• Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials are unique in the wide variety of structural and electronic phases they exhibit in the two-dimensional (2D) single-layer limit. Here we show how such polymorphic flexibility can be used to achieve topological states at highly ordered phase boundaries in a new quantum spin Hall insulator (QSHI), 1T'-WSe2. We observe helical states at the crystallographically-aligned interface between quantum a spin Hall insulating domain of 1T'-WSe2 and a semiconducting domain of 1H-WSe2 in contiguous single layers grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The QSHI nature of single-layer 1T'-WSe2 was verified using ARPES to determine band inversion around a 120 meV energy gap, as well as STM spectroscopy to directly image helical edge-state formation. Using this new edge-state geometry we are able to directly confirm the predicted penetration depth of a helical interface state into the 2D bulk of a QSHI for a well-specified crystallographic direction. The clean, well-ordered topological/trivial interfaces observed here create new opportunities for testing predictions of the microscopic behavior of topologically protected boundary states without the complication of structural disorder.
  • Stanene (single-layer grey tin), with an electronic structure akin to that of graphene but exhibiting a much larger spin-orbit gap, offers a promising platform for room-temperature electronics based on the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect. This material has received much theoretical attention, but a suitable substrate for stanene growth that results in an overall gapped electronic structure has been elusive; a sizable gap is necessary for room-temperature applications. Here, we report a study of stanene epitaxially grown on the (111)B-face of indium antimonide (InSb). Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements reveal a gap of 0.44 eV, in agreement with our first-principles calculations. The results indicate that stanene on InSb(111) is a strong contender for electronic QSH applications.
  • The electron band structure of graphene on SrTiO3 substrate has been investigated as a function of temperature. The high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission study reveals that the spectral width at Fermi energy and the Fermi velocity of graphene on SrTiO3 are comparable to those of graphene on a BN substrate. Near the charge neutrality, the energy-momentum dispersion of graphene exhibits a strong deviation from the well-known linearity, which is magnified as temperature decreases. Such modification resembles the characteristics of enhanced electron-electron interaction. Our results not only suggest that SrTiO3 can be a plausible candidate as a substrate material for applications in graphene-based electronics, but also provide a possible route towards the realization of a new type of strongly correlated electron phases in the prototypical two-dimensional system via the manipulation of temperature and a proper choice of dielectric substrates.
  • The interaction between graphene and substrates provides a viable routes to enhance functionality of both materials. Depending on the nature of electronic interaction at the interface, the electron band structure of graphene is strongly influenced, allowing us to make use the intrinsic properties of graphene or to design additional functionality in graphene. Here, we present an angle-resolved photoemission study on the interaction between graphene and a platinum substrate. The formation of an interface between graphene and platinum leads to a strong deviation in the electronic structure of graphene not only from its freestanding form but also from the behavior observed on typical metals. The combined study on the experimental and theoretical electron band structure unveils the unique electronic properties of graphene on a platinum substrate, which singles out graphene/platinum as a model system investigating graphene on a metallic substrate with strong interaction.
  • Three-dimensional (3D) topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs) are rare but important as a versatile platform for exploring exotic electronic properties and topological phase transitions. A quintessential feature of TDSs is 3D Dirac fermions associated with bulk electronic states near the Fermi level. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we have observed such bulk Dirac cones in epitaxially-grown {\alpha}-Sn films on InSb(111), the first such TDS system realized in an elemental form. First-principles calculations confirm that epitaxial strain is key to the formation of the TDS phase. A phase diagram is established that connects the 3D TDS phase through a singular point of a zero-gap semimetal phase to a topological insulator (TI) phase. The nature of the Dirac cone crosses over from 3D to 2D as the film thickness is reduced.
  • A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • SnTe is a prototypical topological crystalline insulator, in which the gapless surface state is protected by a crystal symmetry. The hallmark of the topological properties in SnTe is the Dirac cones projected to the surfaces with mirror symmetry, stemming from the band inversion near the L points of its bulk Brillouin zone, which can be measured by angle-resolved photoemission. We have obtained the (111) surface of SnTe film by molecular beam epitaxy on BaF2(111) substrate. Photon-energy-dependence of in situ angle-resolved photoemission, covering multiple Brillouin zones in the direction perpendicular tothe (111) surface, demonstrate the projected Dirac cones at the Gamma_bar and M_bar points of the surface Brillouinzone. In addition, we observe a Dirac-cone-like band structure at the Gamma point of the bulk Brillouin zone,whose Dirac energy is largely different from those at the Gamma_bar and M_bar points.
  • We report systematic Angle Resolved Photoemission (ARPES) experiments using different photon polarizations and experimental geometries and find that the doping evolution of the normal state of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 deviates significantly from the predictions of a rigid band model. The data reveal a non-monotonic dependence upon doping of key quantities such as band filling, bandwidth of the electron pocket, and quasiparticle coherence. Our analysis suggests that the observed phenomenology and the inapplicability of the rigid band model in Co-doped Ba122 are due to electronic correlations, and not to either the size of the impurity potential, or self-energy effects due to impurity scattering. Our findings indicate that the effects of doping in pnictides are much more complicated than currently believed. More generally, they indicate that a deep understanding of the evolution of the electronic properties of the normal state, which requires an understanding of the doping process, remains elusive even for the 122 iron-pnictides, which are viewed as the least correlated of the high-TC unconventional superconductors.
  • The high temperature superconductivity in single-unit-cell (1UC) FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO)(001) and the observation of replica bands by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) have led to the conjecture that the coupling between FeSe electron and the STO phonon is responsible for the enhancement of Tc over other FeSe-based superconductors1,2. However the recent observation of a similar superconducting gap in FeSe grown on the (110) surface of STO raises the question of whether a similar mechanism applies3,4. Here we report the ARPES study of the electronic structure of FeSe grown on STO(110). Similar to the results in FeSe/STO(001), clear replica bands are observed. We also present a comparative study of STO (001) and STO(110) bare surfaces, where photo doping generates metallic surface states. Similar replica bands separating from the main band by approximately the same energy are observed, indicating this coupling is a generic feature of the STO surfaces and interfaces. Our findings suggest that the large superconducting gaps observed in FeSe films grown on two different STO surface terminations are likely enhanced by a common coupling between FeSe electrons and STO phonons.
  • High quality WSe2 films have been grown on bilayer graphene (BLG) with layer-by-layer control of thickness using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The combination of angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), and optical absorption measurements reveal the atomic and electronic structures evolution and optical response of WSe2/BLG. We observe that a bilayer of WSe2 is a direct bandgap semiconductor, when integrated in a BLG-based heterostructure, thus shifting the direct-indirect band gap crossover to trilayer WSe2. In the monolayer limit, WSe2 shows a spin-splitting of 475 meV in the valence band at the K point, the largest value observed among all the MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se) materials. The exciton binding energy of monolayer-WSe2/BLG is found to be 0.21 eV, a value that is orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional 3D semiconductors, yet small as compared to other 2D transition metal dichalcogennides (TMDCs) semiconductors. Finally, our finding regarding the overall modification of the electronic structure by an alkali metal surface electron doping opens a route to further control the electronic properties of TMDCs.
  • Properties of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are highly sensitive to the presence of defects in the crystal structure. A detailed understanding of defect structure may lead to control of material properties through defect engineering. Here we provide direct evidence for the existence of isolated, one-dimensional charge density waves at mirror twin boundaries in single-layer MoSe2. Our low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy measurements reveal a substantial bandgap of 60 - 140 meV opening at the Fermi level in the otherwise one dimensional metallic structure. We find an energy-dependent periodic modulation in the density of states along the mirror twin boundary, with a wavelength of approximately three lattice constants. The modulations in the density of states above and below the Fermi level are spatially out of phase, consistent with charge density wave order. In addition to the electronic characterization, we determine the atomic structure and bonding configuration of the one-dimensional mirror twin boundary by means of high-resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy. Density functional theory calculations reproduce both the gap opening and the modulations of the density of states.
  • Topological quantum materials represent a new class of matter with both exotic physical phenomena and novel application potentials. Many Heusler compounds, which exhibit rich emergent properties such as unusual magnetism, superconductivity and heavy fermion behaviour, have been predicted to host non-trivial topological electronic structures. The coexistence of topological order and other unusual properties makes Heusler materials ideal platform to search for new topological quantum phases (such as quantum anomalous Hall insulator and topological superconductor). By carrying out angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and ab initio calculations on rare-earth half-Heusler compounds LnPtBi (Ln=Lu, Y), we directly observed the unusual topological surface states on these materials, establishing them as first members with non-trivial topological electronic structure in this class of materials. Moreover, as LnPtBi compounds are non-centrosymmetric superconductors, our discovery further highlights them as promising candidates of topological superconductors.
  • Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are ideal systems for exploring the effects of dimensionality on correlated electronic phases such as charge density wave (CDW) order and superconductivity. In bulk NbSe2 a CDW sets in at TCDW = 33 K and superconductivity sets in at Tc = 7.2 K. Below Tc these electronic states coexist but their microscopic formation mechanisms remain controversial. Here we present an electronic characterization study of a single 2D layer of NbSe2 by means of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and electrical transport measurements. We demonstrate that 3x3 CDW order in NbSe2 remains intact in 2D. Superconductivity also still remains in the 2D limit, but its onset temperature is depressed to 1.9 K. Our STS measurements at 5 K reveal a CDW gap of {\Delta} = 4 meV at the Fermi energy, which is accessible via STS due to the removal of bands crossing the Fermi level for a single layer. Our observations are consistent with the simplified (compared to bulk) electronic structure of single-layer NbSe2, thus providing new insight into CDW formation and superconductivity in this model strongly-correlated system.
  • Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal substrates is an important route for obtaining large scale graphene. However, the interaction between graphene and the substrate often leads to multiple orientations, distorted graphene band structure, large doping and strong electron-phonon coupling. Here we report the growth of monolayer graphene with high crystalline quality on Pt(111) substrate by using a very low concentration of an internal carbon source with high annealing temperature. The controlled growth leads to electronically decoupled graphene: it is nearly charge neutral and has extremely weak electron-phonon coupling (coupling strength $\lambda$ $\approx$ 0.056) as revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopic measurements. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the carbon diffusion process is investigated by DFT calculation. Such graphene with negligible graphene-substrate interaction provides an important platform for fundamental research as well as device applications when combined with a nondestructive sample transfer technique.
  • Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide (FeCh) superconductors, the only iron-based family in proximity to an insulating phase. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to measure three representative FeCh superconductors, FeTe0.56Se0.44, K0.76Fe1.72Se2, and monolayer FeSe film grown on SrTiO3. We show that, these FeChs are all in a strongly correlated regime at low temperatures, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi-surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic superconducting state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. These observations establish that FeChs display universal orbital-selective strong correlation behaviors that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase (OSMP), hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.
  • Three-dimensional (3D) topological Weyl semimetals (TWSs) represent a novel state of quantum matter with unusual electronic structures that resemble both a "3D graphene" and a topological insulator by possessing pairs of Weyl points (through which the electronic bands disperse linearly along all three momentum directions) connected by topological surface states, forming the unique "Fermi-arc" type Fermi-surface (FS). Each Weyl point is chiral and contains half of the degrees of freedom of a Dirac point, and can be viewed as a magnetic monopole in the momentum space. Here, by performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on non-centrosymmetric compound TaAs, we observed its complete band structures including the unique "Fermi-arc" FS and linear bulk band dispersion across the Weyl points, in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations. This discovery not only confirms TaAs as the first 3D TWS, but also provides an ideal platform for realizing exotic physical phenomena (e.g. negative magnetoresistance, chiral magnetic effects and quantum anomalous Hall effect) which may also lead to novel future applications.
  • Despite the weak nature of interlayer forces in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials, their properties are highly dependent on the number of layers in the few-layer two-dimensional (2D) limit. Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and GW theoretical study of the electronic structure of high quality single- and few-layer MoSe2 grown on bilayer graphene. We find that the electronic (quasiparticle) bandgap, a fundamental parameter for transport and optical phenomena, decreases by nearly one electronvolt when going from one layer to three due to interlayer coupling and screening effects. Our results paint a clear picture of the evolution of the electronic wave function hybridization in the valleys of both the valence and conduction bands as the number of layers is changed. This demonstrates the importance of layer number and electron-electron interactions on van der Waals heterostructures, and helps to clarify how their electronic properties might be tuned in future 2D nanodevices.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit novel electrical and optical properties and are emerging as a new platform for exploring 2D semiconductor physics. Reduced screening in 2D results in dramatically enhanced electron-electron interactions, which have been predicted to generate giant bandgap renormalization and excitonic effects. Currently, however, there is little direct experimental confirmation of such many-body effects in these materials. Here we present an experimental observation of extraordinarily large exciton binding energy in a 2D semiconducting TMD. We accomplished this by determining the single-particle electronic bandgap of single-layer MoSe2 via scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), as well as the two-particle exciton transition energy via photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). These quantities yield an exciton binding energy of 0.55 eV for monolayer MoSe2, a value that is orders of magnitude larger than what is seen in conventional 3D semiconductors. This finding is corroborated by our ab initio GW and Bethe Salpeter equation calculations, which include electron correlation effects. The renormalized bandgap and large exciton binding observed here will have a profound impact on electronic and optoelectronic device technologies based on single-layer semiconducting TMDs.
  • Quantum systems in confined geometries are host to novel physical phenomena. Examples include quantum Hall systems in semiconductors and Dirac electrons in graphene. Interest in such systems has also been intensified by the recent discovery of a large enhancement in photoluminescence quantum efficiency and a potential route to valleytronics in atomically thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides, MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te), which are closely related to the indirect to direct bandgap transition in monolayers. Here, we report the first direct observation of the transition from indirect to direct bandgap in monolayer samples by using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy on high-quality thin films of MoSe2 with variable thickness, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The band structure measured experimentally indicates a stronger tendency of monolayer MoSe2 towards a direct bandgap, as well as a larger gap size, than theoretically predicted. Moreover, our finding of a significant spin-splitting of 180 meV at the valence band maximum of a monolayer MoSe2 film could expand its possible application to spintronic devices.
  • PdCrO$_2$ is material which has attracted interest due to the coexistence of metallic conductivity associated with itinerant Pd 4d electrons and antiferromagnetic order arising from localized Cr spins. A central issue is determining to what extent the magnetic order couples to the conduction electrons. Here we perform angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to experimentally characterize the electronic structure. We find that the Fermi surface has contributions from both bulk and surface states, which can be experimentally distinguished and theoretically verified by slab band structure calculations. The bulk Fermi surface shows no signature of electronic reconstruction in the antiferromagnetic state. This observation suggests that there is negligible interaction between the localized Cr spin structure and the itinerant Pd electrons measured by ARPES.
  • The nature of metallicity and the level of electronic correlations in the antiferromagnetically ordered parent compounds are two important open issues for the iron-based superconductivity. We perform a temperature-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of Fe1.02Te, the parent compound for iron chalcogenide superconductors. Deep in the antiferromagnetic state, the spectra exhibit a "peak-dip-hump" line shape associated with two clearly separate branches of dispersion, characteristics of polarons seen in manganites and lightly-doped cuprates. As temperature increases towards the Neel temperature (T_N), we observe a decreasing renormalization of the peak dispersion and a counterintuitive sharpening of the hump linewidth, suggestive of an intimate connection between the weakening electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling and antiferromagnetism. Our finding points to the highly-correlated nature of Fe1.02Te ground state featured by strong interactions among the charge, spin and lattice and a good metallicity plausibly contributed by the coherent polaron motion.
  • In this work, we study the A$_{x}$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ (A=K, Rb) superconductors using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In the low temperature state, we observe an orbital-dependent renormalization for the bands near the Fermi level in which the dxy bands are heavily renormliazed compared to the dxz/dyz bands. Upon increasing temperature to above 150K, the system evolves into a state in which the dxy bands have diminished spectral weight while the dxz/dyz bands remain metallic. Combined with theoretical calculations, our observations can be consistently understood as a temperature induced crossover from a metallic state at low temperature to an orbital-selective Mott phase (OSMP) at high temperatures. Furthermore, the fact that the superconducting state of A$_{x}$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ is near the boundary of such an OSMP constraints the system to have sufficiently strong on-site Coulomb interactions and Hund's coupling, and hence highlight the non-trivial role of electron correlation in this family of iron superconductors.
  • The Fermi velocity is one of the key concepts in the study of a material, as it bears information on a variety of fundamental properties. Upon increasing demand on the device applications, graphene is viewed as a prototypical system for engineering Fermi velocity. Indeed, several efforts have succeeded in modifying Fermi velocity by varying charge carrier concentration. Here we present a powerful but simple new way to engineer Fermi velocity while holding the charge carrier concentration constant. We find that when the environment embedding graphene is modified, the Fermi velocity of graphene is (i) inversely proportional to its dielectric constant, reaching ~2.5$\times10^6$ m/s, the highest value for graphene on any substrate studied so far and (ii) clearly distinguished from an ordinary Fermi liquid. The method demonstrated here provides a new route toward Fermi velocity engineering in a variety of two-dimensional electron systems including topological insulators.
  • Topological insulators represent a new state of quantum matter attractive to both fundamental physics and technological applications such as spintronics and quantum information processing. In a topological insulator, the bulk energy gap is traversed by spin-momentum locked surface states forming an odd number of surface bands that possesses unique electronic properties. However, transport measurements have often been dominated by residual bulk carriers from crystal defects or environmental doping which mask the topological surface contribution. Here we demonstrate (BixSb1-x)2Te3 as a tunable topological insulator system to manipulate bulk conductivity by varying the Bi/Sb composition ratio. (BixSb1-x)2Te3 ternary compounds are confirmed as topological insulators for the entire composition range by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and ab initio calculations. Additionally, we observe a clear ambipolar gating effect similar to that observed in graphene using nanoplates of (BixSb1-x)2Te3 in field-effect-transistor (FET) devices. The manipulation of carrier type and concentration in topological insulator nanostructures demonstrated in this study paves the way for implementation of topological insulators in nanoelectronics and spintronics.
  • Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies were performed on two compounds (TlBiTe$_2$ and TlBiSe$_2$) from a recently proposed three dimensional topological insulator family in Thallium-based III-V-VI$_2$ ternary chalcogenides. For both materials, we show that the electronic band structures are in broad agreement with the $ab$ $initio$ calculations; by surveying over the entire surface Brillouin zone (BZ), we demonstrate that there is a single Dirac cone reside at the center of BZ, indicating its topological non-triviality. For TlBiSe$_2$, the observed Dirac point resides at the top of the bulk valance band, making it a large gap ($\geq$200$meV$) topological insulator; while for TlBiTe$_2$, we found there exist a negative indirect gap between the bulk conduction band at $M$ point and the bulk valance band near $\Gamma$, making it a semi-metal at proper doping. Interestingly, the unique band structures of TlBiTe$_2$ we observed further suggest TlBiTe$_2$ may be a candidate for topological superconductors.