• We observed the spiral galaxies M51 and M83 at 20" spatial resolution with the bolometer array AzTEC on the JCMT in the 1.1$\,$mm continuum, recovering the extended emission out to galactocentric radii of more than 12 kpc in both galaxies. The 1.1 mm-continuum fluxes are 5.6+/-0.7 and 9.9+/-1.4 Jy, with associated gas masses estimated at 9.4 X 10^9 Mo and 7.2 X 10^9 Mo for M51 and M83, respectively. In the interarm regions of both galaxies the N(H2)/I(CO) (or X-factor) ratios exceed those in the arms by factors of ~1.5-2. In the inner disks of both galaxies, the X-factor is about 1 X 10^20 cm^-2 / (K km s^-1). In the outer parts, the CO-dark molecular gas becomes more important. While the spiral density wave in M51 appears to influence the interstellar medium and stars in a similar way, the bar potential in M83 influences the interstellar medium and the stars differently. We confirm the result of Foyle et al. (2010) that the arms merely heighten the star formation rate and the gas surface density in the same proportion. Our maps reveal a threshold gas surface density for an SFR increase by two or more orders of magnitude. In both galaxy centers, the molecular gas depletion time is about 1 Gyr climbing to 10-20 Gyr at radii of 6-8 kpc. This is consistent with an inside-out depletion of the molecular gas in the disks of spiral galaxies.
  • A new technique for reliably identifying point sources in millimeter/sub-millimeter wavelength maps is presented. This method accounts for the frequency dependence of noise in the Fourier domain as well as non-uniformities in the coverage of a field. This optimal filter is an improvement over commonly-used matched filters that ignore coverage gradients. Treating noise variations in the Fourier domain as well as map space is traditionally viewed as a computationally intensive problem. We show that the penalty incurred in terms of computing time is quite small due to casting many of the calculations in terms of FFTs and exploiting the absence of sharp features in the noise spectra of observations. Practical aspects of implementing the optimal filter are presented in the context of data from the AzTEC bolometer camera. The advantages of using the new filter over the standard matched filter are also addressed in terms of a typical AzTEC map.
  • We report the results of the counterpart identification and a detailed analysis of the physical properties of the 48 sources discovered in our deep 1.1mm wavelength imaging survey of the GOODS-South field using the AzTEC instrument on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). One or more robust or tentative counterpart candidate is found for 27 and 14 AzTEC sources, respectively, by employing deep radio continuum, Spitzer MIPS & IRAC, and LABOCA 870 micron data. Five of the sources (10%) have two robust counterparts each, supporting the idea that these galaxies are strongly clustered and/or heavily confused. Photometric redshifts and star formation rates (SFRs) are derived by analyzing UV-to-optical and IR-to-radio SEDs. The median redshift of z~2.6 is similar to other earlier estimates, but we show that 80% of the AzTEC-GOODS sources are at z>2, with a significant high redshift tail (20% at z>3.3). Rest-frame UV and optical properties of AzTEC sources are extremely diverse, spanning 10 magnitude in the i- and K-band photometry with median values of i=25.3 and K=22.6 and a broad range of red colour (i-K=0-6). These AzTEC sources are some of the most luminous galaxies in the rest-frame optical bands at z>2, with inferred stellar masses of (1-30) x 10^{10} solar masses and UV-derived star formation rates of SFR(UV) > 10-1000 solar masses per year. The IR-derived SFR, 200-2000 solar masses per year, is independent of redshift or stellar mass. The resulting specific star formation rates, SSFR = 1-100 per Gyr, are 10-100 times higher than similar mass galaxies at z=0, and they extend the previously observed rapid rise in the SSFR with redshift to z=2-5. These galaxies have a SFR high enough to have built up their entire stellar mass within their Hubble time. We find only marginal evidence for an AGN contribution to the near-IR and mid-IR SEDs. (abridged)
  • We present wide-field 1.1 mm continuum imaging of the nearby spiral galaxy M 33, conducted with the AzTEC bolometer camera on ASTE. We show that the 1.1 mm flux traces the distribution of dust with T ~20 K. Combined with far-infrared imaging at 160um, we derive the dust temperature distribution out to a galactic radius of ~7 kpc with a spatial resolution of ~100 parsecs. Although the 1.1 mm flux is observed predominantly near star forming regions, we find a smooth radial temperature gradient declining from ~20 K to ~13 K, consistent with recent results from the Herschel satellite. Further comparison of individual regions show a strong correlation between the cold dust temperature and the Ks band brightness, but not with the ionizing flux. The observed results imply that the dominant heating source of cold dust at few hundred parsec scales are due to the non-OB stars, even when associated with star forming regions.
  • The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS) takes advantage of gravitational lensing by massive galaxy clusters to sample a population of high-redshift galaxies which are too faint to be detected above the confusion limit of current far-infrared/submillimeter telescopes. Measurements from 100-500 micron bracket the peaks of the far-infrared spectral energy distributions of these galaxies, characterizing their infrared luminosities and star formation rates. We introduce initial results from our science demonstration phase observations, directed toward the Bullet cluster (1E0657-56). By combining our observations with LABOCA 870 micron and AzTEC 1.1 mm data we fully constrain the spectral energy distributions of 19 MIPS 24 micron selected galaxies which are located behind the cluster. We find that their colors are best fit using templates based on local galaxies with systematically lower infrared luminosities.This suggests that our sources are not like local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies in which vigorous star formation is contained in a compact highly dust-obscured region. Instead, they appear to be scaled up versions of lower luminosity local galaxies with star formation occurring on larger physical scales.
  • [Abridged] We present the first results from a 1.1 mm confusion-limited map of the GOODS-S field taken with AzTEC on the ASTE telescope. We imaged a 270 sq. arcmin field to a 1\sigma depth of 0.48 - 0.73 mJy/beam, making this one of the deepest blank-field surveys at mm-wavelengths ever achieved. Although our GOODS-S map is extremely confused, we demonstrate that our source identification and number counts analyses are robust, and the techniques discussed in this paper are relevant for other deeply confused surveys. We find a total of 41 dusty starburst galaxies with S/N >= 3.5 within this uniformly covered region, where only two are expected to be false detections. We derive the 1.1mm number counts from this field using both a "P(d)" analysis and a semi-Bayesian technique, and find that both methods give consistent results. Our data are well-fit by a Schechter function model with (S', N(3mJy), \alpha) = (1.30+0.19 mJy, 160+27 (mJy/deg^2)^(-1), -2.0). Given the depth of this survey, we put the first tight constraints on the 1.1 mm number counts at S(1.1mm) = 0.5 mJy, and we find evidence that the faint-end of the number counts at S(850\mu m) < 2.0 mJy from various SCUBA surveys towards lensing clusters are biased high. In contrast to the 870 \mu m survey of this field with the LABOCA camera, we find no apparent under-density of sources compared to previous surveys at 1.1 mm. Additionally, we find a significant number of SMGs not identified in the LABOCA catalogue. We find that in contrast to observations at wavelengths < 500 \mu m, MIPS 24 \mu m sources do not resolve the total energy density in the cosmic infrared background at 1.1 mm, demonstrating that a population of z > 3 dust-obscured galaxies that are unaccounted for at these shorter wavelengths potentially contribute to a large fraction (~2/3) of the infrared background at 1.1 mm.
  • We present results from a multi-wavelength study of 29 sources (false detection probabilities <5%) from a survey of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North field at 1.1mm using the AzTEC camera. Comparing with existing 850um SCUBA studies in the field, we examine differences in the source populations selected at the two wavelengths. The AzTEC observations uniformly cover the entire survey field to a 1-sigma depth of ~1mJy. Searching deep 1.4GHz VLA, and Spitzer 3--24um catalogues, we identify robust counterparts for 21 1.1mm sources, and tentative associations for the remaining objects. The redshift distribution of AzTEC sources is inferred from available spectroscopic and photometric redshifts. We find a median redshift of z=2.7, somewhat higher than z=2.0 for 850um-selected sources in the same field, and our lowest redshift identification lies at a spectroscopic redshift z=1.1460. We measure the 850um to 1.1mm colour of our sources and do not find evidence for `850um dropouts', which can be explained by the low-SNR of the observations. We also combine these observed colours with spectroscopic redshifts to derive the range of dust temperatures T, and dust emissivity indices $\beta$ for the sample, concluding that existing estimates T~30K and $\beta$~1.75 are consistent with these new data.
  • We have conducted a deep and uniform 1.1 mm survey of the GOODS-N field with AzTEC on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Here we present the first results from this survey including maps, the source catalogue, and 1.1 mm number-counts. The results presented here were obtained from a 245 sq-arcmin region with near uniform coverage to a depth of 0.96-1.16 mJy/beam. Our robust catalogue contains 28 source candidates detected with S/N >= 3.75, only 1-2 of which are expected to be spurious detections. Of these source candidates, 8 are also detected by SCUBA at 850 um in regions where there is good overlap between the two surveys. The major advantage of our survey over that with SCUBA is the uniformity of coverage. We calculate number counts using two different techniques: the first using a frequentist parameter estimation, and the second using a Bayesian method. The two sets of results are in good agreement. We find that the 1.1 mm differential number counts are well described in the 2-6 mJy range by the functional form dN/dS = N' (S'/S) exp(-S/S') with fitted parameters S' = 1.25 +/-0.38 mJy and dN/dS = 300 +/- 90 per mJy per sq-deg at 3 mJy.
  • AzTEC is a mm-wavelength bolometric camera utilizing 144 silicon nitride micromesh detectors. Herein we describe the AzTEC instrument architecture and its use as an astronomical instrument. We report on several performance metrics measured during a three month observing campaign at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, and conclude with our plans for AzTEC as a facility instrument on the Large Millimeter Telescope.
  • Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSBs) are a new type of detector for millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths that are transparent to all but a narrow range of frequencies as set by characteristics of the absorber itself. Therefore, stacks of FSBs tuned to different frequencies provide a low-loss compact method for utilizing a large fraction of the light collected by a telescope. Tests of prototype FSBs, described here, indicate that the absorption spectra are well predicted by models, that peak absolute absorption efficiencies of order 50% are attainable, and that their out-of-band transmission is high.