper, we shift our attention to a more general setting -- maximum likelihood estimation. Provided certain conditions hold on the model class, we provide a two-stage active learning algorithm for this problem. The conditions we require are fairly general, and cover the widely popular class of Generalized Linear Models, which in turn, include models for binary and multi-class classification, regression, and conditional random fields. We provide an upper bound on the label requirement of our algorithm, and a lower bound that matches it up to lower order terms. Our analysis shows that unlike binary classification in the realizable case, just a single extra round of interaction is sufficient to achieve near-optimal performance in maximum likelihood estimation. On the empirical side, the recent work in ~\cite{Zhang12} and~\cite{Zhang14} (on active linear and logistic regression) shows the promise of this approach.
  • In this paper we propose new techniques to sample arbitrary third-order tensors, with an objective of speeding up tensor algorithms that have recently gained popularity in machine learning. Our main contribution is a new way to select, in a biased random way, only $O(n^{1.5}/\epsilon^2)$ of the possible $n^3$ elements while still achieving each of the three goals: \\ {\em (a) tensor sparsification}: for a tensor that has to be formed from arbitrary samples, compute very few elements to get a good spectral approximation, and for arbitrary orthogonal tensors {\em (b) tensor completion:} recover an exactly low-rank tensor from a small number of samples via alternating least squares, or {\em (c) tensor factorization:} approximating factors of a low-rank tensor corrupted by noise. \\ Our sampling can be used along with existing tensor-based algorithms to speed them up, removing the computational bottleneck in these methods.
  • Graph clustering involves the task of dividing nodes into clusters, so that the edge density is higher within clusters as opposed to across clusters. A natural, classic and popular statistical setting for evaluating solutions to this problem is the stochastic block model, also referred to as the planted partition model. In this paper we present a new algorithm--a convexified version of Maximum Likelihood--for graph clustering. We show that, in the classic stochastic block model setting, it outperforms existing methods by polynomial factors when the cluster size is allowed to have general scalings. In fact, it is within logarithmic factors of known lower bounds for spectral methods, and there is evidence suggesting that no polynomial time algorithm would do significantly better. We then show that this guarantee carries over to a more general extension of the stochastic block model. Our method can handle the settings of semi-random graphs, heterogeneous degree distributions, unequal cluster sizes, unaffiliated nodes, partially observed graphs and planted clique/coloring etc. In particular, our results provide the best exact recovery guarantees to date for the planted partition, planted k-disjoint-cliques and planted noisy coloring models with general cluster sizes; in other settings, we match the best existing results up to logarithmic factors.
  • In this paper we look at content placement in the high-dimensional regime: there are n servers, and O(n) distinct types of content. Each server can store and serve O(1) types at any given time. Demands for these content types arrive, and have to be served in an online fashion; over time, there are a total of O(n) of these demands. We consider the algorithmic task of content placement: determining which types of content should be on which server at any given time, in the setting where the demand statistics (i.e. the relative popularity of each type of content) are not known a-priori, but have to be inferred from the very demands we are trying to satisfy. This is the high- dimensional regime because this scaling (everything being O(n)) prevents consistent estimation of demand statistics; it models many modern settings where large numbers of users, servers and videos/webpages interact in this way. We characterize the performance of any scheme that separates learning and placement (i.e. which use a portion of the demands to gain some estimate of the demand statistics, and then uses the same for the remaining demands), showing it is order-wise strictly suboptimal. We then study a simple adaptive scheme - which myopically attempts to store the most recently requested content on idle servers - and show it outperforms schemes that separate learning and placement. Our results also generalize to the setting where the demand statistics change with time. Overall, our results demonstrate that separating the estimation of demand, and the subsequent use of the same, is strictly suboptimal.
  • A common phenomena in modern recommendation systems is the use of feedback from one user to infer the `value' of an item to other users. This results in an exploration vs. exploitation trade-off, in which items of possibly low value have to be presented to users in order to ascertain their value. Existing approaches to solving this problem focus on the case where the number of items are small, or admit some underlying structure -- it is unclear, however, if good recommendation is possible when dealing with content-rich settings with unstructured content. We consider this problem under a simple natural model, wherein the number of items and the number of item-views are of the same order, and an `access-graph' constrains which user is allowed to see which item. Our main insight is that the presence of the access-graph in fact makes good recommendation possible -- however this requires the exploration policy to be designed to take advantage of the access-graph. Our results demonstrate the importance of `serendipity' in exploration, and how higher graph-expansion translates to a higher quality of recommendations; it also suggests a reason why in some settings, simple policies like Twitter's `Latest-First' policy achieve a good performance. From a technical perspective, our model presents a way to study exploration-exploitation tradeoffs in settings where the number of `trials' and `strategies' are large (potentially infinite), and more importantly, of the same order. Our algorithms admit competitive-ratio guarantees which hold for the worst-case user, under both finite-population and infinite-horizon settings, and are parametrized in terms of properties of the underlying graph. Conversely, we also demonstrate that improperly-designed policies can be highly sub-optimal, and that in many settings, our results are order-wise optimal.
  • We consider the problem of subspace clustering: given points that lie on or near the union of many low-dimensional linear subspaces, recover the subspaces. To this end, one first identifies sets of points close to the same subspace and uses the sets to estimate the subspaces. As the geometric structure of the clusters (linear subspaces) forbids proper performance of general distance based approaches such as K-means, many model-specific methods have been proposed. In this paper, we provide new simple and efficient algorithms for this problem. Our statistical analysis shows that the algorithms are guaranteed exact (perfect) clustering performance under certain conditions on the number of points and the affinity between subspaces. These conditions are weaker than those considered in the standard statistical literature. Experimental results on synthetic data generated from the standard unions of subspaces model demonstrate our theory. We also show that our algorithm performs competitively against state-of-the-art algorithms on real-world applications such as motion segmentation and face clustering, with much simpler implementation and lower computational cost.
  • We propose a new method for robust PCA -- the task of recovering a low-rank matrix from sparse corruptions that are of unknown value and support. Our method involves alternating between projecting appropriate residuals onto the set of low-rank matrices, and the set of sparse matrices; each projection is {\em non-convex} but easy to compute. In spite of this non-convexity, we establish exact recovery of the low-rank matrix, under the same conditions that are required by existing methods (which are based on convex optimization). For an $m \times n$ input matrix ($m \leq n)$, our method has a running time of $O(r^2mn)$ per iteration, and needs $O(\log(1/\epsilon))$ iterations to reach an accuracy of $\epsilon$. This is close to the running time of simple PCA via the power method, which requires $O(rmn)$ per iteration, and $O(\log(1/\epsilon))$ iterations. In contrast, existing methods for robust PCA, which are based on convex optimization, have $O(m^2n)$ complexity per iteration, and take $O(1/\epsilon)$ iterations, i.e., exponentially more iterations for the same accuracy. Experiments on both synthetic and real data establishes the improved speed and accuracy of our method over existing convex implementations.
  • In this work, we propose a new randomized algorithm for computing a low-rank approximation to a given matrix. Taking an approach different from existing literature, our method first involves a specific biased sampling, with an element being chosen based on the leverage scores of its row and column, and then involves weighted alternating minimization over the factored form of the intended low-rank matrix, to minimize error only on these samples. Our method can leverage input sparsity, yet produce approximations in {\em spectral} (as opposed to the weaker Frobenius) norm; this combines the best aspects of otherwise disparate current results, but with a dependence on the condition number $\kappa = \sigma_1/\sigma_r$. In particular we require $O(nnz(M) + \frac{n\kappa^2 r^5}{\epsilon^2})$ computations to generate a rank-$r$ approximation to $M$ in spectral norm. In contrast, the best existing method requires $O(nnz(M)+ \frac{nr^2}{\epsilon^4})$ time to compute an approximation in Frobenius norm. Besides the tightness in spectral norm, we have a better dependence on the error $\epsilon$. Our method is naturally and highly parallelizable. Our new approach enables two extensions that are interesting on their own. The first is a new method to directly compute a low-rank approximation (in efficient factored form) to the product of two given matrices; it computes a small random set of entries of the product, and then executes weighted alternating minimization (as before) on these. The sampling strategy is different because now we cannot access leverage scores of the product matrix (but instead have to work with input matrices). The second extension is an improved algorithm with smaller communication complexity for the distributed PCA setting (where each server has small set of rows of the matrix, and want to compute low rank approximation with small amount of communication with other servers).
  • This paper considers the problem of clustering a partially observed unweighted graph---i.e., one where for some node pairs we know there is an edge between them, for some others we know there is no edge, and for the remaining we do not know whether or not there is an edge. We want to organize the nodes into disjoint clusters so that there is relatively dense (observed) connectivity within clusters, and sparse across clusters. We take a novel yet natural approach to this problem, by focusing on finding the clustering that minimizes the number of "disagreements"---i.e., the sum of the number of (observed) missing edges within clusters, and (observed) present edges across clusters. Our algorithm uses convex optimization; its basis is a reduction of disagreement minimization to the problem of recovering an (unknown) low-rank matrix and an (unknown) sparse matrix from their partially observed sum. We evaluate the performance of our algorithm on the classical Planted Partition/Stochastic Block Model. Our main theorem provides sufficient conditions for the success of our algorithm as a function of the minimum cluster size, edge density and observation probability; in particular, the results characterize the tradeoff between the observation probability and the edge density gap. When there are a constant number of clusters of equal size, our results are optimal up to logarithmic factors.
  • Matrix completion, i.e., the exact and provable recovery of a low-rank matrix from a small subset of its elements, is currently only known to be possible if the matrix satisfies a restrictive structural constraint---known as {\em incoherence}---on its row and column spaces. In these cases, the subset of elements is sampled uniformly at random. In this paper, we show that {\em any} rank-$ r $ $ n$-by-$ n $ matrix can be exactly recovered from as few as $O(nr \log^2 n)$ randomly chosen elements, provided this random choice is made according to a {\em specific biased distribution}: the probability of any element being sampled should be proportional to the sum of the leverage scores of the corresponding row, and column. Perhaps equally important, we show that this specific form of sampling is nearly necessary, in a natural precise sense; this implies that other perhaps more intuitive sampling schemes fail. We further establish three ways to use the above result for the setting when leverage scores are not known \textit{a priori}: (a) a sampling strategy for the case when only one of the row or column spaces are incoherent, (b) a two-phase sampling procedure for general matrices that first samples to estimate leverage scores followed by sampling for exact recovery, and (c) an analysis showing the advantages of weighted nuclear/trace-norm minimization over the vanilla un-weighted formulation for the case of non-uniform sampling.
  • Mixed linear regression involves the recovery of two (or more) unknown vectors from unlabeled linear measurements; that is, where each sample comes from exactly one of the vectors, but we do not know which one. It is a classic problem, and the natural and empirically most popular approach to its solution has been the EM algorithm. As in other settings, this is prone to bad local minima; however, each iteration is very fast (alternating between guessing labels, and solving with those labels). In this paper we provide a new initialization procedure for EM, based on finding the leading two eigenvectors of an appropriate matrix. We then show that with this, a re-sampled version of the EM algorithm provably converges to the correct vectors, under natural assumptions on the sampling distribution, and with nearly optimal (unimprovable) sample complexity. This provides not only the first characterization of EM's performance, but also much lower sample complexity as compared to both standard (randomly initialized) EM, and other methods for this problem.
  • Alternating minimization represents a widely applicable and empirically successful approach for finding low-rank matrices that best fit the given data. For example, for the problem of low-rank matrix completion, this method is believed to be one of the most accurate and efficient, and formed a major component of the winning entry in the Netflix Challenge. In the alternating minimization approach, the low-rank target matrix is written in a bi-linear form, i.e. $X = UV^\dag$; the algorithm then alternates between finding the best $U$ and the best $V$. Typically, each alternating step in isolation is convex and tractable. However the overall problem becomes non-convex and there has been almost no theoretical understanding of when this approach yields a good result. In this paper we present first theoretical analysis of the performance of alternating minimization for matrix completion, and the related problem of matrix sensing. For both these problems, celebrated recent results have shown that they become well-posed and tractable once certain (now standard) conditions are imposed on the problem. We show that alternating minimization also succeeds under similar conditions. Moreover, compared to existing results, our paper shows that alternating minimization guarantees faster (in particular, geometric) convergence to the true matrix, while allowing a simpler analysis.