• Deep Convolutional features extracted from a comprehensive labeled dataset, contain substantial representations which could be effectively used in a new domain. Despite the fact that generic features achieved good results in many visual tasks, fine-tuning is required for pretrained deep CNN models to be more effective and provide state-of-the-art performance. Fine tuning using the backpropagation algorithm in a supervised setting, is a time and resource consuming process. In this paper, we present a new architecture and an approach for unsupervised object recognition that addresses the above mentioned problem with fine tuning associated with pretrained CNN-based supervised deep learning approaches while allowing automated feature extraction. Unlike existing works, our approach is applicable to general object recognition tasks. It uses a pretrained (on a related domain) CNN model for automated feature extraction pipelined with a Hopfield network based associative memory bank for storing patterns for classification purposes. The use of associative memory bank in our framework allows eliminating backpropagation while providing competitive performance on an unseen dataset.
  • Deep neural networks trained over large datasets learn features that are both generic to the whole dataset, and specific to individual classes in the dataset. Learned features tend towards generic in the lower layers and specific in the higher layers of a network. Methods like fine-tuning are made possible because of the ability for one filter to apply to multiple target classes. Much like the human brain this behavior, can also be used to cluster and separate classes. However, to the best of our knowledge there is no metric for how applicable learned features are to specific classes. In this paper we propose a definition and metric for measuring the applicability of learned features to individual classes, and use this applicability metric to estimate input applicability and produce a new method of unsupervised learning we call the CactusNet.
  • The readout electronics of a Micromegas (MM) module consume nearly 26 W of electric power, which causes the temperature of electronic board to increase upto $70\,^{\circ}{\rm C}$. Increase in temperature results in damage of electronics. Development of temperature gradient in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) may affect precise measurement as well. Two-phase CO$_2$ cooling has been applied to remove heat from the MM modules during two test beam experiments at DESY, Hamburg. Following the experimental procedure, a comprehensive study of the cooling technique has been accomplished for a single MM module by means of numerical simulation. This paper is focused to discuss the application of two-phase CO$_2$ cooling to keep the temperature below $30\,^{\circ}{\rm C}$ and stabilized within $0.2\,^{\circ}{\rm C}$.
  • Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been chosen as the main tracking system in several high-flux and high repetition rate experiments. These include on-going experiments such as ALICE and future experiments such as PANDA at FAIR and ILC. Different $\mathrm{R}\&\mathrm{D}$ activities were carried out on the adoption of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) as the gas amplification stage of the ALICE-TPC upgrade version. The requirement of low ion feedback has been established through these activities. Low ion feedback minimizes distortions due to space charge and maintains the necessary values of detector gain and energy resolution. In the present work, Garfield simulation framework has been used to study the related physical processes occurring within single, triple and quadruple GEM detectors. Ion backflow and electron transmission of quadruple GEMs, made up of foils with different hole pitch under different electromagnetic field configurations (the projected solutions for the ALICE TPC) have been studied. Finally a new triple GEM detector configuration with low ion backflow fraction and good electron transmission properties has been proposed as a simpler GEM-based alternative suitable for TPCs for future collider experiments.
  • Ion backflow is one of the effects limiting the operation of a gaseous detector at high flux, by giving rise to space charge which perturbs the electric field. The natural ability of bulk Micromegas to suppress ion feedback is very effective and can help the TPC drift volume to remain relatively free of space charge build-up. An efficient and precise measurement of the backflow fraction is necessary to cope up with the track distortion due to the space charge effect. In a subtle but significant modification of the usual approach, we have made use of two drift meshes in order to measure the ion backflow fraction for bulk Micromegas detector. This helps to truly represent the backflow fraction for a TPC. Moreover, attempt is taken to optimize the field configuration between the drift meshes. In conjunction with the experimental measurement, Garfield simulation framework has been used to simulate the related physics processes numerically.
  • The ICAL Collaboration: Shakeel Ahmed, M. Sajjad Athar, Rashid Hasan, Mohammad Salim, S. K. Singh, S. S. R. Inbanathan (The American College), Venktesh Singh, V. S. Subrahmanyam, Shiba Prasad Behera, Vinay B. Chandratre, Nitali Dash, Vivek M. Datar, V. K. S. Kashyap, Ajit K. Mohanty, Lalit M. Pant, Animesh Chatterjee, Sandhya Choubey, Raj Gandhi, Anushree Ghosh, Deepak Tiwari (HRI, Allahabad), Ali Ajmi, S. Uma Sankar, Prafulla Behera, Aleena Chacko, Sadiq Jafer, James Libby, K. Raveendrababu, K. R. Rebin, D. Indumathi, K. Meghna, S. M. Lakshmi, M. V. N. Murthy, Sumanta Pal, G. Rajasekaran, Nita Sinha, Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla, Amina Khatun, Poonam Mehta, Vipin Bhatnagar, R. Kanishka, A. Kumar, J. S. Shahi, J. B. Singh, Monojit Ghosh, Pomita Ghoshal, Srubabati Goswami, Chandan Gupta, Sushant Raut, Sudeb Bhattacharya, Suvendu Bose, Ambar Ghosal, Abhik Jash, Kamalesh Kar, Debasish Majumdar, Nayana Majumdar, Supratik Mukhopadhyay, Satyajit Saha (Saha Inst. Nucl. Phys., Kolkata), B. S. Acharya, Sudeshna Banerjee, Kolahal Bhattacharya, Sudeshna Dasgupta, Moon Moon Devi, Amol Dighe, Gobinda Majumder, Naba K. Mondal, Asmita Redij, Deepak Samuel, B. Satyanarayana, Tarak Thakore, C. D. Ravikumar, A. M. Vinodkumar, Gautam Gangopadhyay, Amitava Raychaudhuri, Brajesh C. Choudhary, Ankit Gaur, Daljeet Kaur, Ashok Kumar, Sanjeev Kumar, Md. Naimuddin, Waseem Bari, Manzoor A. Malik, S. Krishnaveni, H. B. Ravikumar, C. Ranganathaiah, Saikat Biswas, Subhasis Chattopadhyay, Rajesh Ganai, Tapasi Ghosh, Y. P. Viyogi
    May 9, 2017 hep-ph, hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Its charge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.
  • The intermediate map responses of a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) contain information about an image that can be used to extract contextual knowledge about it. In this paper, we present a core sampling framework that is able to use these activation maps from several layers as features to another neural network using transfer learning to provide an understanding of an input image. Our framework creates a representation that combines features from the test data and the contextual knowledge gained from the responses of a pretrained network, processes it and feeds it to a separate Deep Belief Network. We use this representation to extract more information from an image at the pixel level, hence gaining understanding of the whole image. We experimentally demonstrate the usefulness of our framework using a pretrained VGG-16 model to perform segmentation on the BAERI dataset of Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) imagery and the CAMVID dataset.
  • Numerical calculations have been performed to understand the reason for the observed non-uniform response of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) in a few critical regions such as near edge spacers and corners of the device. In this context, the signal from a RPC due to the passage of muons through different regions has been computed. Also, a simulation of RPC timing properties is presented along with the effect of the applied field, gas mixture and geometrical components.
  • We investigate the use of Deep Neural Networks for the classification of image datasets where texture features are important for generating class-conditional discriminative representations. To this end, we first derive the size of the feature space for some standard textural features extracted from the input dataset and then use the theory of Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension to show that hand-crafted feature extraction creates low-dimensional representations which help in reducing the overall excess error rate. As a corollary to this analysis, we derive for the first time upper bounds on the VC dimension of Convolutional Neural Network as well as Dropout and Dropconnect networks and the relation between excess error rate of Dropout and Dropconnect networks. The concept of intrinsic dimension is used to validate the intuition that texture-based datasets are inherently higher dimensional as compared to handwritten digits or other object recognition datasets and hence more difficult to be shattered by neural networks. We then derive the mean distance from the centroid to the nearest and farthest sampling points in an n-dimensional manifold and show that the Relative Contrast of the sample data vanishes as dimensionality of the underlying vector space tends to infinity.
  • The inner surfaces of the electrodes encompassing the gas volume of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) have been found to exhibit asperities with, grossly, three kinds of features. The desired uniform electric field within the gas volume of RPC is expected to be affected due to the presence of these asperities, which will eventually affect the final response from the detector. In this work, an attempt has been made to model the highly complex roughness of the electrode surfaces and compute its effect on the electrostatic field within RPC gas chamber. The calculations have been performed numerically using Finite Element Method (FEM) and Boundary Element Method (BEM) and the two methods have been compared in this context.
  • Micromegas detector is considered to be a promising candidate for a large variety of high-rate experiments. Micromegas of various geometries have already been established as appropriate for these experiments for their performances in terms of gas gain uniformity, energy and space point resolution, and their capability to efficiently pave large read-out surfaces with minimum dead zone. The present work investigates the effect of spacers on different detector characteristics of Micromegas detectors having various amplification gaps and mesh hole pitches. Numerical simulation has been used as a tool of exploration to evaluate the effect of such dielectric material on detector performance. Some of the important and fundamental characteristics such as electron transparency, gain and signal of the Micromegas detector have been estimated.
  • The operation of gas detectors is often limited by secondary effects, originating from avalanche-induced photons and ions. Ion backflow is one of the effects limiting the operation of a gas detector at high flux, by giving rise to space charge which disturbs the electric field locally. For the Micromegas detector, a large fraction of the secondary positive ions created in the avalanche can be stopped at the micro-mesh. The present work involves measurements of the ion backflow fraction (using an experimental setup comprising of two drift planes) in bulk Micromegas detectors as a function of detector design parameters. These measured characteristics have also been compared in detail to numerical simulations using the Garfield framework that combines packages such as neBEM, Magboltz and Heed. Further, the effect of using a second micro-mesh on ion backflow and other parameters has been studied numerically.
  • The present work involves the comparison of various bulk Micromegas detectors having different design parameters. Six detectors with amplification gaps of $64,~128,~192,~220 ~\mu\mathrm{m}$ and mesh hole pitch of $63,~78 ~\mu\mathrm{m}$ were tested at room temperature and normal gas pressure. Two setups were built to evaluate the effect of the variation of the amplification gap and mesh hole pitch on different detector characteristics. The gain, energy resolution and electron transmission of these Micromegas detectors were measured in Argon-Isobutane (90:10) gas mixture while the measurements of the ion backflow were carried out in P10 gas. These measured characteristics have been compared in detail to the numerical simulations using the Garfield framework that combines packages such as neBEM, Magboltz and Heed.
  • The Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors offer excellent spatial and temporal resolution in harsh radiation environments of high-luminosity colliders. In this work, an attempt has been made to establish an algorithm for estimating the time resolution of different MPGDs. It has been estimated numerically on the basis of two aspects, statistics and distribution of primary electrons and their diffusion in gas medium, while ignoring their multiplication. The effect of detector design parameters, field configuration and the composition of gas mixture on the resolution have also been investigated. Finally, a modification in the numerical approach considering the threshold limit of detecting the signal has been done and tested for the RPC detector for its future implementation in case of MPGDs.
  • For the International Large Detector concept at the planned International Linear Collider, the use of time projection chambers (TPC) with micro-pattern gas detector readout as the main tracking detector is investigated. In this paper, results from a prototype TPC, placed in a 1 T solenoidal field and read out with three independent GEM-based readout modules, are reported. The TPC was exposed to a 6 GeV electron beam at the DESY II synchrotron. The efficiency for reconstructing hits, the measurement of the drift velocity, the space point resolution and the control of field inhomogeneities are presented.
  • We present OptEx, a closed-form model of job execution on Apache Spark, a popular parallel processing engine. To the best of our knowledge, OptEx is the first work that analytically models job completion time on Spark. The model can be used to estimate the completion time of a given Spark job on a cloud, with respect to the size of the input dataset, the number of iterations, the number of nodes comprising the underlying cluster. Experimental results demonstrate that OptEx yields a mean relative error of 6% in estimating the job completion time. Furthermore, the model can be applied for estimating the cost optimal cluster composition for running a given Spark job on a cloud under a completion deadline specified in the SLO (i.e., Service Level Objective). We show experimentally that OptEx is able to correctly estimate the cost optimal cluster composition for running a given Spark job under an SLO deadline with an accuracy of 98%.
  • Users of distributed datastores that employ quorum-based replication are burdened with the choice of a suitable client-centric consistency setting for each storage operation. The above matching choice is difficult to reason about as it requires deliberating about the tradeoff between the latency and staleness, i.e., how stale (old) the result is. The latency and staleness for a given operation depend on the client-centric consistency setting applied, as well as dynamic parameters such as the current workload and network condition.We present OptCon, a novel machine learning-based predictive framework, that can automate the choice of client-centric consistency setting under user-specified latency and staleness thresholds given in the service level agreement (SLA). Under a given SLA, OptCon predicts a client-centric consistency setting that is matching, i.e., it is weak enough to satisfy the latency threshold, while being strong enough to satisfy the staleness threshold. While manually tuned consistency settings remain fixed unless explicitly reconfigured, OptCon tunes consistency settings on a per-operation basis with respect to changing workload and network state. Using decision tree learning, OptCon yields 0.14 cross validation error in predicting matching consistency settings under latency and staleness thresholds given in the SLA. We demonstrate experimentally that OptCon is at least as effective as any manually chosen consistency settings in adapting to the SLA thresholds for different use cases. We also demonstrate that OptCon adapts to variations in workload, whereas a given manually chosen fixed consistency setting satisfies the SLA only for a characteristic workload.
  • This paper presents an intelligent tutoring system, GeoTutor, for Euclidean Geometry that is automatically able to synthesize proof problems and their respective solutions given a geometric figure together with a set of properties true of it. GeoTutor can provide personalized practice problems that address student deficiencies in the subject matter.
  • Learning sparse feature representations is a useful instrument for solving an unsupervised learning problem. In this paper, we present three labeled handwritten digit datasets, collectively called n-MNIST. Then, we propose a novel framework for the classification of handwritten digits that learns sparse representations using probabilistic quadtrees and Deep Belief Nets. On the MNIST and n-MNIST datasets, our framework shows promising results and significantly outperforms traditional Deep Belief Networks.
  • Satellite image classification is a challenging problem that lies at the crossroads of remote sensing, computer vision, and machine learning. Due to the high variability inherent in satellite data, most of the current object classification approaches are not suitable for handling satellite datasets. The progress of satellite image analytics has also been inhibited by the lack of a single labeled high-resolution dataset with multiple class labels. The contributions of this paper are twofold - (1) first, we present two new satellite datasets called SAT-4 and SAT-6, and (2) then, we propose a classification framework that extracts features from an input image, normalizes them and feeds the normalized feature vectors to a Deep Belief Network for classification. On the SAT-4 dataset, our best network produces a classification accuracy of 97.95% and outperforms three state-of-the-art object recognition algorithms, namely - Deep Belief Networks, Convolutional Neural Networks and Stacked Denoising Autoencoders by ~11%. On SAT-6, it produces a classification accuracy of 93.9% and outperforms the other algorithms by ~15%. Comparative studies with a Random Forest classifier show the advantage of an unsupervised learning approach over traditional supervised learning techniques. A statistical analysis based on Distribution Separability Criterion and Intrinsic Dimensionality Estimation substantiates the effectiveness of our approach in learning better representations for satellite imagery.
  • The bulk Micromegas detector is considered to be a promising candidate for building TPCs for several future experiments including the projected linear collider. The standard bulk with a spacing of 128 micron has already established itself as a good choice for its performances in terms of gas gain uniformity, energy and space point resolution, and its capability to efficiently pave large readout surfaces with minimum dead zone. The present work involves the comparison of this standard bulk with a relatively less used bulk Micromegas detector having a larger amplification gap of 192 micron. Detector gain, energy resolution and electron transparency of these Micromegas have been measured under different conditions in various argon based gas mixtures to evaluate their performance. These measured characteristics have also been compared in detail to numerical simulations using the Garfield framework that combines packages such as neBEM, Magboltz and Heed. Further, we have carried out another numerical study to determine the effect of dielectric spacers on different detector features. A comprehensive comparison of the two detectors has been presented and analyzed in this work.
  • In this work, we have tried to develop a detailed understanding of the physical processes occurring in those variants of Micro Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGDs) that share micro hole and micro strip geometry, like GEM, MHSP and MSGC etc. Some of the important and fundamental characteristics of these detectors such as gain, transparency, efficiency and their operational dependence on different device parameters have been estimated following detailed numerical simulation of the detector dynamics. We have used a relatively new simulation framework developed especially for the MPGDs that combines packages such as GARFIELD, neBEM, MAGBOLTZ and HEED. The results compare closely with the available experimental data. This suggests the efficacy of the framework to model the intricacies of these micro-structured detectors in addition to providing insight into their inherent complex dynamical processes.
  • The previously reported neBEM solver has been used to solve electrostatic problems having three-dimensional edges and corners in the physical domain. Both rectangular and triangular elements have been used to discretize the geometries under study. In order to maintain very high level of precision, a library of C functions yielding exact values of potential and flux influences due to uniform surface distribution of singularities on flat triangular and rectangular elements has been developed and used. Here we present the exact expressions proposed for computing the influence of uniform singularity distributions on triangular elements and illustrate their accuracy. We then consider several problems of electrostatics containing edges and singularities of various orders including plates and cubes, and L-shaped conductors. We have tried to show that using the approach proposed in the earlier paper on neBEM and its present enhanced (through the inclusion of triangular elements) form, it is possible to obtain accurate estimates of integral features such as the capacitance of a given conductor and detailed ones such as the charge density distribution at the edges / corners without taking resort to any new or special formulation. Results obtained using neBEM have been compared extensively with both existing analytical and numerical results. The comparisons illustrate the accuracy, flexibility and robustness of the new approach quite comprehensively.