• The asteroid (25143) Itokawa is a target object of the Japanese sample return mission, HAYABUSA. We have observed Itokawa in optical wave- length (R-band) with the 1.05-m Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory, the 2.24-m telescope of University of Hawaii, and the 1.05-m telescope at the Misato Observatory since 2001. From the analysis of the data, we present the relationship between brightness and the solar phase angle, 6.9 to 87.8 deg. We obtained the absolute magnitude H_R(0) = 19.09+-0.37, and the slope parameter G_R = 0.25 +- 0.29. The rotational period of Itokawa is 12.1324 +- 0.0001 hours.
  • We present a unique and significant polarimetric result regarding the near-Earth asteroid (152679) 1998 KU$_\mathrm{2}$ , which has a very low geometric albedo. From our observations, we find that the linear polarization degrees of 1998 KU$_\mathrm{2}$ are 44.6 $\pm$ 0.5\% in the R$_\mathrm{C}$ band and 44.0 $\pm$ 0.6\% in the V band at a solar phase angle of 81.0\degr. These values are the highest of any known airless body in the solar system (i.e., high-polarization comets, asteroids, and planetary satellites) at similar phase angles. This polarimetric observation is not only the first for primitive asteroids at large phase angles, but also for low-albedo (< 0.1) airless bodies. Based on spectroscopic similarities and polarimetric measurements of materials that have been sorted by size in previous studies, we conjecture that 1998 KU$_\mathrm{2}$ has a highly microporous regolith structure comprising nano-sized carbon grains on the surface.
  • Impact-cratering processes on small bodies are thought to be mainly controlled by the local material strength because of their low surface gravity, and craters that are as large as the parent bodies should be affected by the target curvature. Although cratering processes on planar surfaces in the strength-controlled regime have been studied extensively, the mechanism by which target curvature affects the cratering processes remains unclear. Herein, we report on a series of impact experiments that used spherical targets with various diameters. The resultant craters consisted of a deep circular pit and an irregular-shaped spall region around the pit, which is consistent with the features reported in a number of previous cratering experiments on planar surfaces. However, the volume and radius of the craters increased with the normalized curvature. The results indicate that the increase in the spall-region volume and radius mainly contributes to the increase in the whole crater volume and radius, although the volume, depth, and radius of pits remain constant with curvature. The results of our model indicate that the geometric effect due to curvature (i.e., whereby the distance from the equivalent center to the target free surface is shorter for higher curvature values) contributes to increases in the cratering efficiency. Our results suggest that the impactors that produce the largest craters (basins) on some asteroids are thus smaller than what is estimated by current scaling laws, which do not take into account the curvature effects.
  • In the 1-2.5 micron range, spectroscopic observations are made on the AcuA-spec asteroids, whose spectra were obtained in a continuous covered mode between 2.5-5.0 micron by AKARI. Based on the Bus-DeMeo taxonomy (DeMeo et al. 2009, Icarus, 202, 160), all the AcuA-spec asteroids are classified, using the published and our observational data. Additionally, taking advantage of the Bus-DeMeo taxonomy characteristics, we constrain the characteristic each spectral type by combining the taxonomy results with the other physical observational data from colorimetry, polarimetry, radar, and radiometry. As a result, it is suggested that certain C-, Cb-, B-type, dark X-, and D-complex asteroids have spectral properties compatible with those of anhydrous interplanetary dust particles with tiny bright material, such as water ice. This supports the proposal regarding the C-complex asteroids (Vernazza et al. 2015, ApJ, 806, 204; 2017, AJ, 153, 72). A combination of the Bus-DeMeo taxonomy for AcuA-spec asteroids and the presumptions with other physical clues such as the polarimetric inversion angle, radar albedo, and mid-infrared spectroscopic spectra will be beneficial for surface material constraints, from the AcuA-spec asteroid observations.
  • We conducted a polarimetric observation of the fast-rotating near-Earth asteroid (1566) Icarus at large phase (Sun-asteroid-observer's) angles $\alpha$= 57 deg--141deg around the 2015 summer solstice. We found that the maximum values of the linear polarization degree are $P_\mathrm{max}$=7.32$\pm$0.25 % at phase angles of $\alpha_\mathrm{max}$=124$\pm$8 deg in the $V$-band and $P_\mathrm{max}$=7.04$\pm$0.21 % at $\alpha_\mathrm{max}$=124$\pm$6 deg in the $R_\mathrm{C}$-band. Applying the polarimetric slope-albedo empirical law, we derived a geometric albedo of $p_\mathrm{V}$=0.25$\pm$0.02, which is in agreement with that of Q-type taxonomic asteroids. $\alpha_\mathrm{max}$ is unambiguously larger than that of Mercury, the Moon, and another near-Earth S-type asteroid (4179) Toutatis but consistent with laboratory samples with hundreds of microns in size. The combination of the maximum polarization degree and the geometric albedo is in accordance with terrestrial rocks with a diameter of several hundreds of micrometers. The photometric function indicates a large macroscopic roughness. We hypothesize that the unique environment (i.e., the small perihelion distance $q$=0.187 au and a short rotational period of $T_\mathrm{rot}$=2.27 hours) may be attributed to the paucity of small grains on the surface, as indicated on (3200) Phaethon.
  • We conducted an optical and near-infrared polarimetric observation of the highly dormant Jupiter-Family Comet, 209P/LINEAR. Because of its low activity, we were able to determine the linear polarization degrees of the coma dust particles and nucleus independently, that is $P_n$=30.3$^{+1.3}_{-0.9}$% at $\alpha$=92.2$^\circ$ and $P_n$=31.0$^{+1.0}_{-0.7}$% at $\alpha$=99.5$^\circ$ for the nucleus, and $P_c$=28.8$^{+0.4}_{-0.4}$% at $\alpha$=92.2$^\circ$ and 29.6$^{+0.3}_{-0.3}$% at $\alpha$=99.5$^\circ$ for the coma. We detected no significant variation in $P$ at the phase angle coverage of 92.2$^\circ$-99.5$^\circ$, which may imply that the obtained polarization degrees are nearly at maximum in the phase-polarization curves. By fitting with an empirical function, we obtained the maximum values of linear polarization degrees $P_\mathrm{max}$=30.8% for the nucleus and $P_\mathrm{max}$=29.6% for the dust coma. The $P_\mathrm{max}$ of the dust coma is consistent with those of dust-rich comets. The low geometric albedo of $P_v$=0.05 was derived from the slope-albedo relationship and was associated with high $P_\mathrm{max}$. We examined $P_\mathrm{max}$-albedo relations between asteroids and 209P, and found that the so-called Umov law seems to be applicable on this cometary surface.
  • We report a new observation of the Jupiter-family comet 209P/LINEAR during its 2014 return. The comet is recognized as a dust source of a new meteor shower, the May Camelopardalids. 209P/LINEAR was apparently inactive at a heliocentric distance rh = 1.6 au and showed weak activity at rh < 1.4 au. We found an active region of <0.001% of the entire nuclear surface during the comet's dormant phase. An edge-on image suggests that particles up to 1 cm in size (with an uncertainty of factor 3-5) were ejected following a differential power-law size distribution with index q=-3.25+-0.10. We derived a mass loss rate of 2-10 kg/s during the active phase and a total mass of ~5x10^7 kg during the 2014 return. The ejection terminal velocity of millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles was 1-4 m/s, which is comparable to the escape velocity from the nucleus (1.4 m/s). These results imply that such large meteoric particles marginally escaped from the highly dormant comet nucleus via the gas drag force only within a few months of the perihelion passage.
  • We investigated the magnitude-phase relation of (162173) 1999 JU3, a target asteroid for the JAXA Hayabusa 2 sample return mission. We initially employed the international Astronomical Union's H-G formalism but found that it fits less well using a single set of parameters. To improve the inadequate fit, we employed two photometric functions, the Shevchenko and Hapke functions. With the Shevchenko function, we found that the magnitude-phase relation exhibits linear behavior in a wide phase angle range (alpha = 5-75 deg) and shows weak nonlinear opposition brightening at alpha< 5 deg, providing a more reliable absolute magnitude of Hv = 19.25 +- 0.03. The phase slope (0.039 +- 0.001 mag/deg) and opposition effect amplitude (parameterized by the ratio of intensity at alpha=0.3 deg to that at alpha=5 deg, I(0.3)/I(5)=1.31+-0.05) are consistent with those of typical C-type asteroids. We also attempted to determine the parameters for the Hapke model, which are applicable for constructing the surface reflectance map with the Hayabusa 2 onboard cameras. Although we could not constrain the full set of Hapke parameters, we obtained possible values, w=0.041, g=-0.38, B0=1.43, and h=0.050, assuming a surface roughness parameter theta=20 deg. By combining our photometric study with a thermal model of the asteroid (Mueller et al. in preparation), we obtained a geometric albedo of pv = 0.047 +- 0.003, phase integral q = 0.32 +- 0.03, and Bond albedo AB = 0.014 +- 0.002, which are commensurate with the values for common C-type asteroids.
  • We present the results of photometric observations carried out with four small telescopes of the asteroid 4 Vesta in the $B$, $R_{\rm C}$, and $z'$ bands at a minimum phase angle of 0.1 $\timeform{D}$. The magnitudes, reduced to unit distance and zero phase angle, were $M_{B}(1, 1, 0) = 3.83 \pm 0.01, M_{R_{\rm C}}(1, 1, 0) = 2.67 \pm 0.01$, and $M_{z'}(1, 1, 0) = 3.03 \pm 0.01$ mag. The absolute magnitude obtained from the IAU $H$--$G$ function is $\sim$0.1 mag darker than the magnitude at a phase angle of 0$\timeform{D}$ determined from the Shevchenko function and Hapke models with the coherent backscattering effect term. Our photometric measurements allowed us to derive geometric albedos of 0.35 in the $B$ band, 0.41 in the $R_{\rm C}$ band, and 0.31 in the $z'$ bands by using the Hapke model with the coherent backscattering effect term. Using the Hapke model, the porosity of the optically active regolith on Vesta was estimated to be $\rho$ = 0.4--0.7, yielding the bluk density of 0.9--2.0 $\times$ $10^3$ kg $\mathrm{m^{-3}}$. It is evident that the opposition effect for Vesta makes a contribution to not only the shadow-hiding effect, but also the coherent backscattering effect that appears from ca. $1\timeform{D}$. The amplitude of the coherent backscatter opposition effect for Vesta increases with a brightening of reflectance. By comparison with other solar system bodies, we suggest that multiple-scattering on an optically active scale may contribute to the amplitude of the coherent backscatter opposition effect ($B_{C0}$).
  • We present a comparative study of three infrared asteroid surveys based on the size and albedo data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Our study showed that: (i) the total number of asteroids detected with diameter and albedo information with these three surveyors is 138,285, which is largely contributed by WISE; (ii) the diameters and albedos measured by the three surveyors for 1,993 commonly detected asteroids are in good agreement, and within +/-10% in diameter and +/-22% in albedo at 1sigma deviation level. It is true that WISE offers size and albedo of a large fraction (>20%) of known asteroids down to a few km bodies, but we would suggest that the IRAS and AKARI catalogs compensate for larger asteroids up to several hundred km, especially in the main belt region. We discuss the complementarity of these three catalogs in order to facilitate the use of these data sets for characterizing the physical properties of minor planets.
  • We have observed the lightcurves of 13 V-type asteroids ((1933) Tinchen, (2011) Veteraniya, (2508) Alupka, (3657) Ermolova, (3900) Knezevic, (4005) Dyagilev, (4383) Suruga, (4434) Nikulin, (4796) Lewis, (6331) 1992 $\mathrm{FZ_{1}}$, (8645) 1998 TN, (10285) Renemichelsen, and (10320) Reiland). Using these observations we determined the rotational rates of the asteroids, with the exception of Nikulin and Renemichelsen. The distribution of rotational rates of 59 V-type asteroids in the inner main belt, including 29 members of the Vesta family that are regarded as ejecta from the asteroid (4) Vesta, is inconsistent with the best-fit Maxwellian distribution. This inconsistency may be due to the effect of thermal radiation Yarkovsky--O'Keefe--Radzievskii--Paddack (YORP) torques, and implies that the collision event that formed V-type asteroids is sub-billion to several billion years in age.
  • We present an analysis of the albedo properties of main belt asteroids detected by the All-Sky Survey of the infrared satellite AKARI. The characteristics of 5120 asteroids detected by the survey, including their sizes and albedos, were cataloged in the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA). Size and albedo measurements were based on the Standard Thermal Model, using inputs of infrared fluxes and absolute magnitudes. Main belt asteroids, which account for 4722 of the 5120 AcuA asteroids, have semimajor axes of 2.06 to 3.27 AU. AcuA provides a complete data set of all main belt asteroids brighter than the absolute magnitude of H < 10.3, which corresponds to the diameter of d > 20 km. We confirmed that the albedo distribution of the main belt asteroids is strongly bimodal as was already known from the past observations, and that the bimodal distribution occurs not only in the total population, but also within inner, middle, and outer regions of the main belt. We found that the small asteroids have much more variety in albedo than the large asteroids. In spite of the albedo transition process like space weathering, the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is nearly flat. The mean albedo of the total, on the other hand, gradually decreases with an increase in semimajor axis. This can be explained by the compositional ratio of taxonomic types; that is, the proportion of dark asteroids such as C- and D-types increases, while that of bright asteroids such as S-type decreases, with increasing heliocentric distance. The heliocentric distributions of X-subclasses: E-, M-, and P-type, which can be divided based on albedo values, are also examined. P-type, which is the major component in X-types, are distributed throughout the main belt regions, and the abundance of P-type increases beyond 3 AU. This distribution is similar to that of C- or D-types.
  • We present an asteroidal catalog from the mid-infrared wavelength region using the slow-scan observation mode obtained by the Infrared Camera (IRC) on-board the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI. An archive of IRC slow-scan observations comprising about 1000 images was used to search for serendipitous encounters of known asteroids. We have determined the geometric albedos and diameters for 88 main-belt asteroids, including two asteroids in the Hilda region, and compared these, where possible, with previously published values. Approximately one-third of the acquired data reflects new asteroidal information. Some bodies classified as C or D-type with high albedo were also identified in the catalog.
  • To examine the distribution of rotational rates for chips of asteroid 4 Vesta, lightcurve observation of seven V-type asteroids (2511 Patterson, 2640 Hallstorm, 2653 Principia, 2795 Lapage, 3307 Athabasca, 4147 Lennon, and 4977 Rauthgundis) were performed from fall 2003 to spring 2004. Distribution of spin rates of V-type main-belt asteroids from the past and our observations have three peaks. This result implies that age of catastrophic impact making Vesta family may be not as young as Karin and Iannini families but as old as Eos and Koronis families.
  • An inner main-belt asteroid, P/2010 A2, was discovered on January 6th, 2010. Based on its orbital elements, it is considered that the asteroid belongs to the Flora collisional family, where S-type asteroids are common, whilst showing a comet-like dust tail. Although analysis of images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and Rosetta spacecraft suggested that the dust tail resulted from a recent head-on collision between asteroids (Jewitt et al. 2010; Snodgrass et al. 2010), an alternative idea of ice sublimation was suggested based on the morphological fitting of ground-based images (Moreno et al. 2010). Here, we report a multiband observation of P/2010 A2 made on January 2010 with a 105 cm telescope at the Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory. Three broadband filters, $g'$, $R_c$, and $I_c$, were employed for the observation. The unique multiband data reveals that the reflectance spectrum of the P/2010 A2 dust tail resembles that of an Sq-type asteroid or that of ordinary chondrites rather than that of an S-type asteroid. Due to the large error of the measurement, the reflectance spectrum also resembles the spectra of C-type asteroids, even though C-type asteroids are uncommon in the Flora family. The reflectances relative to the $g'$-band (470 nm) are 1.096$\pm$0.046 at the $R_c$-band (650 nm) and 1.131$\pm$0.061 at the $I_c$-band (800 nm). We hypothesize that the parent body of P/2010 A2 was originally S-type but was then shattered upon collision into scaterring fresh chondritic particles from the interior, thus forming the dust tail.
  • Strange-looking dust cloud around asteroid (596) Scheila was discovered on 2010 December 11.44-11.47. Unlike normal cometary tails, it consisted of three tails and faded within two months. We constructed a model to reproduce the morphology of the dust cloud based on the laboratory measurement of high velocity impacts and the dust dynamics. As the result, we succeeded in the reproduction of peculiar dust cloud by an impact-driven ejecta plume consisting of an impact cone and downrange plume. Assuming an impact angle of 45 deg, our model suggests that a decameter-sized asteroid collided with (596) Scheila from the direction of (alpha, delta) = (60deg, -40deg) in J2000 coordinates on 2010 December 3. The maximum ejection velocity of the dust particles exceeded 100 m/s. Our results suggest that the surface of (596) Scheila consists of materials with low tensile strength.
  • We present lightcurve observations and multiband photometry for 107P/Wilson-Harrington using five small- and medium-sized telescopes. The lightcurve has shown a periodicity of 0.2979 day (7.15 hour) and 0.0993 day (2.38 hour), which has a commensurability of 3:1. The physical properties of the lightcurve indicate two models: (1) 107P/Wilson-Harrington is a tumbling object with a sidereal rotation period of 0.2979 day and a precession period of 0.0993 day. The shape has a long axis mode (LAM) of L1:L2:L3 = 1.0:1.0:1.6. The direction of the total rotational angular momentum is around {\lambda} = 310{\deg}, {\beta} = -10{\deg}, or {\lambda} = 132{\deg}, {\beta} = -17{\deg}. The nutation angle is approximately constant at 65{\deg}. (2) 107P/Wilson-Harrington is not a tumbler. The sidereal rotation period is 0.2979 day. The shape is nearly spherical but slightly hexagonal with a short axis mode (SAM) of L1:L2:L3 = 1.5:1.5:1.0. The pole orientation is around {\lambda} = 330{\deg}, {\beta} = -27{\deg}. In addition, the model includes the possibility of binary hosting. For both models, the sense of rotation is retrograde. Furthermore, multiband photometry indicates that the taxonomy class of 107P/Wilson-Harrington is C-type. No clear rotational color variations are confirmed on the surface.
  • We present the results of an unbiased asteroid survey in the mid-infrared wavelength with the Infrared Camera (IRC) onboard the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI. About 20% of the point source events recorded in the AKARI All-Sky Survey observations are not used for the IRC Point Source Catalog (IRC-PSC) in its production process because of the lack of multiple detection by position. Asteroids, which are moving objects on the celestial sphere, remain in these "residual events". We identify asteroids out of the residual events by matching them with the positions of known asteroids. For the identified asteroids, we calculate the size and albedo based on the Standard Thermal Model. Finally we have a brand-new catalog of asteroids, named the Asteroid Catalog Using Akari (AcuA), which contains 5,120 objects, about twice as many as the IRAS asteroid catalog. The catalog objects comprise 4,953 main belt asteroids, 58 near Earth asteroids, and 109 Jovian Trojan asteroids. The catalog will be publicly available via the Internet.
  • Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) was observed with the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI in the near-infrared at a post-perihelion heliocentric distance of 1.7 AU. Observations were performed with the spectroscopic (2.5--5.0 micron) and imaging (2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 micron) modes on 2009 March 30 and 31 UT, respectively. AKARI images of the comet exhibit a sunward crescent-like shape coma and a dust tail extended toward the anti-solar direction. The 4.1 micron image (CO/CO2 and dust grains) shows a distribution different from the 2.4 and 3.2 micron images (H2O and dust grains). The observed spectrum shows distinct bands at 2.66 and 4.26 micron, attributed to H2O and CO2, respectively. This is the fifth comet in which CO2 has been directly detected in the near-infrared spectrum. In addition, CO at 4.67 micron and a broad 3.2--3.6 micron emission band from C-H bearing molecules were detected in the AKARI spectrum. The relative abundance ratios CO2/H2O and CO/H2O derived from the molecular production rates are \sim 4%--5% and < 2%, respectively. Comet Lulin belongs to the group that has relatively low abundances of CO and CO2 among the comets observed ever.
  • We present the characterization and calibration of the Slow-Scan observation mode of the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard the AKARI satellite. The FIS, one of the two focal-plane instruments on AKARI, has four photometric bands between 50--180 um with two types of Ge:Ga array detectors. In addition to the All-Sky Survey, FIS has also taken detailed far-infrared images of selected targets by using the Slow-Scan mode. The sensitivity of the Slow-Scan mode is one to two orders of magnitude better than that of the All-Sky Survey, because the exposure time on a targeted source is much longer. The point spread functions (PSFs) were obtained by observing several bright point-like objects such as asteroids, stars, and galaxies. The derived full widths at the half maximum (FWHMs) are ~30'' for the two shorter wavelength bands and ~40'' for the two longer wavelength bands, being consistent with those expected by the optical simulation, although a certain amount of excess is seen in the tails of the PSFs. The flux calibration has been performed by the observations of well-established photometric calibration standards (asteroids and stars) in a wide range of fluxes. After establishing the method of aperture photometry, the photometric accuracy for point-sources is better than +-15% in all of the bands expect for the longest wavelength.
  • We introduce the Dichroic-Mirror Camera (DMC), an instrument developed at the University of Tokyo which is capable of performing simultaneous imaging in fifteen bands. The main feature of the DMC is the dichroic mirrors, which split incoming light into red and blue components. Combination of dichroic mirrors split light from the telescope focus into fifteen intermediate-width bands across 390 -- 950 nm. The fifteen bands of DMC provide measurements of the object's spectral energy distribution (SED) at fifteen wavelength points. During May -- June 2007 and March 2008, observing run of the DMC was carried out at Higashi-Hiroshima Observatory, Japan. We observed several objects i.e. planets, asteroids, standard stars & star clusters, planetary nebulae, galaxies, and supernovae. We describe several early scientific results from the DMC.
  • We present a careful analysis of the point source detection limit of the AKARI All-Sky Survey in the WIDE-S 90 $\mu$m band near the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP). Timeline Analysis is used to detect IRAS sources and then a conversion factor is derived to transform the peak timeline signal to the interpolated 90 $\mu$m flux of a source. Combined with a robust noise measurement, the point source flux detection limit at S/N $>5$ for a single detector row is $1.1\pm0.1$ Jy which corresponds to a point source detection limit of the survey of $\sim$0.4 Jy. Wavelet transform offers a multiscale representation of the Time Series Data (TSD). We calculate the continuous wavelet transform of the TSD and then search for significant wavelet coefficients considered as potential source detections. To discriminate real sources from spurious or moving objects, only sources with confirmation are selected. In our multiscale analysis, IRAS sources selected above $4\sigma$ can be identified as the only real sources at the Point Source Scales. We also investigate the correlation between the non-IRAS sources detected in Timeline Analysis and cirrus emission using wavelet transform and contour plots of wavelet power spectrum. It is shown that the non-IRAS sources are most likely to be caused by excessive noise over a large range of spatial scales rather than real extended structures such as cirrus clouds.
  • The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) is one of two focal plane instruments on the AKARI satellite. FIS has four photometric bands at 65, 90, 140, and 160 um, and uses two kinds of array detectors. The FIS arrays and optics are designed to sweep the sky with high spatial resolution and redundancy. The actual scan width is more than eight arcmin, and the pixel pitch is matches the diffraction limit of the telescope. Derived point spread functions (PSFs) from observations of asteroids are similar to the optical model. Significant excesses, however, are clearly seen around tails of the PSFs, whose contributions are about 30% of the total power. All FIS functions are operating well in orbit, and its performance meets the laboratory characterizations, except for the two longer wavelength bands, which are not performing as well as characterized. Furthermore, the FIS has a spectroscopic capability using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Because the FTS takes advantage of the optics and detectors of the photometer, it can simultaneously make a spectral map. This paper summarizes the in-flight technical and operational performance of the FIS.
  • We present the spatially resolved observations of IRAS sources from the Japanese infrared astronomy satellite AKARI All-Sky Survey during the performance verification (PV) phase of the mission. We extracted reliable point sources matched with IRAS point source catalogue. By comparing IRAS and AKARI fluxes, we found that the flux measurements of some IRAS sources could have been over or underestimated and affected by the local background rather than the global background. We also found possible candidates for new AKARI sources and confirmed that AKARI observations resolved IRAS sources into multiple sources. All-Sky Survey observations are expected to verify the accuracies of IRAS flux measurements and to find new extragalactic point sources.