• Previous studies have shown the filamentary structures in the cosmic web influence the alignments of nearby galaxies. We study this effect in the LOWZ sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using the "Cosmic Web Reconstruction" filament catalogue of Chen et al. (2016). We find that LOWZ galaxies exhibit a small but statistically significant alignment in the direction parallel to the orientation of nearby filaments. This effect is detectable even in the absence of nearby galaxy clusters, which suggests it is an effect from the matter distribution in the filament. A nonparametric regression model suggests that the alignment effect with filaments extends over separations of $30-40$ Mpc. We find that galaxies that are bright and early-forming align more strongly with the directions of nearby filaments than those that are faint and late-forming; however, trends with stellar mass are less statistically significant, within the narrow range of stellar mass of this sample.
  • We present measurements of $E_G$, a probe of gravity from large-scale structure, using BOSS LOWZ and CMASS spectroscopic samples, with lensing measurements from SDSS (galaxy lensing) and Planck (CMB lensing). Using SDSS lensing and the BOSS LOWZ sample, we measure $\langle E_G\rangle=0.37^{+0.036}_{-0.032}$ (stat) $\pm 0.026$ (systematic), consistent with the predicted value from the Planck $\Lambda$CDM model, $E_G=0.46$, considering the impact of systematic uncertainties. Using CMB lensing, we measure $\langle E_G\rangle=0.43^{+0.068}_{-0.073}$ (stat) for LOWZ (statistically consistent with galaxy lensing and Planck predictions) and $\langle E_G\rangle=0.39^{+0.05}_{-0.05}$ (stat) for the CMASS sample, consistent with the Planck prediction of $E_G=0.40$ given the higher redshift of the sample. We also study the redshift evolution of $E_G$ by splitting the LOWZ sample into two samples based on redshift, with results being consistent with model predictions at $2.5\sigma$ (stat) or better. We correct for the effects of non-linear physics and different window functions for clustering and lensing using analytical model and simulations, and demonstrate that these corrections are effective to $\sim 1-2$\%, well within our statistical uncertainties. For the case of SDSS lensing there is an additional $\sim5\%$ combined systematic uncertainty from shear calibration and photometric redshift uncertainties.
  • We study the covariance properties of real space correlation function estimators -- primarily galaxy-shear correlations, or galaxy-galaxy lensing -- using SDSS data for both shear catalogs and lenses (specifically the BOSS LOWZ sample). Using mock catalogs of lenses and sources, we disentangle the various contributions to the covariance matrix and compare them with a simple analytical model. We show that not subtracting the lensing measurement around random points from the measurement around the lens sample is equivalent to performing the measurement using the lens density field instead of the lens over-density field. While the measurement using the lens density field is unbiased (in the absence of systematics), its error is significantly larger due to an additional term in the covariance. Therefore, this subtraction should be performed regardless of its beneficial effects on systematics. Comparing the error estimates from data and mocks for estimators that involve the over-density, we find that the errors are dominated by the shape noise and lens clustering, that empirically estimated covariances (jackknife and standard deviation across mocks) are consistent with theoretical estimates, and that both the connected parts of the 4-point function and the super-sample covariance can be neglected for the current levels of noise. While the trade-off between different terms in the covariance depends on the survey configuration (area, source number density), the diagnostics that we use in this work should be useful for future works to test their empirically-determined covariances.
  • We present results from cross-correlating Planck CMB lensing maps with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy lensing shape catalog and BOSS galaxy catalogs. For galaxy position vs. CMB lensing cross-correlations, we measure the convergence signal around the galaxies in configuration space, using the BOSS LOWZ ($z\sim0.30$) and CMASS ($z\sim0.57$) samples. With fixed Planck 2015 cosmology, doing a joint fit with the galaxy clustering measurement, for the LOWZ (CMASS) sample we find a galaxy bias $b_g=1.75\pm0.04$ ($1.95\pm 0.02$) and galaxy-matter cross-correlation coefficient $r_{cc}=1.0\pm0.2$ ($0.8\pm 0.1$) using $20<r_p<70h^{-1}$Mpc, consistent with results from galaxy-galaxy lensing. Using the same scales and including the galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements, we constrain $\Omega_m=0.284\pm0.024$ and relative calibration bias between the CMB lensing and galaxy lensing to be $b_\gamma=0.82^{+0.15}_{-0.14}$. The combination of galaxy lensing and CMB lensing also allows us to measure the cosmological distance ratios (with $z_l\sim0.3$, $z_s\sim0.5$) $\mathcal R=\frac{D_s D_{l,*}}{D_* D_{l,s}}=2.68\pm0.29$, consistent with predictions from the Planck 2015 cosmology ($\mathcal R=2.35$). We detect the galaxy position-CMB convergence cross-correlation at small scales, $r_p<1h^{-1}$Mpc, and find consistency with lensing by NFW halos of mass $M_h\sim10^{13}h^{-1}M_\odot$. Finally, we measure the CMB lensing-galaxy shear cross-correlation, finding an amplitude of $A=0.76\pm0.23$ ($z_\text{eff}=0.35$, $\theta<2^\circ$) with respect to Planck 2015 $\Lambda$CDM predictions ($1\sigma$-level consistency). We do not find evidence for relative systematics between the CMB and SDSS galaxy lensing.
  • Measurements of intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes with the large-scale density field, and the inferred intrinsic alignments model parameters, are sensitive to the shape measurement methods used. In this paper we measure the intrinsic alignments of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) LOWZ galaxies using three different shape measurement methods (re-Gaussianization, isophotal, and de Vaucouleurs), identifying a variation in the inferred intrinsic alignments amplitude at the 40% level between these methods, independent of the galaxy luminosity or other properties. We also carry out a suite of systematics tests on the shapes and their two-point correlation functions, identifying a pronounced contribution from additive PSF systematics in the de Vaucouleurs shapes. Since different methods measure galaxy shapes at different effective radii, the trends we identify in the intrinsic alignments amplitude are consistent with the interpretation that the outer regions of galaxy shapes are more responsive to tidal fields, resulting in isophote twisting and stronger alignments for isophotal shapes. We observe environment dependence of ellipticity, with brightest galaxies in groups being rounder on average compared to satellite and field galaxies. We also study the anisotropy in intrinsic alignments measurements introduced by projected shapes, finding effects consistent with predictions of the nonlinear alignment model and hydrodynamic simulations. The large variations seen using the different shape measurement methods have important implications for intrinsic alignments forecasting and mitigation with future surveys.
  • The fundamental plane (FP) is a widely used tool to investigate the properties of early-type galaxies, and the tight relation between its parameters has spawned several cosmological applications, including its use as a distance indicator for peculiar velocity surveys and as a means to suppress intrinsic noise in cosmic size magnification measurements. Systematic trends with the large-scale structure across the FP could cause serious biases for these cosmological probes, but may also yield new insights into the early-type population. Here we report the first detection of spatial correlations among offsets in galaxy size from an FP that explicitly accounts for redshift trends, using a sample of about $95,000$ elliptical galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We show that these offsets correlate with the density field out to at least $10h^{-1}$Mpc at $4\sigma$ significance in a way that cannot be explained by systematic errors in galaxy size estimates. We propose a physical explanation for the correlations by dividing the sample into central, satellite, and field galaxies, identifying trends for each galaxy type separately. Central (satellite) galaxies lie on average above (below) the FP, which we argue could be due to a higher (lower) than average mass-to-light ratio. We fit a simple model to the correlations of FP residuals and use it to predict the impact on peculiar velocity power spectra, finding a contamination larger than $10\,\%$ for $k>0.04\,h/$Mpc. Moreover, cosmic magnification measurements based on an FP could be severely contaminated over a wide range of scales by the intrinsic FP correlations.
  • Intrinsic alignments (IA) of galaxies, i.e. correlations of galaxy shapes with each other or with the density field, are a major astrophysical source of contamination for weak lensing surveys. We present the results of IA measurements of galaxies on 0.1- 200 Mpc/h scales using the SDSS-III BOSS LOWZ sample, in the redshift range 0.16<z<0.36. We extend the existing IA measurements for spectroscopic LRGs to lower luminosities, and show that the luminosity dependence of large-scale IA can be well-described by a power law. Within the limited redshift and color range of our sample, we observe no significant redshift or color dependence of IA. We measure the halo mass of LOWZ galaxies using galaxy-galaxy lensing, and show that the mass dependence of large-scale IA is also well described by a power law. We detect variation in the scale dependence of IA with mass and luminosity, which underscores the need to use flexible templates in order to remove the IA signal. We also study the environment dependence of IA by splitting the sample into field and group galaxies, which are further split into satellite and central galaxies. We show that group central galaxies are aligned with their halos at small scales and also are aligned with the tidal fields out to large scales. We also detect the radial alignments of satellite galaxies within groups, which results in a null detection of large-scale intrinsic alignments for satellites. These results can be used to construct better intrinsic alignment models for removal of this contaminant to the weak lensing signal.
  • The intrinsic alignment of galaxies with the large-scale density field is an important astrophysical contaminant in upcoming weak lensing surveys. We present detailed measurements of the galaxy intrinsic alignments and associated ellipticity-direction (ED) and projected shape ($w_{g+}$) correlation functions for galaxies in the cosmological hydrodynamic MassiveBlack-II (MB-II) simulation. We carefully assess the effects on galaxy shapes, misalignment of the stellar component with the dark matter shape and two-point statistics of iterative weighted (by mass and luminosity) definitions of the (reduced and unreduced) inertia tensor. We find that iterative procedures must be adopted for a reliable measurement of the reduced tensor but that luminosity versus mass weighting has only negligible effects. Both ED and $w_{g+}$ correlations increase in amplitude with subhalo mass (in the range of $10^{10} - 6.0\times 10^{14}h^{-1}M_{\odot}$), with a weak redshift dependence (from $z=1$ to $z=0.06$) at fixed mass. At $z \sim 0.3$, we predict a $w_{g+}$ that is in reasonable agreement with SDSS LRG measurements and that decreases in amplitude by a factor of $\sim 5$--18 for galaxies in the LSST survey. We also compared the intrinsic alignments of centrals and satellites, with clear detection of satellite radial alignments within their host halos. Finally, we show that $w_{g+}$ (using subhalos as tracers of density) and $w_{\delta+}$ (using dark matter density) predictions from the simulations agree with that of non-linear alignment models (NLA) at scales where the 2-halo term dominates in the correlations (and tabulate associated NLA fitting parameters). The 1-halo term induces a scale dependent bias at small scales which is not modeled in the NLA model.