• We have used the narrow $2S_{1/2} \rightarrow 3P_{3/2}$ transition in the ultraviolet (uv) to laser cool and magneto-optically trap (MOT) $^6$Li atoms. Laser cooling of lithium is usually performed on the $2S_{1/2} \rightarrow 2P_{3/2}$ (D2) transition, and temperatures of $\sim$300 $\mu$K are typically achieved. The linewidth of the uv transition is seven times narrower than the D2 line, resulting in lower laser cooling temperatures. We demonstrate that a MOT operating on the uv transition reaches temperatures as low as 59 $\mu$K. Furthermore, we find that the light shift of the uv transition in an optical dipole trap at 1070 nm is small and blue-shifted, facilitating efficient loading from the uv MOT. Evaporative cooling of a two spin-state mixture of $^6$Li in the optical trap produces a quantum degenerate Fermi gas with $3 \times 10^{6}$ atoms a total cycle time of only 11 s.
  • Antiferromagnetism of ultracold fermions in an optical lattice can be detected by Bragg diffraction of light, in analogy to the diffraction of neutrons from solid state materials. A finite sublattice magnetization will lead to a Bragg peak from the (1/2 1/2 1/2) crystal plane with an intensity depending on details of the atomic states, the frequency and polarization of the probe beam, the direction and magnitude of the sublattice magnetization, and the finite optical density of the sample. Accounting for these effects we make quantitative predictions about the scattering intensity and find that with experimentally feasible parameters the signal can be readily measured with a CCD camera or a photodiode and used to detect antiferromagnetic order.
  • We use a Feshbach resonance to tune the scattering length a of a Bose-Einstein condensate of 7Li in the |F = 1, m_F = 1> state. Using the spatial extent of the trapped condensate we extract a over a range spanning 7 decades from small attractive interactions to extremely strong repulsive interactions. The shallow zero-crossing in the wing of the Feshbach resonance enables the determination of a as small as 0.01 Bohr radii. In this regime, evidence of the weak anisotropic magnetic dipole interaction is obtained by comparison with different trap geometries.
  • We investigate the effect of enhancing gravity on saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen for effective gravities of 1g, 6.0g, and 16g (g=9.8 m/s^2) at a saturation pressure of 760 torr and for heat fluxes of 10 ~ 3000 W/m^2. The effective gravity on the oxygen is increased by applying a magnetic body force generated by a superconducting solenoid. We measure the heater temperature (expressed as a reduced superheat) as a function of heat flux and fit this data to a piecewise power-law/linear boiling curve. At low heat flux (<400 W/m^2) the superheat is proportional to the cube root of the heat flux. At higher heat fluxes, the superheat is a linear function of the heat flux. To within statistical uncertainties, which are limited by variations among experimental runs, we find no variation of the boiling curve over our applied gravity range.
  • Quasiparticle tunneling spectroscopic studies of electron- (n-type) and hole-doped (p-type) cuprates reveal that the pairing symmetry, pseudogap phenomenon and spatial homogeneity of the superconducting order parameter are all non-universal. We compare our studies of p-type YBa_2Cu_3O_{7-x} and n-type infinite-layer Sr_{0.9}Ln_{0.1}CuO_2 (Ln = La, Gd) systems with results from p-type Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_x and n-type one-layer Nd_{1.85}Ce_{0.15}CuO_4 cuprates, and attribute various non-universal behavior to different competing orders in p-type and n-type cuprates.